Projects By Product: Pilot or Case Study

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives use a collaborative approach to identify landscape scale conservation solutions. LCCs work across jurisdictional and political boundaries to work with partners to: meet unfilled conservation needs, develop decision support tools, share data and knowledge, and facilitate and foster partnerships.

As part of a shared science strategy, LCCs coordinate closely with the National Climate Change and Wildlife Center and the eight regional Climate Science Centers.

Assessing Future Energy Development across the Appalachian LCC used models that combined data on energy development trends and identified where these may intersect with important natural resource and ecosystem services to give a more comprehensive picture of what potential energy development coul

To enhance the chances of restoring and protecting Puerto Rico’s beaches by synthesizing guidelines and procedures on beach characterization and profiling, planting, fertilization, irrigation, maintenance, monitoring, etc.

The 6 week project entails using acoustic monitoring technology to provide new information on native and endemic bats of Puerto Rico toward three specific objectives listed below. Dr. Vulinec will work with USFWS, USFS, PR-DNRE, and CLCC personnel to accomplish our shared goals.

An urgent problem that we, the Caribbean conservation community, need to address is how best to allocate scarce resources to conservation initiatives directed at cays.

This pilot project will assist the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (SALCC) identify issues dealing with the integration of natural and cultural resource sustainability and recommend optimal strategies for solving impacts associated with landscape stressors like climate change, i

This project seeks to develop a tool that strategically identifies priority areas for land protection. This is a pilot study to assess the extent of taxa that contain adequate genetic sampling within the south Atlantic ecoregion for characterization of intraspecific genetic variation.

With support from the North Atlantic LCC and Hurricane Sandy Disaster Mitigation funds the North Atlantic Aquatic Connectivity Collaborative (www.streamcontinuity.org) has developed a regional crossing assessment protocol and database, scoring systems

The Monarch’s View of a City project will lay the groundwork for design principles to guide the development, testing and deployment of future urban conservation for the Monarch butterfly across the Eastern half of the country.

In June 2015, the Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) granted $80,000 to the City of St.

Monarch butterfly and other pollinators are in trouble. Monarch butterfly habitat— including milkweed host plants and nectar food sources—has declined drastically throughout most of the United States.

In the tropics, ample freshwater is the primary resource supporting thriving human and ecological communities. In the Pacific Islands, many watersheds are threatened by climate change, urban encroachment, and invasion by water-demanding exotic plant species like strawberry guava (SG).

Foster cross-boundary integration and synthesis of landscape conservation design efforts across LCCs by 1) identifying opportunities and challenges in alternative methodologies for making individual LCC's design efforts compatible and 2) to implement a pilot effort to demonstrate these '

This project highlights the potential for LCCs to facilitate collaboration among conservation practitioners and research scientists to plan for the future.

Ecosystem services provided by floodplains include removal of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediments, and sequestration of carbon. Effectiveness of floodplains in providing these services is dependent on the extent and location of connection between floodplain and river.

Overgrazing and fire suppression have led to a loss of deep soils and vegetative cover in the 420,000 acre Alamosa Creek watershed in southwestern New Mexico.

Construct enclosures at Columbia Mine to house approximately 60 turtles (translocated animals) that were collected off of the right-of-way for sections 2 and 4 of I-69.