Resources

LCCs have produced a wealth of informational documents, reports, fact sheets, webinars and more to help support resource managers in designing and delivering conservation at landscape scales.

The Great Plains Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GPLCC) has participated in watershedbased conservation planning efforts which identify flow protection and restoration strategies as priority conservation actions to conserve native fishes in the Great Plains. Through this initiative, the Great Plains Environmental Flow Information Toolkit (GP EFIT) was developed to inform identification of voluntary environmental flow protection and restoration strategies.

Date posted: February 14, 2020

The Great Plains Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GPLCC) has participated in watershedbased conservation planning efforts which identify flow protection and restoration strategies as priority conservation actions to conserve native fishes in the Great Plains. Through this initiative, the Great Plains Environmental Flow Information Toolkit (GP EFIT) was developed to inform identification of voluntary environmental flow protection and restoration strategies.

Date posted: February 14, 2020

Feature class data was designed to support the development of the Environmental Flows Information Toolkit (EFIT) a geospatial application initiated by Texas Parks and Wildlife (TPWD). The EFIT is a web-based tool built around conservation problem solving using innovative data and integrated statistical models. The objective of this application is to identify and prioritize opportunity areas for streamflow conservation within the Great Plains of Texas.

Date posted: February 14, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 ecosystem service that could benefit most from collaborative conservation, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that service across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red.

Date posted: February 7, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 montane habitat fragmentation and loss stressor, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas where they work were given a tally for each of the top 3 stressors that participants chose.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 invasive and problematic plant stressor for grasslands in the Chihuahuan Desert, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 invasive and problematic plant stressor for riparian areas in the Chihuahuan Desert, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 invasive animal stressor for grasslands in the Chihuahuan Desert, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 invasive animal stressor for montane areas in the Chihuahuan Desert, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 invasive animal stressor for riparian areas in the Chihuahuan Desert, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 grassland ecosystem functionality stressor, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas where they work were given a tally for each of the top 3 stressors that participants chose.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 montane ecosystem functionality stressor, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas where they work were given a tally for each of the top 3 stressors that participants chose.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 riparian ecosystem functionality stressor, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas where they work were given a tally for each of the top 3 stressors that participants chose.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 grassland habitat fragmentation and loss stressor, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas where they work were given a tally for each of the top 3 stressors that participants chose.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 riparian habitat fragmentation and loss stressor, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas where they work were given a tally for each of the top 3 stressors that participants chose.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 invasive and problematic plant stressor for montane areas in the Chihuahuan Desert, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red.

Date posted: January 30, 2020
Preview image of CCAST_CRAB Meeting_Jan 2020.pdf

The CCAST team had an active fall and early winter with several presentations at local meetings. Click the attachments posted here for two presentations as well as a downloadable poster. Meetings included:

  • Colorado River Aquatic Biologists (CRAB) meeting in Laughlin, Nevada (January 8-9, 2020)
  • Gila River Basin Native Fish Program annual meeting in Cottonwood, Arizona (December 9-11, 2019)
  • Society for Ecological Restoration Southwest Chapter Annual Conference in Tucson, Arizona (November 8-10, 2019)
     
Date posted: January 23, 2020

This item contains groundwater features such as aquifers and brackish groundwater wells within the Dos Rios LCD project area.

Date posted: January 15, 2020

The 2010 North American Land Cover 30-meter dataset was produced as part of the North American Land Change Monitoring System (NALCMS), a trilateral effort between Natural Resources Canada, the United States Geological Survey, and three Mexican organizations including the National Institute of Statistics and Geography (Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía), National Commission for the Knowledge and Use of the Biodiversity (Comisión Nacional Para el Conocimiento y Uso de la Biodiversidad), and the National Forestry Commission of Mexico (Comisión Nacional Forestal).

Date posted: January 15, 2020

These heatmaps were created from responses to an ecosystem stressors ranking exercise from 157 conservation professionals working in the Chihuahuan Desert. The ranking exercise was created by the Borderlands Research Institute at Sul Ross State University, in Alpine, Texas. The exercise was sent to conservation partners within the Chihuahuan Desert region in the winter of 2018 and 2019. Participants were asked to identify counties in the US and municipalities in Mexico where they focus their conservation work.

Date posted: January 15, 2020

This item contains surface water features such as subbasins, major rivers, and streamflow gauges within the Dos Rios LCD project area.

