Resources

LCCs have produced a wealth of informational documents, reports, fact sheets, webinars and more to help support resource managers in designing and delivering conservation at landscape scales.

1. Climate change vulnerability assessments are commonly used to identify species or populations at risk from global climate change, but few translate impact assessments to climate change adaptation actions. Furthermore, most climate change adaptation efforts emphasize where to implement management actions, whereas timing remains largely overlooked. The rate of modern climate change introduces urgency in evaluating whether delaying conservation actions compromises their efficacy for reaching important conservation targets.

Date posted: August 10, 2018

Pollinator decline and conservation is a complex and challenging issue with the potential to tax the capacity of individual state agencies; a collaborative approach among states and federal agencies has a higher likelihood success in meeting this emerging conservation challenge. Bumble bees have been identified as a particularly imperiled group of important pollinators. To aid the collaborative pollinator conservation effort, this report compiles the most up-to-date information related to bumble bees: threats, best practices for land management, and monitoring protocols into one location.

Date posted: August 10, 2018

Datasets intended to support development of the Multi-LCC Mississippi River Basin/Gulf Hypoxia Initiative's Conservation Blueprint 1.0.

Date posted: August 10, 2018

The ETPBR LCC Steering Committee (SC) consisted of 20-30 representatives from state, federal, tribal, and NGO entities. In December 2012, the LCC Steering Committee began drafting a strategic plan to provide a foundation and structure to carry out the mission and vision of the LCC and its partners. The SC met twice a year from 2012 to 2016 in various locations around the Midwest. Staff worked with the committee and project investigators to compile information for a set of descriptive flyers, posters, presentations, and annual updates.

Date posted: August 10, 2018

Various presentations given on SECAS in 2012.

Date posted: July 28, 2018

Abstract



Context Conservation planning is increasingly using ‘‘coarse filters’’ based on the idea of conserving ‘‘nature’s stage’’. One such approach is based on ecosystems and the concept of ecological integrity, although myriad ways exist to measure ecological integrity.


Date posted: July 17, 2018

These datasets are part of a suite of products from the Nature’s Network project. Nature’s Network is a collaborative effort to identify shared priorities for conservation in the Northeast, considering the value of fish and wildlife species and the natural areas they inhabit.

Date posted: July 17, 2018

Rivers and streams are highly vulnerable to fragmentation from roads due to their prevalence in the landscape. Road-stream crossings are far more numerous than other anthropogenic barriers such as dams; these crossing structures (culverts, bridges, fords, and tide gates) have been demonstrated to impede the passage of aquatic organisms. However, road-stream crossings vary widely in the extent to which they serve as a barrier. It is important to identify barrier severity to facilitate prioritization of restoration activities, since proactively addressing all structures is not feasible.

Date posted: July 14, 2018

These datasets depict three zones of uncertainty in the predicted future distribution of 28 representative species based on climate suitability, given the projected climate in 2080 (averaged across RPC 4.5 and 8.5 climate scenarios). The “Zone of Persistence” represents those areas where the species is expected to continue to occur through 2080. The “Zone of Contraction” represents those areas that are currently suitable from a climate perspective but where the 2080 climate is projected to be no longer suitable.

Date posted: July 14, 2018

This project integrated a map-based interface into the Alaska Department of Fish and Game's Community Subsistence Information System to provide for simple navigation, and representation of the availability of information by type, time series, and location.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

Existing stream temperature data will be compiled from numerous federal, state, tribal, and private sources to develop an integrated regional database. Spatial statistical models for river networks will be applied to these data to develop an accurate model that predicts stream temperature for all fish-bearing streams in the US portion of the NPLCC. Differences between model outputs for historic and future climate scenarios will be used to assess spatial variation in the vulnerability of sensitive fish species across the NPLCC.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

The intent of this project was to create a directory of academic climate change scientists that focus on the North Pacific Coast of North America—including California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, British Columbia, and Alaska. The University of Washington developed the California, Oregon, Washington, and Idaho portion of the directory and Alaska Coastal Rainforest Center developed the British Columbia and Alaska portion of the directory. Funding was provided by the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NPLCC) and the Northwest Climate Science Center (NWCSC).

