Resources

LCCs have produced a wealth of informational documents, reports, fact sheets, webinars and more to help support resource managers in designing and delivering conservation at landscape scales.

These 26 climate envelope models and associated "read me" file are described in the final report for the LCC-funded project, "Climate Envelope Models in Support of Landscape Conservation." These climate envelope models describe the climate where each species currently lives and then map the geographic shift of that range under climate change. Multiple climage change scenarios inform these models.

Date posted: October 11, 2018

The Western Gulf Coast provides important habitat for migratory and resident waterfowl. The mottled duck(*Anas fulvigula*) relies on this region for all of its life-cycle events. Its relatively small population, limited worldwide range, and generally declining population trajectory has earned it a “Red” status on the Audubon WatchList and is a species of concern among state and federal agencies.

Date posted: October 3, 2018

Submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) provides many critical ecosystem services, yet we lack basic information on SAV assemblages, biomass and diversity across expansive coasts such as the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGoM).

Date posted: September 29, 2018

Identifying distributions of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) across the northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) coastal landscape necessitates describing ecological processes in estuarine gradients. SAV assemblages are ecological indicators of aquatic ecosystem health; spatial and temporal distributions are strongly correlated to environmental conditions. Many wildlife species, including waterfowl, are dependent on SAV and seeds in NGOM coastal marshes for food and habitat.

Date posted: September 29, 2018
Preview image of LCD-Recommended-Practices-v1-092818.pdf

This is a practitioner’s guide to landscape conservation design (LCD) leverages the knowledge, years of collaborative-focused experiences on landscape-scale conservation issues, and the legacy of the LCCs to provide practical guidance to anyone looking to facilitate or participate in an LCD process.

The guide contains five sections covering major themes in LCD. Each section describes vetted practices that one or more LCCs used in their LCD work; provides resources for further information; and presents a case study where the practices have been implemented.

Date posted: September 28, 2018
Preview image of Eastern Mojave April 2018 Partner Workshop Report.pdf

A workshop was held for the Eastern Mojave Conservation Collaborative at Clark County Wetlands Park in Las Vegas, NV, on April 10-11, 2018.

Date posted: September 25, 2018

The Southeast Conservation Blueprint is a a map of shared conservation and restoration priorities across the Southeast and Caribbean. The priority categories represent the level of value---high or medium---of healthy natural resources and their potential to benefit fish, wildlife and plants. This Blueprint is a product of the Southeast Conservation Adaptation Strategy (SECAS).

Date posted: September 25, 2018

The impacts from climate change are increasing the possibility of vulnerable coastal species and habitats crossing critical thresholds that could spur rapid and possibly irreversible changes. For species of high conservation concern, improved knowledge of quantitative thresholds could greatly improve management. To meet this need, we synthesized information pertaining to biological responses as tipping points to sea level rise (SLR) and coastal storms for 45 fish, wildlife, and plant species along the U.S.

Date posted: September 24, 2018

The Northeast United States and Atlantic Canada share many of the same types of forests, wetlands, and natural communities, and from a wildlife perspective the region is one contiguous forest. However, resources are classified and mapped differently on the two sides of the border, creating challenges for habitat evaluation, species modeling, and predicting the effects of climate change.

Date posted: September 14, 2018

To create a wall-to-wall surface of landscape permeability we used the software CIRCUITSCAPE (McRae and Shah 2009), an innovative program that models species and population movements as if they were electric current flowing through a landscape of variable resistance. Circuit modeling is conceptually aligned with the concept of landscape permeability because it recognizes that movement through a landscape is affected by a variety of impediments, and it quantifies the degree and the directional outcomes of the compounding effects.

Date posted: August 21, 2018

This report describes an effort of a team of 60 scientists led by The Nature Conservancy (TNC) to identify the places where nature’s own natural resilience is the highest. Thanks to the land’s diverse topography, bedrock, and soil, these climate-resilient sites are more likely to sustain native plants, animals, and natural processes into the future, becoming natural strongholds for diversity.

