Resources

LCCs have produced a wealth of informational documents, reports, fact sheets, webinars and more to help support resource managers in designing and delivering conservation at landscape scales.

The spatial products described here rate the ecological integrity of six broadly defined habitats (Table 1-1; Appendix Table A-1). We selected these habitats as conservation targets for the Edwards to Gulf Landscape Conservation Design (LCD) through a participatory process (Tarbox et al. 2018). We then conducted a viability assessment of each habitat by identifying their key ecological attributes (KEAs), and appropriate indicators. We assessed the status of KEAs to determine the ecological integrity of each habitat type (FOS 2013).

Date posted: October 9, 2019

The spatial products described here prioritize different types of conservation actions for six broadly defined habitats (Table 1-1; Appendix Table A-1). We identified these habitat types as the conservation targets of the Edwards to Gulf Landscape Conservation Design (LCD) through a participatory process (Tarbox et al. 2018). We then conducted a viability assessment of each conservation target by identifying their key ecological attributes (KEAs), and appropriate indicators. We then assessed the status of KEAs to determine the ecological integrity of each habitat type (FOS 2013).

Date posted: October 9, 2019

The Edwards to Gulf Conservation Blueprint represents a participatory effort to develop a suite of decision support tools that facilitate cooperation between conservation partners in the region. The blueprint was created in a transparent and iterative process, building upon a previously existing coarse filter blueprint to generate a fine filter by increasing the spatial resolution, and number and variety of indicators used.

Date posted: October 9, 2019

Situated in the Mississippi Alluvial Plain of the Gulf Coast Prairie Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GCP LCC), the Chitimacha Tribe is one of four federally recognized tribes in Louisiana. The Tribal seat, trust lands/ reservation, and adjacent Tribal owned lands are located near Charenton, Louisiana, totaling nearly 1,000 acres. The Chitimacha, with a population of approximately 1,400 people, are currently impacted by storm surge, which is expected to increase with climate change.

Date posted: October 9, 2019

The northern bobwhite Colinus virginianus has experienced range-wide declines over the past several decades, primarily due to habitat loss and habitat fragmentation. As northern bobwhite populations continue to decline, there is a need for studies that address the impact of habitat changes on population persistence at multiple spatial scales. Our goal was to assess changes in habitat and land use related to northern bobwhite declines across multiple spatial scales in Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana. We determined northern bobwhite trends for 1972–2012 using Breeding Bird Survey data.

Date posted: October 9, 2019

Prymnesium parvum (golden alga, GA) is a toxigenic harmful alga native to marine ecosystems that has also affected brackish inland waters. The first toxic bloom of GA in the western hemisphere occurred in the Pecos River, one of the saltiest rivers in North America. Environmental factors (water quality) associated with GA occurrence in this basin, however, have not been examined. Water quality and GA presence and abundance were determined at eight sites in the Pecos River basin with or without prior history of toxic blooms. Sampling was conducted monthly from January 2012 to July 2013.

Date posted: September 24, 2019

Sagebrush steppe map

Date posted: August 27, 2019

Species occurrence data

Date posted: August 27, 2019

Summary notes from workshop 1.

Date posted: August 27, 2019

The Southern Rockies LCC is home to narrowleaf cottonwood (Populus angustifolia), common at elevations above 1800 m, and Fremont cottonwood [a common name regionally attached to the ecologically very similar Populus fremontii subsp. fremontii S. Watson and P. deltoides subsp. wislizenii (S. Watson) Eckenwalder, as well as their intergrades], which is typically found at elevations below 1800 m.

Date posted: August 27, 2019

The Southern Rockies LCC is home to narrowleaf cottonwood (Populus angustifolia), common at elevations above 1800 m, and Fremont cottonwood [a common name regionally attached to the ecologically very similar Populus fremontii subsp. fremontii S. Watson and P. deltoides subsp. wislizenii (S. Watson) Eckenwalder, as well as their intergrades], which is typically found at elevations below 1800 m.

