Projects By Product: Training, Outreach, or Workshop

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives use a collaborative approach to identify landscape scale conservation solutions. LCCs work across jurisdictional and political boundaries to work with partners to: meet unfilled conservation needs, develop decision support tools, share data and knowledge, and facilitate and foster partnerships.

As part of a shared science strategy, LCCs coordinate closely with the National Climate Change and Wildlife Center and the eight regional Climate Science Centers.

Future climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies will be dependent on the best available projections of how the regional climate will change and the impacts those changes will have on the region’s natural and cultural resources.

Given the rapid environmental change experienced and expected across the Appalachians, it will be crucial to understand the vulnerabilities of valued ecosystem services to drivers of large-scale change that may threaten their sustainability.

This workshop introduced and demonstrated key concepts and a series of software tools, whichallow managers, biologists, and conservationists to efficiently evaluate predictors of wildlife space-use and generate spatial models based on that analysis.

The Climate Science Alliance - South Coast is a partnership formed to develop and support a network of conservation leaders, scientists, and natural resource managers focused on sharing ecosystem-based resiliency approaches to safeguard our communities and natural resources from climate change ri

This project uses existing decision support tools (DST) in a scenario planning analysis for the South Bay Salt Ponds Restoration Project (SBSPRP) as a case study that other bayland managers can reference for best practices for using these DSTs for adaptation planning.

Phases 1-3 (2010-2012): This project developed landscape change scenarios based upon water availability and precipitation and temperature patterns projected from downscaled models and investigated impacts of these changes on habitats and ecology of waterfowl, shorebirds, and other waterbirds in t

This project brought together natural resource managers, conservation coordinators and planners, and scientists working at multiple scales within the San Francisco Bay to develop a spatially-explicit decision framework that cuts across jurisdictional boundaries while accounting for uncertainties

Project Goal The goal of this project is two-fold: 1) to increase the understanding of how meadow restoration impacts hydrology and 2) to inform management and investment decisions around using restoration as a tool to build resilience under climate change.

Most natural resource managers, planners and policy makers are now dependent upon spatially explicit environmental suitability and spatial allocation analyses to inform policy and management decisions.

A century of fire exclusion across many forest types in the western U.S. has resulted in unforeseen changes, including high fuel accumulations, high densities of trees, and increasing dominance of fire-intolerant species.

This project will implement climate-smart restoration planning and practices for forest landscapes in the Rogue Basin.

The Cascadia Parner Forum fosters a network of natural resource practitioners working with the NPLCC and GNLCC to guild the adaptive capacity of the landscape and species living within it.

WildLinks 2011 Conference brought together transboundary scientists and managers to share information on the latest science , policies, and efforts to address climate adaptation for species and habitats on both sides of the border.

The goal of the project is to help more efficiently achieve a resilient Appalachian forest landscape within the NALCC geography that is built upon a broadly shared vision for a sustainable, connected mosaic of forest habitats and waters that are home to thriving intact ecosystems and human commun

In response to the threats of land use and changing environmental conditions, the North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) and the Northeast Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (NEAFWA) coordinated a team of partners from 13 states, the U.S.

The Northeast Regional Conservation Framework Workshop, held in June 2011, provided an opportunity to step back and synthesize the results of many projects that have been completed or are underway through the Northeast Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Regional Conservation Needs (RCN) pr

This agreement supported the Regional Conservation Opportunity Areas project, later renamed "Nature's Network," of the North Atlantic LCC partnership.

FY2014
Recent drought, change agents and the spectrum of greater management needs have highlighted the relative dearth of in situ weather and climate measurement stations in the Great Basin. Thus, interest has grown in supplementing or initiating atmospheric and hydrologic measurements.

FY2016
This project will address limited tribal capacity for vulnerability assessment by providing guidance and data tailored to the needs and capacities of Northwest and Great Basin tribes. Specifically, the project will:

FY2014
Workshops that provide tribal representatives with an introduction to planning for climate change impacts.