Date posted: August 21, 2018

The Northeast Ecological System dataset was last updated: 7/2014



This dataset represents terrestrial and wetland ecological systems of the Northeast (based on NatureServe's Ecological Systems Classifications) combined with human-modified land types such as roads and agriculture. Download includes Ecosystem Type, Macrogroup, and Formation, you do not need to download each individually.This dataset was created by substantially modifying The Nature Conservancy's Northeast Terrestrial Wildlife Habitat Classification System (NETHCS) using these steps:

Date posted: August 21, 2018

Hydrography represents stream centerlines and off centerlines with greater than 30 hectare flow accumulation for the Northeast region.



This dataset was developed as part of the Designing Sustainable Landscapes project led by Professor Kevin McGarigal of the University of Massachusetts and sponsored by the North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative; for more information about the entire project see: http://www.umass.edu/landeco/research/dsl/dsl.html



Date posted: August 21, 2018

This dataset is a component of a complete package of products from the
Connect the Connecticut project. Connect the Connecticut is a collaborative effort to identify shared priorities for conserving the Connecticut River Watershed for future generations, considering the value of fish and wildlife species and the natural ecosystems they inhabit. Click
here to download the full data package, including all documentation.

Date posted: August 21, 2018

This dataset represents a shaded relief, or hillshade, for the Northern U.S. and Canada. This shaded relief raster was created from a 30 meter Digital Elevation Model (DEM) using the ArcMap geoprocessing tool "hillshade".



The DEM consists of two mosaiced datasets:



1. U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) 30 meter National Elevation Dataset (NED) , ~1 arc-second data that is updated over large areas by integrating the 10 meter or better source data(where available), re-sampled to 1 arc-second.

Date posted: August 21, 2018

1. Climate change vulnerability assessments are commonly used to identify species or populations at risk from global climate change, but few translate impact assessments to climate change adaptation actions. Furthermore, most climate change adaptation efforts emphasize where to implement management actions, whereas timing remains largely overlooked. The rate of modern climate change introduces urgency in evaluating whether delaying conservation actions compromises their efficacy for reaching important conservation targets.

Date posted: August 10, 2018

Pollinator decline and conservation is a complex and challenging issue with the potential to tax the capacity of individual state agencies; a collaborative approach among states and federal agencies has a higher likelihood success in meeting this emerging conservation challenge. Bumble bees have been identified as a particularly imperiled group of important pollinators. To aid the collaborative pollinator conservation effort, this report compiles the most up-to-date information related to bumble bees: threats, best practices for land management, and monitoring protocols into one location.

Date posted: August 10, 2018

Datasets intended to support development of the Multi-LCC Mississippi River Basin/Gulf Hypoxia Initiative's Conservation Blueprint 1.0.

Date posted: August 10, 2018

The ETPBR LCC Steering Committee (SC) consisted of 20-30 representatives from state, federal, tribal, and NGO entities. In December 2012, the LCC Steering Committee began drafting a strategic plan to provide a foundation and structure to carry out the mission and vision of the LCC and its partners. The SC met twice a year from 2012 to 2016 in various locations around the Midwest. Staff worked with the committee and project investigators to compile information for a set of descriptive flyers, posters, presentations, and annual updates.

Date posted: August 10, 2018

Various presentations given on SECAS in 2012.

Date posted: July 28, 2018

Abstract



Context Conservation planning is increasingly using ‘‘coarse filters’’ based on the idea of conserving ‘‘nature’s stage’’. One such approach is based on ecosystems and the concept of ecological integrity, although myriad ways exist to measure ecological integrity.


Date posted: July 17, 2018

These datasets are part of a suite of products from the Nature’s Network project. Nature’s Network is a collaborative effort to identify shared priorities for conservation in the Northeast, considering the value of fish and wildlife species and the natural areas they inhabit.

Date posted: July 17, 2018

Rivers and streams are highly vulnerable to fragmentation from roads due to their prevalence in the landscape. Road-stream crossings are far more numerous than other anthropogenic barriers such as dams; these crossing structures (culverts, bridges, fords, and tide gates) have been demonstrated to impede the passage of aquatic organisms. However, road-stream crossings vary widely in the extent to which they serve as a barrier. It is important to identify barrier severity to facilitate prioritization of restoration activities, since proactively addressing all structures is not feasible.

Date posted: July 14, 2018

These datasets depict three zones of uncertainty in the predicted future distribution of 28 representative species based on climate suitability, given the projected climate in 2080 (averaged across RPC 4.5 and 8.5 climate scenarios). The “Zone of Persistence” represents those areas where the species is expected to continue to occur through 2080. The “Zone of Contraction” represents those areas that are currently suitable from a climate perspective but where the 2080 climate is projected to be no longer suitable.