Date posted: June 27, 2018

The Alaska Coastal Rainforest Center (ACRC) held a symposium titled "Coastal Temperate Rainforests: Integrating Science, Resource Management, and Communities" on April 17‐19, 2012, in Juneau, Alaska. The three day event included an all‐day field trip to Berner's Bay (north of Juneau), an international plenary, three concurrent sessions, two lunch‐time keynote speakers, an evening open public reception, an evening science social, and an evening banquet.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

Existing stream temperature data will be compiled from numerous federal, state, tribal, and private sources to develop an integrated regional database. Spatial statistical models for river networks will be applied to these data to develop an accurate model that predicts stream temperature for all fish-bearing streams in the US portion of the NPLCC. Differences between model outputs for historic and future climate scenarios will be used to assess spatial variation in the vulnerability of sensitive fish species across the NPLCC.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

The workshop “How to Adapt to Climate Change” was held on May 10, 2015 at the University of Victoria by B.C. Parks and Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium (PCIC). The goal of this workshop was to introduce protected area managers to the concept of rapid assessment and conceptual modelling for adaptation to climate change. It was led by Tory Stevens (B.C. Parks) and Trevor Murdoch (PCIC).

Date posted: June 27, 2018

Existing stream temperature data will be compiled from numerous federal, state, tribal, and private sources to develop an integrated regional database. Spatial statistical models for river networks will be applied to these data to develop an accurate model that predicts stream temperature for all fish-bearing streams in the US portion of the NPLCC. Differences between model outputs for historic and future climate scenarios will be used to assess spatial variation in the vulnerability of sensitive fish species across the NPLCC.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

Wetlands in the remote mountains of the western US have undergone two massive ecological “experiments” spanning the 20th century. Beginning in the late 1800s and expanding after World War II, fish and wildlife managers intentionally introduced millions of predatory trout (primarily Oncorhynchus spp) into fishless mountain ponds and lakes across the western states. These new top predators, which now occupy 95% of large mountain lakes, have limited the habitat distributions of native frogs, salamanders, and wetland invertebrates to smaller, more ephemeral ponds where trout do not survive.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

The primary objective of the research is to develop a rule-based decision support system to predict the relative vulnerability of nearshore species to climate change. The approach is designed to be applicable to fishes and invertebrates with limited data by predicting risk from readily avialable data, including species' biogeographic distributions and natural history attributes.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

This report provides a first-ever compilation of what is known—and not known—about climate change effects on marine and coastal ecosystems in the geographic extent of the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NPLCC). The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service funded this report to help inform members of the newly established NPLCC as they assess priorities and begin operations. Production of this report was guided by University of Washington’s Climate Impacts Group and information was drawn from more than 250 documents and more than 100 interviews.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

Wetlands are globally important ecosystems that provide critical services for natural communities and human society, such as water storage and filtration, wildlife habitat, agriculture, recreation, nutrient cycling, and carbon sequestration. They are also considered to be among the most sensitive ecosystems to climate change, which will exacerbate the already threatened nature of wetlands due to changes in land-use.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

This report provides a compilation of what is known – and not known – about climate change effects on terrestrial ecosystems in the geographic extent of the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NPLCC). Where a broader regional context is needed, we also present information from surrounding areas. The NPLCC funded this report to help inform members of the NPLCC as they assess priorities and continue operations.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

This report provides a first-ever compilation of what is known—and not known—about climate change effects on freshwater aquatic and riparian ecosystems in the geographic extent of the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NPLCC). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service funded this report to help inform members of the newly established NPLCC as they assess priorities and begin operations. Production of this report was guided by University of Washington’s Climate Impacts Group and information was drawn from more than 250 documents and more than 100 interviews.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

The primary objective of the research is to develop a rule-based decision support system to predict the relative vulnerability of nearshore species to climate change. The approach is designed to be applicable to fishes and invertebrates with limited data by predicting risk from readily avialable data, including species' biogeographic distributions and natural history attributes.

Date posted: June 27, 2018

This final progress report describes the completion of the objectives of U.S. FWS Agreement Number F11AP00032 (Agreement) – Moving from Impacts to Action: Expert Focus Groups for Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Strategies in Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems of the North Pacific LCC – and Modification No. 001 to said Agreement – Identifying and Synthesizing Climate Change Effects, Adaptation Approaches, and Science Opportunities in the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative’s (NPLCC) Terrestrial Ecosystems. 

