Projects By Product: Report

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives use a collaborative approach to identify landscape scale conservation solutions. LCCs work across jurisdictional and political boundaries to work with partners to: meet unfilled conservation needs, develop decision support tools, share data and knowledge, and facilitate and foster partnerships.

As part of a shared science strategy, LCCs coordinate closely with the National Climate Change and Wildlife Center and the eight regional Climate Science Centers.

Marshes are a critical habitat for a diversity of fauna and the ecological functioning of the coast.

The objective is to create a hydrologic foundation for detailed assessment of human and climate impacts on stream and river flows, including the impacts of hydrologic alterations on aquatic habitats.

This project provides technical assistance in integrating the Waterfall instream flow models developed for the South Atlantic LCC by RTI with the PRMS models being developed in the neighboring Gulf Coastal Plains and Ozarks LCC.

Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers LCC is one of 22 Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) that serve as a forum for collaboration among many diverse partners working together to meet shared natural and cultural resource priorities for current and future generations.

FY2014Recent drought, change agents and the spectrum of greater management needs have highlighted the relative dearth of in situ weather and climate measurement stations in the Great Basin. Thus, interest has grown in supplementing or initiating atmospheric and hydrologic measurements.

FY2016This project will evaluate the effects of vegetation treatments on population connectivity, genetic diversity and gene flow of wildlife species across the full extent of the Great Basin LCC.

FY2014This project builds upon the springs and seeps inventory funded by the Desert LCC.

This project will:

FY2015The Great Basin Region, which covers much of Nevada, and portions of California, Oregon, Idaho, and Utah, managers are already confronting a changing climate and are beginning to make management decisions despite uncertainty in how climate change effects will manifest in the region.

FY2015The Great Basin Region, which covers much of Nevada, and portions of California, Oregon, Idaho, and Utah, managers are already confronting a changing climate and are beginning to make management decisions despite uncertainty in how climate change effects will manifest in the region.

FY2014The purpose of this project is to develop a series of high resolution (1:24,000 scale) digital wetland maps and associated data to support conservation planning in Nevada.

FY2015Persistent ecosystem and anthropogenic disturbances and stressors are threatening sustainability of sagebrush ecosystems in the western US, and managers and policy makers are seeking strategic, holistic approaches for species conservation and ecosystem restoration.

FY2014Workshops that provide tribal representatives with an introduction to planning for climate change impacts.

WDFW will use funds provided by the NPLCC to integrate climate change impacts and implications into our State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) Revision.

Research on coastal change in Cook Inlet and South East Alaska has increased rapidly in recent years, making it challenging to track existing projects, understand their cumulative insights, gauge remaining research gaps, and prioritize future work.

This project supported a bi-national workshop bringing together researchers and practitioners from across the range of the NPLCC.

The Tongass National Forest has identified resources that are important to stakeholders and vulnerable to climate-related stressors. Cooperators will review an action plan and convene a workshop to be held in Southeast Alaska in 2016.

The Tongass National Forest has identified resources that are important to stakeholders and vulnerable to climate-related stressors. Cooperators will review an action plan and convene a workshop to be held in Southeast Alaska in 2016.

The Humboldt Bay-Eel River region may experience the highest rate of relative sea level rise increase along the West Coast. The Project will engage stakeholders to discuss community and science needs for planning and implementing adaptation measures to sea level rise.

The Humboldt Bay-Eel River region may experience the highest rate of relative sea level rise increase along the West Coast. The Project will engage stakeholders to discuss community and science needs for planning and implementing adaptation measures to sea level rise.

This multi-LCC project is designed to evaluate delivery of existing courses offered through the National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) as “pilots” to enhance expertise needed within the regional context of LCC and Climate Science Center (CSC) communities.

Summary  Conduct an objective assessment of the existing programs monitoring climate-sensitive ecological variables (biological and geophysical) in the terrestrial Hawaiian environment, generate a summary for consideration at an expert workshop, participate in the workshop, and summarize the cons

Develop a thorough analysis of the current policies, mandates, institutional relationships and practices that affect decisions and actions by conservation entities in Hawai’i regarding climate change adaptation, and recommendations for potential improvements.  