Date posted: July 14, 2018

This project integrated a map-based interface into the Alaska Department of Fish and Game's Community Subsistence Information System to provide for simple navigation, and representation of the availability of information by type, time series, and location.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

Existing stream temperature data will be compiled from numerous federal, state, tribal, and private sources to develop an integrated regional database. Spatial statistical models for river networks will be applied to these data to develop an accurate model that predicts stream temperature for all fish-bearing streams in the US portion of the NPLCC. Differences between model outputs for historic and future climate scenarios will be used to assess spatial variation in the vulnerability of sensitive fish species across the NPLCC.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

The intent of this project was to create a directory of academic climate change scientists that focus on the North Pacific Coast of North America—including California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, British Columbia, and Alaska. The University of Washington developed the California, Oregon, Washington, and Idaho portion of the directory and Alaska Coastal Rainforest Center developed the British Columbia and Alaska portion of the directory. Funding was provided by the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NPLCC) and the Northwest Climate Science Center (NWCSC).

Date posted: June 27, 2018

The Alaska Coastal Rainforest Center (ACRC) held a symposium titled "Coastal Temperate Rainforests: Integrating Science, Resource Management, and Communities" on April 17‐19, 2012, in Juneau, Alaska. The three day event included an all‐day field trip to Berner's Bay (north of Juneau), an international plenary, three concurrent sessions, two lunch‐time keynote speakers, an evening open public reception, an evening science social, and an evening banquet.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

Existing stream temperature data will be compiled from numerous federal, state, tribal, and private sources to develop an integrated regional database. Spatial statistical models for river networks will be applied to these data to develop an accurate model that predicts stream temperature for all fish-bearing streams in the US portion of the NPLCC. Differences between model outputs for historic and future climate scenarios will be used to assess spatial variation in the vulnerability of sensitive fish species across the NPLCC.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

The workshop “How to Adapt to Climate Change” was held on May 10, 2015 at the University of Victoria by B.C. Parks and Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium (PCIC). The goal of this workshop was to introduce protected area managers to the concept of rapid assessment and conceptual modelling for adaptation to climate change. It was led by Tory Stevens (B.C. Parks) and Trevor Murdoch (PCIC).

Date posted: June 27, 2018

Existing stream temperature data will be compiled from numerous federal, state, tribal, and private sources to develop an integrated regional database. Spatial statistical models for river networks will be applied to these data to develop an accurate model that predicts stream temperature for all fish-bearing streams in the US portion of the NPLCC. Differences between model outputs for historic and future climate scenarios will be used to assess spatial variation in the vulnerability of sensitive fish species across the NPLCC.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

Wetlands in the remote mountains of the western US have undergone two massive ecological “experiments” spanning the 20th century. Beginning in the late 1800s and expanding after World War II, fish and wildlife managers intentionally introduced millions of predatory trout (primarily Oncorhynchus spp) into fishless mountain ponds and lakes across the western states. These new top predators, which now occupy 95% of large mountain lakes, have limited the habitat distributions of native frogs, salamanders, and wetland invertebrates to smaller, more ephemeral ponds where trout do not survive.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

The primary objective of the research is to develop a rule-based decision support system to predict the relative vulnerability of nearshore species to climate change. The approach is designed to be applicable to fishes and invertebrates with limited data by predicting risk from readily avialable data, including species' biogeographic distributions and natural history attributes.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

This report provides a first-ever compilation of what is known—and not known—about climate change effects on marine and coastal ecosystems in the geographic extent of the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NPLCC). The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service funded this report to help inform members of the newly established NPLCC as they assess priorities and begin operations. Production of this report was guided by University of Washington’s Climate Impacts Group and information was drawn from more than 250 documents and more than 100 interviews.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

Wetlands are globally important ecosystems that provide critical services for natural communities and human society, such as water storage and filtration, wildlife habitat, agriculture, recreation, nutrient cycling, and carbon sequestration. They are also considered to be among the most sensitive ecosystems to climate change, which will exacerbate the already threatened nature of wetlands due to changes in land-use.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