The Alaska Coastal Rainforest Center (ACRC) lead a second workshop to develop cross-boundary geospatial and climate data sets in support of regional conservation applications in the coastal temperate rainforest zone of Southeast Alaska and British Columbia.

The North Pacific LCC co-sponsored the April 2012 science symposium - Coastal Temperate Rainforests: Integrating Communities, Climate Science, and Resource Management.

The North Pacific LCC helped sponsor the Second Annual Pacific Northwest Climate Science Conference. This two day, regional conference included a panel discussion on federal climate science endeavors in the Pacific NW.

WDFW will use funds provided by the NPLCC to integrate climate change impacts and implications into our State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) Revision.

WDFW will use funds provided by the NPLCC to integrate climate change impacts and implications into our State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) Revision.

Research on coastal change in Cook Inlet and South East Alaska has increased rapidly in recent years, making it challenging to track existing projects, understand their cumulative insights, gauge remaining research gaps, and prioritize future work.

Research on coastal change in Cook Inlet and South East Alaska has increased rapidly in recent years, making it challenging to track existing projects, understand their cumulative insights, gauge remaining research gaps, and prioritize future work.

This project supported a bi-national workshop bringing together researchers and practitioners from across the range of the NPLCC.

The Tongass National Forest has identified resources that are important to stakeholders and vulnerable to climate-related stressors. Cooperators will review an action plan and convene a workshop to be held in Southeast Alaska in 2016.

The Tongass National Forest has identified resources that are important to stakeholders and vulnerable to climate-related stressors. Cooperators will review an action plan and convene a workshop to be held in Southeast Alaska in 2016.

WildLinks 2012 brought together transboundary scientists and managers to build on transboundary discussions started during Wildlinks 2010 and 2011 related to climate adaptation for species and habitats on both sides of the border.

This multi-LCC project is designed to evaluate delivery of existing courses offered through the National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) as “pilots” to enhance expertise needed within the regional context of LCC and Climate Science Center (CSC) communities.

The Stoney Nakoda Nation believe that it is important to provide cultural awareness to the Great North Landscape Conservation group so that the group can understand the First Nation history of the study area.

The White House Council for Environmental Quality has identified two national watersheds to pilot large-scale drought resiliency implementation.

Existing climate change science and guidance for restoring and maintaining whitebark pine forests will be evaluated using landscape simulation modeling to inform implementation of the Greater Yellowstone Coordinating Committee (GYCC) Whitebark Pine (WBP) subcommittees WBP Strategy.

In May 2014, the GNLCC Steering Committee approved two pilot projects explore approaches to landscape-scale coordination to enhance science-based management across the GNLCC.

We propose a collaborative project with the USGS, Wyoming State Climate Office, USFWS, USFS, and the NPS whereby we will assemble and maintain long-term records of climate from key stations in and around the Great Northern LCC and subject these records to a rigorous series of QA/QC procedures.

This project is part of an ongoing effort to develop and implement a landscape level decision support system (DSS) across the boundaries of Idaho, Washington, Oregon, and Montana.

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (CTWS) strives to maintain ecological diversity and integrity, while sustaining cultural practices, preserving and improving economic development and promoting higher education opportunities to tribal members.

The Yakama Nation Department of Natural Resources is currently developing a department-wide Climate Adaptation Plan (CAP).

Native fish of the Columbia River Basin, and the ecosystems that support them, are an innate and critical part of Nez Perce culture.

Summary  Conduct an objective assessment of the existing programs monitoring climate-sensitive ecological variables (biological and geophysical) in the terrestrial Hawaiian environment, generate a summary for consideration at an expert workshop, participate in the workshop, and summarize the cons

The objective of this project is to identify areas where herbivore management interventions would be the most effective in promoting coral reef recovery and resiliency following the recent coral bleaching.

Develop an island-wide mangrove adaption and management plan that will incorporate the findings from the comprehensive island-wide mangrove vulnerability assessment that is currently being funded through awards to MCT from the United States DOI Office of Insular Affairs and Fish and Wildlife Serv