Date posted: January 15, 2020

This dataset features suitable habitat connected to the main channel (based on floodplain inundation) within managed areas at discharges from 15,000 cfs to 100,000 cfs. The spatial extent for floodplain inundation modeling in the lower Trinity River was from Romayor, Texas, to approximately Moss Bluff, Texas. River sections were modeled using steady flow conditions. For the upper section, discharge and stage were both available for the two gages (Romayor USGS 08066500 and Liberty USGS 08067000).

Date posted: December 27, 2019

This dataset features floodplain depth (in meters) at discharges from 15,000 cfs to 100,000 cfs. The spatial extent for floodplain inundation modeling in the lower Trinity River was from Romayor, Texas, to approximately Moss Bluff, Texas. River sections were modeled using steady flow conditions. For the upper section, discharge and stage were both available for the two gages (Romayor USGS 08066500 and Liberty USGS 08067000). For the lower section, the Moss Bluff gage (USGS 08067100) is tidally-influenced, so gage height didn’t correspond to upstream changes in discharge.

Date posted: December 27, 2019

This dataset features suitable habitat at discharges from 15,000 cfs to 100,000 cfs. The spatial extent for floodplain inundation modeling in the lower Trinity River was from Romayor, Texas, to approximately Moss Bluff, Texas. River sections were modeled using steady flow conditions. For the upper section, discharge and stage were both available for the two gages (Romayor USGS 08066500 and Liberty USGS 08067000). For the lower section, the Moss Bluff gage (USGS 08067100) is tidally-influenced, so gage height didn’t correspond to upstream changes in discharge.

Date posted: December 27, 2019

This dataset features floodplain depth (in meters) at discharges from 15,000 cfs to 100,000 cfs. The spatial extent for floodplain inundation modeling in the lower Trinity River was from Romayor, Texas, to approximately Moss Bluff, Texas. River sections were modeled using steady flow conditions. For the upper section, discharge and stage were both available for the two gages (Romayor USGS 08066500 and Liberty USGS 08067000). For the lower section, the Moss Bluff gage (USGS 08067100) is tidally-influenced, so gage height didn’t correspond to upstream changes in discharge.

Date posted: December 27, 2019

This dataset features suitable habitat connected to the main channel (based on floodplain inundation) at discharges from 15,000 cfs to 100,000 cfs. The spatial extent for floodplain inundation modeling in the lower Trinity River was from Romayor, Texas, to approximately Moss Bluff, Texas. River sections were modeled using steady flow conditions. For the upper section, discharge and stage were both available for the two gages (Romayor USGS 08066500 and Liberty USGS 08067000).

Date posted: December 27, 2019

This dataset features suitable habitat connected to the main channel (based on floodplain inundation) within managed areas at discharges from 15,000 cfs to 100,000 cfs. The spatial extent for floodplain inundation modeling in the lower Trinity River was from Romayor, Texas, to approximately Moss Bluff, Texas. River sections were modeled using steady flow conditions. For the upper section, discharge and stage were both available for the two gages (Romayor USGS 08066500 and Liberty USGS 08067000).

Date posted: December 27, 2019

This dataset features suitable depth (0.2 m ≤ depth ≤ 2.0 m) at discharges from 15,000 cfs to 100,000 cfs. The spatial extent for floodplain inundation modeling in the lower Trinity River was from Romayor, Texas, to approximately Moss Bluff, Texas. River sections were modeled using steady flow conditions. For the upper section, discharge and stage were both available for the two gages (Romayor USGS 08066500 and Liberty USGS 08067000). For the lower section, the Moss Bluff gage (USGS 08067100) is tidally-influenced, so gage height didn’t correspond to upstream changes in discharge.

Date posted: December 27, 2019

The spatial products described here rate the ecological integrity of six broadly defined habitats (Table 1-1; Appendix Table A-1). We selected these habitats as conservation targets for the Edwards to Gulf Landscape Conservation Design (LCD) through a participatory process (Tarbox et al. 2018). We then conducted a viability assessment of each habitat by identifying their key ecological attributes (KEAs), and appropriate indicators. We assessed the status of KEAs to determine the ecological integrity of each habitat type (FOS 2013).

