Projects By Product: Report

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives use a collaborative approach to identify landscape scale conservation solutions. LCCs work across jurisdictional and political boundaries to work with partners to: meet unfilled conservation needs, develop decision support tools, share data and knowledge, and facilitate and foster partnerships.

As part of a shared science strategy, LCCs coordinate closely with the National Climate Change and Wildlife Center and the eight regional Climate Science Centers.

The RESTORE Act (33 U.S. Code § 1321) directs 80% of Clean Water Act penalties from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (likely to be in the billions) to Gulf of Mexico restoration.

We will work with Landscape Conservation Cooperative partners to (1) edge match the Oklahoma and Texas Ecological Systems (ECS) data sets, (2) complete an enduring features (ecological site type; geophysical setting) data set for Oklahoma, (3) create a process for up-dating the ECS data set by de

Submersed aquatic vegetation, a critical component of highly productive coastal ecosystems, is greatly affected by sea level rise.

The goal of the project is to determine biodiversity impacts of land restoration associated with
clean and renewable energy development; specifically, natural gas production through
anaerobic digestion of hog manure and native plant material, as being forwarded by Roeslein

Urban communities are increasingly shaping the conservation future of the South Atlantic. Major metropolitan areas present both direct threats, such as loss habitat and open space, and indirect threats, such as creating barriers to connectivity.

Many organizations in the South are struggling to meet current their current renewable energy mandates. Twelve different organizations in the South Atlantic are now discussing ways to work together to help meet those mandates.

The Desert LCC will provide the 50% of the Federal component of funds, and the work designed will support the science objectives for the Desert LCC and its partners as well as provide needed improvements to the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) in the Lower Colorado River Region, and beyond.

There are few resources that provide managers cross-scale information for planning climate adaptation strategies for species and taxa at risk. Appropriate allocation of resources requires an understanding of mechanisms influencing a species’ risk to global change. Dr.

A native grass/forb field trial/research planting to identify the best mixture of native grasses and forbs that optimize native plant diversity, ecological benefits, and biomass yield for anaerobic digestion is necessary as a proof-of-concept.

The project had four explicit objectives: 1) Conduct a climate vulnerability assessment of Species of Greatest Need of Conservation and major habitat types 2) Identify conservation strategies that increase resiliency or adaptive capacity, or mitigate the effects of climate change 3) Outline an ad

After two funding cycles, the Upper Midwest and Great Lakes (UM&GL) Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) decided a more strategic approach was needed to address theconservation priorities of the region.

This project connects scientists and managers from federal, tribal and state agencies and nongovernmental organizations to exchange information and establish common priorities for management of terrestrial wildlife populations.

    As a major threat to global biodiversity, climate change will alter where and how we manage conservation lands (e.g., parks, refuges, wildlife management areas, natural areas).

Capacity to prioritize barrier removals in the Great Lakes basin is currently limited by lack of data on the passability of road crossings and dams for both unwanted invasive species and desirable native migratory fishes.

In 2015-2016, the City of St. Louis proposes to partner with several local stakeholders to expand Milkweeds for Monarchs: The St. Louis Butterfly Project (M4M) using targeted education and outreach to City schools and neighborhoods. The Missouri Botanical Garden and St.

Habitat fragmentation is considered to be a leading cause that is responsible for the long-term population declines of Northern Bobwhites.

Habitat loss and degradation due to urban expansion and other human activities have raised concerns for the Western Gulf Coast Mottled Duck population. This species relies on tidal, palustrine, and agricultural wetlands as well as grasslands for all of its life cycle needs.

Flow alteration -- from new and existing water supply projects, increased urbanization, and drought conditions -- is a pervasive threat to aquatic wildlife throughout the Gulf Coast Prairie region.  One species susceptible to this threat is Guadalupe Bass, an economically and ecologically importa

Alligator Gar, Atractosteus spatula, is an iconic species native to lowland floodplain river systems where they play an important role as top predators and by linking landscapes through their movement. Alligator Gar is also an important native fisheries species in the Trinity River.

The southeast United States’ rivers and streams support the most diverse unionid (freshwater mussel) fauna on earth.  These species are a focus of the GCP LCC because their sensitivity to habitat degradation, fish community changes, and changes in water quality and quantity make them akin to the

Habitat fragmentation and degradation are considered to be a leading causes of long-term population declines of Northern Bobwhites and many other species of grassland birds, such as Eastern Meadowlark.  Research is needed to understand the factors causing habitat loss and fragmentation and to ide

Grasslands are among the most threatened ecosystems on the planet (Hoekstra et al 2004). Recently, the bird conservation and grasslands communities have united around a forward looking approach to conservation planning. To accomplish this the following information is needed:

This multi-LCC project is designed to evaluate delivery of existing courses offered through the National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) as “pilots” to enhance expertise needed within the regional context of LCC and Climate Science Center (CSC) communities.

