Projects By Category: Consevation design

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives use a collaborative approach to identify landscape-scale conservation solutions. LCCs work across jurisdictional and political boundaries to work with partners to: meet unfilled conservation needs, develop decision support tools, share data and knowledge and facilitate and foster partnerships.

As part of a shared science strategy, LCCs coordinate closely with the National Climate Change and Wildlife Center and the eight regional Climate Science Centers as well as Migratory Bird Joint Ventures and National Fish Habitat Partnerships across North America.

  • Appalachian

Assessing Future Energy Development across the Appalachian LCC used models that combined data on energy development trends and identified where these may intersect with important natural resource and ecosystem services to give a more comprehensive picture of what potential energy development coul

  • Gulf Coastal Plains and Ozarks

The Conservation Blueprint provides a foundation to design strategies for collaborative conservation effort to achieve sustainable landscapes in the face of change.

  • Caribbean

Purpose of the PA-CAT:To provide information and guidance in support of establishment and management of comprehensive protected areas systems in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Role/Tasks:

  • Caribbean

An urgent problem that we, the Caribbean conservation community, need to address is how best to allocate scarce resources to conservation initiatives directed at cays.

  • Caribbean

Project Vision and BackgroundThe Caribbean Landscape Conservation Cooperative (CLCC) is developing shared conservation priorities to guide their individual and collective conservation actions.

  • California

This project will build on a nascent Landscape Connectivity Network facilitated by Pepperwood and comprised of land trusts, parks and open space districts, with state and federal land managers.

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes

Indiana’s State Wildlife Action Plan was completed in 2005. The plan identified Indiana’s priority needs for all fish and wildlife species and priority efforts to address those needs. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) developed a network of Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs).

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes

Aging infrastructure is creating a pressing national need to align priorities between civil engineering and other interests.  Restoring ecological connectivity of river networks that are fragmented by dams and road crossings has become a prominent objective for environmental managers across the c

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes

This project addressed regional climate change effects on aquatic food webs in the Great Lakes.

  • North Atlantic

In response to the threats of land use and changing environmental conditions, the North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) and the Northeast Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (NEAFWA) coordinated a team of partners from 13 states, the U.S.

  • South Atlantic

This request is in support of the Southeast Natural Resource Leaders Group (SENRLG) Landscape Conservation and Restoration Pilot Project.

  • North Atlantic

With support from the North Atlantic LCC and Hurricane Sandy Disaster Mitigation funds the North Atlantic Aquatic Connectivity Collaborative (www.streamcontinuity.org) has developed a regional crossing assessment protocol and database, scoring systems

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

The GCP LCC Steering Committee tasked the GCP LCC Science Team to reduce to 25 a list Surrogate Species (from a long list of Priority, and Focal Species) for use in conservation planning.

  • Appalachian

A collaborative research project sponsored by the National Park Service and the Appalachian LCC seeks to integrate cultural resources, such as historic bridges and Civil War Battlefields, into landscape conservation planning and design to emphasize both natural and cultural resources in defining

  • North Atlantic

This project highlights the potential for LCCs to facilitate collaboration among conservation practitioners and research scientists to plan for the future.

  • Gulf Coastal Plains and Ozarks

This project links downscaled climate data to an ecosystem model (LINKAGES) to a landscape simulator (LANDIS) to wildlife models (HSI). Collectively, these models offer a means to assess the response of wildlife to climate change - mediated through habitat.

  • California

This project used species distribution modeling, population genetics, and geospatial analysis of historical vs. modern vertebrate populations to identify climate change refugia and population connectivity across the Sierra Nevada.

  • California

This project helps the Central Valley Joint Venture (CVJV) track gains and losses of key bird and waterfowl habitats at a landscape scale. This will allow the CVJV to effectively monitor and evaluate habitats essential to conservation planning for wildlife species.

  • California

California’s native fishes are mostly endemic, with no place to go as climate change increases water temperatures and alters stream flows. Many of the alien fishes, however, are likely to benefit from the effects of climate change.

  • California

This project completed a Conservation Lands Network for biodiversity preservation which includes an on-line decision support tool, a GIS database, a computer software for finer scale planning, and a report card template. Project results may be found at The Conservation Lands Network website.