Date posted: June 27, 2018

This dataset depicts the terrestrial boundaries of the Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCC) within Alaska. Those LCCs are: Aleutian and Bering Sea Islands, Arctic, North Pacific, Northwest Boreal, and Western Alaska. These boundaries are derived from the master LCC Boundary dataset maintained by USFWS, but portions of these polygons have been modified. The specific modification are listed below:
ARCTIC LCC: Portions of the polygon were edited to more closely match the coastline and the boundary was also edited to include the Colville River.

Date posted: June 24, 2018

Polar bears along Alaska's Beaufort Sea frequently give birth to young in land-based snow dens.
These dens are established in November, typically in deep snowdrifts that have developed in the
lee of cut-banks found along streams, rivers, and the coast. Durner et al. (2001, 2006) indicated
that, for 24 known land den sites, the local slopes ranged from 15 to 50° and were 1.3 to 34 m
high. The dens faced all directions but east. They published a distribution map based on habitat

Date posted: June 24, 2018

The Arctic Shorebird Demographic Network (Network) is an
international collaboration dedicated to gaining a better
understanding of why arctic-nesting shorebirds are in decline
and determine which life history stage (i.e., breeding success vs.
adult survival) is limiting shorebird population growth or
driving declines.

Date posted: June 24, 2018

Average historical annual total precipitation, projected total precipitation (inches), and relative change in total precipitation (% change from baseline) for Northern Alaska. GIF formatted animation and PNG images. Maps created using the SNAP 5-GCM composite (AR5-RCP 6.0) and CRU TS3.1.01 datasets.

Date posted: June 24, 2018

To better understand and predict effects of climate change on wetlands, invertebrates and shorebirds, the 'CEWISH' group,
composed of Cryohydrology, Invertebrate, Shorebird Food Use, and Shorebird/Population Modeling teams, collected field
data at Barrow, Alaska, between May and September 2014–2015. The Cryohydrology team measured end-of-winter
snow accumulation, snowmelt at the landscape scale, pond water levels, and pond water and sediment temperatures. The

Date posted: June 24, 2018

The Pacific Loon is the most common breeding loon in Arctic Alaska, nesting throughout much
of the state (Russell 2002). This species typically breeds on lakes that are ≥1 ha in size in both
boreal and tundra habitats. They are primarily piscivorous although they are known to commonly
feed chicks invertebrates (D. Rizzolo and J. Schmutz, unpublished data). Many Pacific Loons
spend their winters in offshore waters of the west coast of Canada and the U.S. (Russell 2002).

Date posted: June 24, 2018

Baseline (1961-1990) average annual temperature in and projected change in temperature for for the northern portion of Alaska. The Alaska portion of the Arctic LCC's terrestrial boundary is depicted by the black line. Baseline results for 1961-1990 are derived from Climate Research Unit (CRU) TS3.1 data and downscaled to 2km grids; results for the other time periods (2010-2039, 2040-2069, 2070-2099) are based on the SNAP 5-GCM composite using the AR5-RCP 6.0, downscaled to 2km grids.

Date posted: June 24, 2018

This map was created by Arctic LCC staff and depicts the general boundaries of the Arctic LCC overlayed onto a satellite image. This map is in JPG format, suitable for presentations.

Date posted: June 24, 2018

This map was created by Arctic LCC staff and depicts the general boundaries of the Arctic LCC overlayed onto a satellite image. This map is in PDF format, suitable for printing.

Date posted: June 24, 2018

Baseline (1961-1990) average total precipitation (inches) for Alaska and Western Canada. This zip file contains three GeoTIFF rasters. The file names identifies whether a file represents an annual mean or a seasonal mean (i.e., summer or winter). Summer is defined as June - August; winter is defined as December - February. Baseline data are derived from Climate Research Unit
(CRU) TS 3.1.01 data. CRU data courtesy of Scenarios Network for Alaska and
Arctic Planning.

Date posted: June 24, 2018

An ecological land classification is essential to evaluating land resources and refining
management strategies for various areas. More specifically, a landscape-level stratification can
be used to more efficiently allocate inventory and monitoring efforts, to improve land cover
classifications developed from remote sensing, to partition ecological information for analysis of
ecological relationships and develop of predictive models, and to improve recommendations for
ecological restoration.