This report provides a compilation of what is known – and not known – about climate change effects on terrestrial ecosystems in the geographic extent of the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NPLCC). Where a broader regional context is needed, we also present information from surrounding areas. The NPLCC funded this report to help inform members of the NPLCC as they assess priorities and continue operations.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

This report provides a first-ever compilation of what is known—and not known—about climate change effects on freshwater aquatic and riparian ecosystems in the geographic extent of the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NPLCC). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service funded this report to help inform members of the newly established NPLCC as they assess priorities and begin operations. Production of this report was guided by University of Washington’s Climate Impacts Group and information was drawn from more than 250 documents and more than 100 interviews.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

The primary objective of the research is to develop a rule-based decision support system to predict the relative vulnerability of nearshore species to climate change. The approach is designed to be applicable to fishes and invertebrates with limited data by predicting risk from readily avialable data, including species' biogeographic distributions and natural history attributes.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

This final progress report describes the completion of the objectives of U.S. FWS Agreement Number F11AP00032 (Agreement) – Moving from Impacts to Action: Expert Focus Groups for Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Strategies in Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems of the North Pacific LCC – and Modification No. 001 to said Agreement – Identifying and Synthesizing Climate Change Effects, Adaptation Approaches, and Science Opportunities in the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative’s (NPLCC) Terrestrial Ecosystems. 

Date posted: June 27, 2018

This dataset depicts the terrestrial boundaries of the Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCC) within Alaska. Those LCCs are: Aleutian and Bering Sea Islands, Arctic, North Pacific, Northwest Boreal, and Western Alaska. These boundaries are derived from the master LCC Boundary dataset maintained by USFWS, but portions of these polygons have been modified. The specific modification are listed below:
ARCTIC LCC: Portions of the polygon were edited to more closely match the coastline and the boundary was also edited to include the Colville River.

Date posted: June 24, 2018

Polar bears along Alaska's Beaufort Sea frequently give birth to young in land-based snow dens.
These dens are established in November, typically in deep snowdrifts that have developed in the
lee of cut-banks found along streams, rivers, and the coast. Durner et al. (2001, 2006) indicated
that, for 24 known land den sites, the local slopes ranged from 15 to 50° and were 1.3 to 34 m
high. The dens faced all directions but east. They published a distribution map based on habitat

Date posted: June 24, 2018

The Arctic Shorebird Demographic Network (Network) is an
international collaboration dedicated to gaining a better
understanding of why arctic-nesting shorebirds are in decline
and determine which life history stage (i.e., breeding success vs.
adult survival) is limiting shorebird population growth or
driving declines.

Date posted: June 24, 2018

Average historical annual total precipitation, projected total precipitation (inches), and relative change in total precipitation (% change from baseline) for Northern Alaska. GIF formatted animation and PNG images. Maps created using the SNAP 5-GCM composite (AR5-RCP 6.0) and CRU TS3.1.01 datasets.

Date posted: June 24, 2018

To better understand and predict effects of climate change on wetlands, invertebrates and shorebirds, the 'CEWISH' group,
composed of Cryohydrology, Invertebrate, Shorebird Food Use, and Shorebird/Population Modeling teams, collected field
data at Barrow, Alaska, between May and September 2014–2015. The Cryohydrology team measured end-of-winter
snow accumulation, snowmelt at the landscape scale, pond water levels, and pond water and sediment temperatures. The

Date posted: June 24, 2018

The Pacific Loon is the most common breeding loon in Arctic Alaska, nesting throughout much
of the state (Russell 2002). This species typically breeds on lakes that are ≥1 ha in size in both
boreal and tundra habitats. They are primarily piscivorous although they are known to commonly
feed chicks invertebrates (D. Rizzolo and J. Schmutz, unpublished data). Many Pacific Loons
spend their winters in offshore waters of the west coast of Canada and the U.S. (Russell 2002).

Date posted: June 24, 2018

Baseline (1961-1990) average annual temperature in and projected change in temperature for for the northern portion of Alaska. The Alaska portion of the Arctic LCC's terrestrial boundary is depicted by the black line. Baseline results for 1961-1990 are derived from Climate Research Unit (CRU) TS3.1 data and downscaled to 2km grids; results for the other time periods (2010-2039, 2040-2069, 2070-2099) are based on the SNAP 5-GCM composite using the AR5-RCP 6.0, downscaled to 2km grids.

Date posted: June 24, 2018