Projects By Product: Training, Outreach, or Workshop

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives use a collaborative approach to identify landscape scale conservation solutions. LCCs work across jurisdictional and political boundaries to work with partners to: meet unfilled conservation needs, develop decision support tools, share data and knowledge, and facilitate and foster partnerships.

As part of a shared science strategy, LCCs coordinate closely with the National Climate Change and Wildlife Center and the eight regional Climate Science Centers.

FY2014Recent drought, change agents and the spectrum of greater management needs have highlighted the relative dearth of in situ weather and climate measurement stations in the Great Basin. Thus, interest has grown in supplementing or initiating atmospheric and hydrologic measurements.

FY2016This project will address limited tribal capacity for vulnerability assessment by providing guidance and data tailored to the needs and capacities of Northwest and Great Basin tribes. Specifically, the project will:

FY2015Researchers conducted interviews with sagebrush land managers from Oregon, Idaho and Utah to identify the most relevant variables, threats and management strategies relevant to their specific sagebrush management areas.

FY2016Develop and utilize both correlative and experimental approaches to evaluate effects of different intensities of spring cattle grazing on sage-grouse habitat selection, insect abundance, and sage-grouse demographic and behavioral traits.

FY2015The Great Basin Region, which covers much of Nevada, and portions of California, Oregon, Idaho, and Utah, managers are already confronting a changing climate and are beginning to make management decisions despite uncertainty in how climate change effects will manifest in the region.

FY2014Workshops that provide tribal representatives with an introduction to planning for climate change impacts.

FY2015This project assesses the efficacy of ACK55, a naturally occurring bacterium that decreases invasive annual grasses by up to 70% on test sites.

WDFW will use funds provided by the NPLCC to integrate climate change impacts and implications into our State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) Revision.

Research on coastal change in Cook Inlet and South East Alaska has increased rapidly in recent years, making it challenging to track existing projects, understand their cumulative insights, gauge remaining research gaps, and prioritize future work.

This project supported a bi-national workshop bringing together researchers and practitioners from across the range of the NPLCC.

The Tongass National Forest has identified resources that are important to stakeholders and vulnerable to climate-related stressors. Cooperators will review an action plan and convene a workshop to be held in Southeast Alaska in 2016.

The Tongass National Forest has identified resources that are important to stakeholders and vulnerable to climate-related stressors. Cooperators will review an action plan and convene a workshop to be held in Southeast Alaska in 2016.

WildLinks 2012 brought together transboundary scientists and managers to build on transboundary discussions started during Wildlinks 2010 and 2011 related to climate adaptation for species and habitats on both sides of the border.

This multi-LCC project is designed to evaluate delivery of existing courses offered through the National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) as “pilots” to enhance expertise needed within the regional context of LCC and Climate Science Center (CSC) communities.

Summary  Conduct an objective assessment of the existing programs monitoring climate-sensitive ecological variables (biological and geophysical) in the terrestrial Hawaiian environment, generate a summary for consideration at an expert workshop, participate in the workshop, and summarize the cons

The objective of this project is to identify areas where herbivore management interventions would be the most effective in promoting coral reef recovery and resiliency following the recent coral bleaching.

Develop an island-wide mangrove adaption and management plan that will incorporate the findings from the comprehensive island-wide mangrove vulnerability assessment that is currently being funded through awards to MCT from the United States DOI Office of Insular Affairs and Fish and Wildlife Serv

Hawaiian forest birds are imperiled, with fewer than half the original > 40 species remaining extant.

Recent studies show that past and ongoing environmental changes have been substantial and have likely already affected conservation efforts in Hawaii.

Background: Climate velocity is a concept derived from the intersection between ecology and climate change.

Conservation efforts in isolated archipelagos such as Hawai’i often focus on habitat-based conservation and restoration efforts that benefit multiple species. Unfortunately, identifying locations where such efforts are safer from climatic shifts is still challenging.