Date posted: August 27, 2019

The Southern Rockies LCC is home to narrowleaf cottonwood (Populus angustifolia), common at elevations above 1800 m, and Fremont cottonwood [a common name regionally attached to the ecologically very similar Populus fremontii subsp. fremontii S. Watson and P. deltoides subsp. wislizenii (S. Watson) Eckenwalder, as well as their intergrades], which is typically found at elevations below 1800 m.

Date posted: August 27, 2019

The Southern Rockies LCC is home to narrowleaf cottonwood (Populus angustifolia), common at elevations above 1800 m, and Fremont cottonwood [a common name regionally attached to the ecologically very similar Populus fremontii subsp. fremontii S. Watson and P. deltoides subsp. wislizenii (S. Watson) Eckenwalder, as well as their intergrades], which is typically found at elevations below 1800 m.

Date posted: August 27, 2019

PDF of Effects of saltcedar biocontrol and restoration on native herpetofauna along the Virgin River

Date posted: August 27, 2019

Amphibians and reptiles (herpetofauna) have been linked to specific microhabitat characteristics, microclimates, and water
resources in riparian forests. Our objective was to relate variation in herpetofauna abundance to changes in habitat caused by
a beetle used for Tamarix biocontrol (Diorhabda carinulata; Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and riparian restoration. During 2013
and 2014, we measured vegetation and monitored herpetofauna via trapping and visual encounter surveys (VES) at locations

Date posted: August 27, 2019

The Southern Rockies LCC is home to narrowleaf cottonwood (Populus angustifolia), common at elevations above 1800 m, and Fremont cottonwood [a common name regionally attached to the ecologically very similar Populus fremontii subsp. fremontii S. Watson and P. deltoides subsp. wislizenii (S. Watson) Eckenwalder, as well as their intergrades], which is typically found at elevations below 1800 m.

Date posted: August 27, 2019

The Southern Rockies LCC is home to narrowleaf cottonwood (Populus angustifolia), common at elevations above 1800 m, and Fremont cottonwood [a common name regionally attached to the ecologically very similar Populus fremontii subsp. fremontii S. Watson and P. deltoides subsp. wislizenii (S. Watson) Eckenwalder, as well as their intergrades], which is typically found at elevations below 1800 m.

Date posted: August 27, 2019

The Southern Rockies LCC is home to narrowleaf cottonwood (Populus angustifolia), common at elevations above 1800 m, and Fremont cottonwood [a common name regionally attached to the ecologically very similar Populus fremontii subsp. fremontii S. Watson and P. deltoides subsp. wislizenii (S. Watson) Eckenwalder, as well as their intergrades], which is typically found at elevations below 1800 m.

Date posted: August 27, 2019

Fisheries data compilation efforts for this project fell within two large watersheds in Arizona; the Verde River watershed (Desert LCC) and the Little Colorado River watershed (Southern Rockies LCC). We divided the project into two phases; 1) data compilation for the Arizona Game and Fish Fisheries Information Systems (FINS) and 2) a demonstration of FINS through model development and species distribution data.

Date posted: August 27, 2019

Hawaiian forest birds are imperiled, with fewer than half the original >40 species remaining extant. Recent studies document ongoing rapid population decline and project complete climate‐based range losses for the critically endangered Kaua'i endemics ‘akeke’e (Loxops caeruleirostris) and ‘akikiki (Oreomystis bairdi) by end‐of‐century due to projected warming. Climate change facilitates the upward expansion of avian malaria into native high elevation forests where disease was historically absent.

Date posted: August 14, 2019
Preview image of Madrean Adaptation Actions webinar June 2019 final.pdf
The Transboundary Madrean Watersheds initiative is a large landscape, international effort to maintain and enhance the interconnected system of mountains, grasslands, deserts and waters that supports species diversity, promotes healthy watersheds, and maintains the overall ecosystem integrity that enriches the lives of human communities. 
 
Date posted: August 12, 2019
Preview image of Madrean Watersheds spatial analysis webinar  5-28-19_final.pdf

The Transboundary Madrean Watersheds initiative is a large landscape, international effort to maintain and enhance the interconnected system of mountains, grasslands, deserts and waters that supports species diversity, promotes healthy watersheds, and maintains the overall ecosystem integrity that enriches the lives of human communities. This webinar presents conservation design spatial analysis products for the Transboundary Madrean Watersheds.