Date posted: June 24, 2018

Permafrost is a unique characteristic of polar regions and high mountains and is fundamental
to geomorphic processes and ecological development in permafrost-affected environments.
Because permafrost impedes drainage and ice-rich permafrost settles upon thawing, degradation
of permafrost in response to climate change will have large consequences for tundra and boreal
ecosystems (Osterkamp 2005, Jorgenson and Osterkamp 2005, Shur and Osterkamp 2007,
Jorgenson et al. 2010, 2013). Thawing permafrost affects surface hydrology by impounding

Date posted: June 24, 2018

Average historical annual total precipitation, projected total precipitation (mm), and relative change in total precipitation (% change from baseline) for Northern Alaska. GIF formatted animation and PNG images. Maps created using the SNAP 5-GCM composite (AR5-RCP 6.0) and CRU TS3.1.01 datasets.

Date posted: June 24, 2018

Results indicate that the regions most vulnerable
to ecological shifts under the influence of climate
change are likely to be the interior and northern
mountainous portions of Alaska; the northern
Yukon; and much of the Northwest Territories.
Although the A1B and A2 emissions scenarios predict
more cliome shift overall, as compared to the
more conservative B1 scenario, the patterns hold
true across all three. Notably, there are no areas of
the NWT predicted to retain their current cliomes.

Date posted: June 24, 2018

The Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) of Alaska is an important region for millions of migrating and nesting shorebirds. However, this region is threatened by climate change and increased human development (e.g., oil and gas production) that have the potential to greatly impact shorebird populations and breeding habitat in the near future. Because historic data on shorebird distributions in the ACP are very coarse and incomplete, we sought to develop detailed, contemporary distribution maps so that the potential impacts of climate-mediated changes and development could be ascertained.

Date posted: June 24, 2018

ire-induced permafrost degradation is well documented in boreal forests, but the role of fires in initiating thermokarst development in Arctic tundra is less well understood. Here we show that Arctic tundra fires may induce widespread thaw subsidence of permafrost terrain in the first seven years following the disturbance. Quantitative analysis of airborne LiDAR data acquired two and seven years post-fire, detected permafrost thaw subsidence across 34% of the burned tundra area studied, compared to less than 1% in similar undisturbed, ice-rich tundra terrain units.

Date posted: June 24, 2018

Researchers from the Manomet Center for Conservation
Sciences combined field observations of shorebirds with
mapped physical and ecological parameters to develop a series of
spatially dependent habitat selection models that predict the
contemporary distribution of shorebird species across the Arctic
Coastal Plain of Alaska.

Date posted: June 24, 2018

Stream physical parameter time series files for six or more beaded streams on the North Slope of Alaska in the Fish Creek Watershed near Nuiqsut. These include time series of water temperature (pool bed and surface and channel runs) and pool stage and correspond stream discharge developed from a rating curve.

Date posted: June 24, 2018

Water availability, distribution, quality and quantity are critical habitat elements for fish and other water-dependent species. Furthermore, the availability of water is also a pre-requisite for a number of human activities. The density of weather and hydrology observation sites on the North Slope is orders of magnitude less than in other parts of the U.S., making it difficult to document hydrologic trends and develop accurate predictive models where water is a key input. The information that does exist is scattered among many entities, and varies in format.

Date posted: June 24, 2018

Throughout the Arctic most pregnant polar bears (Ursus maritimus) construct maternity dens in seasonal snowdrifts that form in wind-shadowed areas. We developed and verified a spatial snowdrift polar bearden habitat model (SnowDens-3D) that predicts snowdrift locations and depths along Alaska’s Beaufort Sea coast. SnowDens-3D integrated snow physics, weather data, and a high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) to produce predictions of the timing, distribution, and growth of snowdrifts suitable for polar bear dens.

Date posted: June 24, 2018

The purpose of this Traditional Knowledge (TK) research is to document important habitat characteristics of the selected focal fish and wildlife species based on the observations of traditional land users. The information may be used to develop habitat models to show where these specific fish and wildlife habitats occur across the Yukon North Slope. The Traditional Knowledge may also be used to validate other types of habitat mapping or to identify specialized habitats such as movement corridors, denning areas, wintering areas.

Date posted: June 24, 2018

Appendices excerpted from the "Predicting Future Potential Climate-Biomes for the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Alaska" report.

Date posted: June 24, 2018