The objective of this project is to identify areas where herbivore management interventions would be the most effective in promoting coral reef recovery and resiliency following the recent coral bleaching.

With support from the North Atlantic LCC and Hurricane Sandy Disaster Mitigation funds the North Atlantic Aquatic Connectivity Collaborative (www.streamcontinuity.org) has developed a regional crossing assessment protocol and database, scoring systems

The North Atlantic Region of the United States and Canada boasts diverse habitats, from coasts to mountains, that support endemic and rare plant species. However, recent conservation actions and prioritization efforts in this region have neglected to include plants.

The North Atlantic Region of the United States and Canada boasts diverse habitats, from coasts to mountains, that support endemic and rare plant species. However, recent conservation actions and prioritization efforts in this region have neglected to include plants.

    Numerous studies have documented the effects of landscape disturbance, including that associated with energy development, on increased abundance of invasive and non-native species.

Cottonwood forests are in decline becasue of losses from land use conversion and reduced regeneration from river regulation.

The impact of agricultural drainage and resulting non-point source nutrient export on water quality is a growing concern across the entire Prairie Pothole Region.

The impact of agricultural drainage and resulting non-point source nutrient export on water quality is a growing concern across the entire Prairie Pothole Region.

     Economic, market-based grassland conservation approaches are needed for expired Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) lands.

     Native grasslands have been reduced to a fraction of their original extent, with estimated total loss prior to the 1990s of 70% for prairie grassland (Federal Provincial and Territorial Governments of Canada 2010).

Wyoming's State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) is a comprehensive strategy to maintain the health and diversity of wildlife within the state, including reducing the need for future listings under the Endangered Species Act.

Of the vital rates that determine recruitment, breeding propensity (i.e., the proportion of females that lay at least one egg) and nest success appear to have the greatest influence, but breeding propensity remains poorly studied.

The decline in the monarch butterfly has led to it being considered for listing under the Endangered Species Act.

The decline in the monarch butterfly has led to it being considered for listing under the Endangered Species Act.

The Red River Stakeholder Engagement project’s primary objective was to uncover areas of concern for stakeholders who live, work, and play along the Red River Basin. It examined the complexity of the cultural-geographic landscape across the Red River Basin.

We propose to empirically characterize hydrology/fish-production relationships for different ecological groups of fishes living in the Red River and associated reservoir habitats by: 1. Correlating historic hydrologic data with catch curve residuals, and 2.

The GCP LCC Steering Committee tasked the GCP LCC Science Team to reduce to 25 a list Surrogate Species (from a long list of Priority, and Focal Species) for use in conservation planning.

In response to the rapid and dramatic hydroecological deterioration of the Rio Grande through Big Bend, the Big Bend Conservation Cooperative (BBCC), a multi-disciplinary group of natural resource agencies, research institutions, and conservation organizations have been organizing and implementin

Land managers and resource and conservation professionals across political and organizational boundaries (e.g. state and federal agencies, non-governmental organizations, private landowners) often lack a common framework for planning and coordinated decision-making on a regional scale.

This project will use existing climate change scenarios and sea-level rise projections to create a Climate Change Adaptation Plan in collaboration with the Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana.

In 2012, the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (SALCC) began development of its process to select natural resource indicators and targets as specific landscape scale measures of success for natural resources.

There are myriad barriers to aquatic connectivity beyond dams, with culverts at road crossings primary among them. UGA will lead the effort to develop a database of these non-dam blockages and model the likelihood that each is a barrier to fish movement, including mussel hosts.

The primary objective of this project is to develop a short synthesis report assessing 11 habitats, using a variety of ecological indicators.

The South Atlantic LCC is seeking technical assistance in the testing process for their newly chosen terrestrial natural resource indicators (http://www.southatlanticlcc.org/indicators).

The South Atlantic LCC is seeking technical assistance in evaluating the past, current, and future condition of the ecological systems of the South Atlantic.