Date posted: August 6, 2019

This dataset represents results from this study attributed to the NHDPlus V2 catchments. Changes in climate occurring throughout the Mississippi River Basin are expected to lead to additional impacts in stream habitats and fish assemblages in multiple ways, including changing changing thermal properties and flow regimes. To manage streams for current impacts and future changes, managers need region-wide information for decision-making and developing proactive management strategies.

Date posted: July 18, 2019

This dataset represents results from this study attributed to the NHDPlus V2 catchments. Changes in climate occurring throughout the Mississippi River Basin are expected to lead to additional impacts in stream habitats and fish assemblages in multiple ways, including changing changing thermal properties and flow regimes. To manage streams for current impacts and future changes, managers need region-wide information for decision-making and developing proactive management strategies.

Date posted: July 18, 2019

Context and Research Question

Date posted: July 18, 2019

This dataset represents results from this study attributed to the NHDPlus V2 catchments. Changes in climate occurring throughout the Mississippi River Basin are expected to lead to additional impacts in stream habitats and fish assemblages in multiple ways, including changing changing thermal properties and flow regimes. To manage streams for current impacts and future changes, managers need region-wide information for decision-making and developing proactive management strategies.

Date posted: July 18, 2019

This dataset represents results from this study attributed to the NHDPlus V2 catchments. Changes in climate occurring throughout the Mississippi River Basin are expected to lead to additional impacts in stream habitats and fish assemblages in multiple ways, including changing changing thermal properties and flow regimes. To manage streams for current impacts and future changes, managers need region-wide information for decision-making and developing proactive management strategies.

Date posted: July 18, 2019

This dataset represents results from this study attributed to the NHDPlus V2 catchments. Changes in climate occurring throughout the Mississippi River Basin are expected to lead to additional impacts in stream habitats and fish assemblages in multiple ways, including changing changing thermal properties and flow regimes. To manage streams for current impacts and future changes, managers need region-wide information for decision-making and developing proactive management strategies.

Date posted: July 18, 2019

This dataset represents results from this study attributed to the NHDPlus V2 catchments. Changes in climate occurring throughout the Mississippi River Basin are expected to lead to additional impacts in stream habitats and fish assemblages in multiple ways, including changing changing thermal properties and flow regimes. To manage streams for current impacts and future changes, managers need region-wide information for decision-making and developing proactive management strategies.

Date posted: July 18, 2019

This dataset represents results from this study attributed to the NHDPlus V2 catchments. Changes in climate occurring throughout the Mississippi River Basin are expected to lead to additional impacts in stream habitats and fish assemblages in multiple ways, including changing changing thermal properties and flow regimes. To manage streams for current impacts and future changes, managers need region-wide information for decision-making and developing proactive management strategies.

Date posted: July 18, 2019

This data represent a compilation of seagrass information for areas along the Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, and Texas coasts from various source agencies. Seagrass areas were mapped from aerial photography taken between 1987 to 1999. The original source data were not all classified in the same manner, but the information from each of these sources was maintained in the final results.

Date posted: July 4, 2019

Climate velocity 1995-2055 map.

Date posted: June 25, 2019

Change agents, energy development and human modification map.

Date posted: June 25, 2019

The Human Modification (HM) model is designed to provide a comprehensive, but parsimonious approach, that uses several stressor/threats datasets to estimate level of human modification. There are three important elements that define the HM approach: (a) the human modification stressors and their data sources (b) the measurement unit used for each stressor, and (c) the method used to combine the effects of multiple stressors into an overall score of human modification. The way in which these various data layers are combined into a single index is quite important.

Date posted: June 25, 2019

The landscape permeability model represents the structural connectivity of sagebrush ecosystem habitat in the Green River Basin (including ~5-10 km boundary outside of the GRB. This model connects patches of habitat, across the landscape using resistances that represent the degree of human modification and slope (energetic costs), using the Multi-Scale Landscape Permeability model (Theobald et al. 2012; Theobald unpublished). We used two metrics: (a) patch importance and (b) betweeness centrality amongst patches. These metrics were summarized for each HUC12.

Date posted: June 25, 2019

Oil and gas map

Date posted: June 25, 2019

This map presents the study area of the Green River Basin LCD study area and the major land managers in the region.