In conservation, one challenge of climate change adaptation is that acting on projected long-term climatic threats requires two ‘leaps’ by managers: 1) Acting on climate-based inf

·       Anticipating potential shifts in plant communities has been a major challenge in climate-change ecology.

Science delivery program to make marsh and coastal resiliency information and tools easily available to decision makers at scales and formats needed delivery network through MARCO to Mid-Atlantic coastal states and communities as well as beach and marsh restoration, protection and management deci

Science delivery program to make marsh and coastal resiliency information and tools easily available to decision makers at scales and formats needed delivery network through NROC to Northeastern coastal states and communities as well as beach and marsh restoration, protection and management decis

Training for states and towns to collaboratively increase resiliency and improve standards for culverts and road stream crossings to future floods while restoring aquatic connectivity.

The Red River Stakeholder Engagement project’s primary objective was to uncover areas of concern for stakeholders who live, work, and play along the Red River Basin. It examined the complexity of the cultural-geographic landscape across the Red River Basin.

The Rio Grande/Río Bravo is the lifeline of the region, including the Chihuahuan Desert, supplying drinking water for more than 6 million people, including numerous Native American tribes, and irrigating about 2 million acres of land.

The primary objective of this project is to develop a short synthesis report assessing 11 habitats, using a variety of ecological indicators.

We connect science and people. This July 9 - 10, 2014, the LCC will host its second Connections Workshop in Billings, Montana, to promote continued collaboration between scientists, managers, communicators and policy experts.

The EPiC / Urban Conservation Core Team is a small group of volunteers that provides leadership and direction for the EPiC / Urban Conservation Technical Advisory Group.

Monarch butterfly habitat—including milkweed host plants and nectar food sources—has declined drastically throughout most of the United States.

The Floodplain Forest Workshop that was held in Dubuque on September 15-17, 2015. The agenda included presentations and discussions regarding floodplain forest issues ranging from system level influences to floodplain forest threats to site level management.

Native Nations face unique challenges related to climate change, many of which are detailed in recent reports as part of the U.S. National Climate Assessment (Bennett et al. 2014; Hiza Redsteer et al.

The Desert LCC will provide the 50% of the Federal component of funds, and the work designed will support the science objectives for the Desert LCC and its partners as well as provide needed improvements to the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) in the Lower Colorado River Region, and beyond.

There are few resources that provide managers cross-scale information for planning climate adaptation strategies for species and taxa at risk. Appropriate allocation of resources requires an understanding of mechanisms influencing a species’ risk to global change. Dr.

In June 2015, the Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) granted $80,000 to the City of St.

Grasslands are among the most threatened ecosystems on the planet (Hoekstra et al 2004). Recently, the bird conservation and grasslands communities have united around a forward looking approach to conservation planning. To accomplish this the following information is needed:

Monarch butterfly and other pollinators are in trouble. Monarch butterfly habitat— including milkweed host plants and nectar food sources—has declined drastically throughout most of the United States.

Storm tides can influence salinity concentrations of ponds on Kigigak Island, which can affect the breeding population of Spectacled Eider found there. This project will expand instrumentation currently collecting data related to pond water levels and salinities, and tidal dynamics.

This project supports the development of a key for identifying non-natives plant species, which will be incorporated into a mobile application for identifying and reporting invasive plant species in Alaska.

Mid-winter icing events have the potential to lead to population declines of caribou due to restricted access to forage.

Many areas of western Alaska lack snowpack and snow condition data, including the prime winter range for the Western Arctic Caribou Herd.

This project will produce an existing land cover/dominate specie(s) map at 30m resolution for the entire Western Alaska LCC region.

This project supports invasive plant surveys in Bristol Bay communities.

This project evaluates the connections between climate change impacts and health in 3 Bristol Bay communities: Nondalton, a lake community, Levelock, a river community, and Pilot Point, a coastal community.

This project will support data collection in the Bering Sea from a Triaxys oceanographic wave buoy to supplement existing stationary sensors.

This project will result in a complete, mean high water, digital shoreline for coastal Western Alaska stretching from Cape Prince of Wales to Cape Espenberg.