This project proposes development of a spatial decision support system (DSS) designed to address an identified major conservation goal of the Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers Landscape Conservation Cooperative (ETPBR LCC), in collaboration with adjacent LCCs in the Midwestern U.S.

Monarch butterfly and other pollinators are in trouble. Monarch butterfly habitat— including milkweed host plants and nectar food sources—has declined drastically throughout most of the United States.

Extensive mapping of coastal change will provide important baseline information on the distribution and magnitude of landscape changes over the past 41 years. With this analysis, changes can be summarized for different land ownership or other units to assess the extent of recent habitat loss.

This project provides travel support for the collection of precision measurements of prioritized benchmarks and submission of these occupations to NOAA NGS for public access.

The primary goal of this project is to facilitate the completion of ShoreZone mapping of biophysical resources of the coastal supratidal, intertidal, and subtidal areas in the southern Alaska Peninsula, and to make this mapping data web accessible and available to all who request the data.

This project supports the technical development of a mobile application for identifying and reporting invasive plant species in Alaska. The app will be available for both Android and iOS operating systems.

This project supports the development of a key for identifying non-natives plant species, which will be incorporated into a mobile application for identifying and reporting invasive plant species in Alaska.

Working within the constraints of the SWAP revision timeline, we propose to advance biodiversity conservation within the region by enhancing the regional effectiveness of SWAPs and the ability of the LCC to address regional biodiversity priorities.

This project will expand an existing fine-scale storm surge model for the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta. Results will be used to examine the relationship between storm floods and temporal changes in waterbird abundance and nesting locations.

For management agencies, there is a growing need to understand (1) how climate change affects and will continue to affect wildlife populations of conservation concern, and (2) how the negative Upper Midwest Great Lakes Landscape Conservation Cooperative Request for Funding 2013 demographic effect

Storm winds can create water surges that inundate coastal margins. The formation of ice berms can limit or enhance the impact of storm surge.

Nearshore bathymetry is a vital link that joins offshore water depths to coastal topography.

Forest-dominated landscapes provide a wide range of ecosystem services to many different sectors of society, including forest products (e.g., timber), recreational opportunities and support of tourism, carbon sequestration, and habitat for fish and wildlife and other biodiversity.

This project will use ShoreZone imagery collected as part of another partnership effort to map nearly 1,600 km of coastline between Wales and Kotzebue, completing the Kotzebue Sound shoreline for inclusion in the state-wide ShoreZone dataset.

The primary goals of this proposed project are to help identify and prioritize threats to endangered mussels and to determine whether existing environmental concentrations of ammonia, copper, and major ions in sediment pore-water are contributing to the decline of native mussel populations, as in

This project will use existing ShoreZone coastal imagery to map 719 km of shoreline in Bristol Bay, from Cape Constantine to Cape Newenham. This section of coastline is an extremely important herring spawning area and an important component of the Bristol Bay fisheries

Great Lakes coastal wetlands provide critical habitat for many species of birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians, and provide essential spawning and nursery habitat for many fish species of ecologic and economic importance.

This project directly addresses the need for integration of climate change information and strategies into Wisconsin’s Wildlife Action Plan (WWAP) as identified by Upper Midwest and Great Lakes Land Conservation Cooperative.

The emerald ash borer (EAB) poses a tremendous threat to ash forest habitats across the upper Great Lakes.

With the ultimate goal of conserving and restoring threatened native grassland prairies and the wildlife that depend on them, the National Audubon Society (Audubon) is facilitating a landscape conservation design for the grassland birds in the greater Chicago region.

This project establishes a permafrost observation network at the continuous/discontinuous permafrost boundary of the Western Alaska LCC.

This project will improve tribal and First Nation engagement in cooperative natural resource conservation efforts.  Researchers are fostering networking among tribes, First Nations and other relevant partners in the upper Midwest – Great Lakes region, and engaging tribal and First Nation represen

The lake and lagoon surface temperature trends and projections that result from this project will fill a fundamental data gap in western Alaska and will be valuable to scientists and land managers for climate change studies, habitat evaluations, and land and resource management decision making.

The study seeks to provide a retrospective analysis of the relationships among bird abundance and distribution and changes in land cover and climate in the upper Midwest and Great Lakes region.  The resultant models will be used to provide spatially explicit forecasts of future avian responses. 

This project will provide an understanding of how precipitation patterns interact with watershed topography to control stream water sources and thermal regimes.