Date posted: June 25, 2019

This dataset depicts riparian vegetation in the valley bottoms at 10-meter resolution for the Green River Basin Landscape Conservation Design (GRB LCD) project area covering portions of Utah, Wyoming and Colorado. Values are continuous and represent the portion of each 10-meter pixel comprised by woody riparian vegetation.

Date posted: June 25, 2019

For the Green River Basin Landscape Conservation Design (GRB LCD) assessment, we mapped the vulnerability of sagebrush ecosystem to climate change and resistance/resilience for each 12-digit hydrologic unit. Using a vulnerability framework, we defined Sensitivity (S) as the multi-scale average of sagebrush ecosystem land cover derived from LANDFIRE Existing Vegetation Type (LANDFIRE 2014). Exposure (E) to climate change was based on the max-normalized value of climate velocity from AdaptWest (2015).

Date posted: June 25, 2019

For the Green River Basin Landscape Conservation Design (GRB LCD) assessment, we mapped the vulnerability of the sagebrush ecosystem to oil and gas development for each 12-digit hydrologic unit. Using a vulnerability framework, we defined Sensitivity (S) as the multi-scale average of sagebrush ecosystem land cover derived from LANDFIRE Existing Vegetation Type (LANDFIRE 2014). Exposure (E) to oil and gas development was quantified as the average kernel density of active oil and gas wells at multiple scales.

Date posted: June 25, 2019

This website is a collaborative hub for Green River Basin Landscape Conservation Design (GRB LCD) participants to access project information, documents and data. It's a space for all to contribute ideas, news, project information or files through collaborative discussion, document editing and data sharing tools.

Date posted: June 25, 2019

This dataset represents the study area boundary of the Green River Basin Landscape Conservation Design project. This feature was generated from the USDA NRCS HU4 dataset and is comprised of the following features: 1404: Great Divide - Upper Green; 1405: White - Yampa; 1406: Lower Green.

Date posted: June 25, 2019

The Green River Basin Vulnerability Model Tools and Python Code folder contains ArcGIS 10.2.1 model builder tools and python scripts used in the development of output datasets for the Green River Basin Landscape Conservation Design. Provide is a ArcGIS model builder toolset for each vulnerability assessment. ArcGIS models have also been exported as python code for archiving purposes. Custom python scripts for computing the patch importance and permeability flow line inputs into the sagebrush ecosystem permeability model are also provided.

Date posted: June 25, 2019

For the Green River Basin Landscape Conservation Design (GRB LCD) assessment, we mapped the vulnerability of occupied Colorado River cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii pleuriticus) habitat to climate change for each 12-digit hydrologic unit. Cutthroat trout occupied habitat was mapped from the range-wide status report (Hirsch et. al 2013). Using a vulnerability framework, we defined Sensitivity (S) as the total length of occupied cutthroat trout habitat within HUC12 polygons.

Date posted: June 25, 2019

For the Green River Basin Landscape Conservation Design (GRB LCD) assessment, we mapped the vulnerability of the critical habitat for threatened and endangered fish species to oil and gas development for each 12-digit hydrologic unit. The following threatened and endangered fish species were included in this vulnerability assessment: Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius), Bonytail Chub (Gila elegans), Humpback chub (Gila cypha), and razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus).

Date posted: June 25, 2019

For the Green River Basin Landscape Conservation Design (GRB LCD) assessment, we mapped the vulnerability of riparian habitat for terrestrial species and process. Using a vulnerability framework, we defined Sensitivity (S) as the percent riparian vegetation within the valley bottom and Exposure (E) as the amount of human modification within the valley bottom. For each 12-digit hydrologic unit code within the GRB LCD we summarized the riparian sensitivity and exposure to human modification. We also computed Potential Impact (PI), and Adaptive Capacity (AC) metrics at the HUC12 level.

Date posted: June 25, 2019

Projected climate change 1980-2050 map.

Date posted: June 25, 2019

Ecological reference map.

Date posted: June 25, 2019

Management agencies map.

Date posted: June 25, 2019

Reference ecological systems map.

Date posted: June 25, 2019