Date posted: October 9, 2019

The spatial products described here prioritize different types of conservation actions for six broadly defined habitats (Table 1-1; Appendix Table A-1). We identified these habitat types as the conservation targets of the Edwards to Gulf Landscape Conservation Design (LCD) through a participatory process (Tarbox et al. 2018). We then conducted a viability assessment of each conservation target by identifying their key ecological attributes (KEAs), and appropriate indicators. We then assessed the status of KEAs to determine the ecological integrity of each habitat type (FOS 2013).

Date posted: October 9, 2019

The Edwards to Gulf Conservation Blueprint represents a participatory effort to develop a suite of decision support tools that facilitate cooperation between conservation partners in the region. The blueprint was created in a transparent and iterative process, building upon a previously existing coarse filter blueprint to generate a fine filter by increasing the spatial resolution, and number and variety of indicators used.

Date posted: October 9, 2019

Situated in the Mississippi Alluvial Plain of the Gulf Coast Prairie Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GCP LCC), the Chitimacha Tribe is one of four federally recognized tribes in Louisiana. The Tribal seat, trust lands/ reservation, and adjacent Tribal owned lands are located near Charenton, Louisiana, totaling nearly 1,000 acres. The Chitimacha, with a population of approximately 1,400 people, are currently impacted by storm surge, which is expected to increase with climate change.

Date posted: October 9, 2019

The northern bobwhite Colinus virginianus has experienced range-wide declines over the past several decades, primarily due to habitat loss and habitat fragmentation. As northern bobwhite populations continue to decline, there is a need for studies that address the impact of habitat changes on population persistence at multiple spatial scales. Our goal was to assess changes in habitat and land use related to northern bobwhite declines across multiple spatial scales in Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana. We determined northern bobwhite trends for 1972–2012 using Breeding Bird Survey data.

Date posted: October 9, 2019

Prymnesium parvum (golden alga, GA) is a toxigenic harmful alga native to marine ecosystems that has also affected brackish inland waters. The first toxic bloom of GA in the western hemisphere occurred in the Pecos River, one of the saltiest rivers in North America. Environmental factors (water quality) associated with GA occurrence in this basin, however, have not been examined. Water quality and GA presence and abundance were determined at eight sites in the Pecos River basin with or without prior history of toxic blooms. Sampling was conducted monthly from January 2012 to July 2013.

Date posted: September 24, 2019

Sagebrush steppe map

Date posted: August 27, 2019

Species occurrence data

Date posted: August 27, 2019

Summary notes from workshop 1.

Date posted: August 27, 2019

The Southern Rockies LCC is home to narrowleaf cottonwood (Populus angustifolia), common at elevations above 1800 m, and Fremont cottonwood [a common name regionally attached to the ecologically very similar Populus fremontii subsp. fremontii S. Watson and P. deltoides subsp. wislizenii (S. Watson) Eckenwalder, as well as their intergrades], which is typically found at elevations below 1800 m.

Date posted: August 27, 2019

The Southern Rockies LCC is home to narrowleaf cottonwood (Populus angustifolia), common at elevations above 1800 m, and Fremont cottonwood [a common name regionally attached to the ecologically very similar Populus fremontii subsp. fremontii S. Watson and P. deltoides subsp. wislizenii (S. Watson) Eckenwalder, as well as their intergrades], which is typically found at elevations below 1800 m.

Date posted: August 27, 2019

The Southern Rockies LCC is home to narrowleaf cottonwood (Populus angustifolia), common at elevations above 1800 m, and Fremont cottonwood [a common name regionally attached to the ecologically very similar Populus fremontii subsp. fremontii S. Watson and P. deltoides subsp. wislizenii (S. Watson) Eckenwalder, as well as their intergrades], which is typically found at elevations below 1800 m.

Date posted: August 27, 2019

The Southern Rockies LCC is home to narrowleaf cottonwood (Populus angustifolia), common at elevations above 1800 m, and Fremont cottonwood [a common name regionally attached to the ecologically very similar Populus fremontii subsp. fremontii S. Watson and P. deltoides subsp. wislizenii (S. Watson) Eckenwalder, as well as their intergrades], which is typically found at elevations below 1800 m.

Date posted: August 27, 2019

PDF of Effects of saltcedar biocontrol and restoration on native herpetofauna along the Virgin River

Date posted: August 27, 2019

Amphibians and reptiles (herpetofauna) have been linked to specific microhabitat characteristics, microclimates, and water
resources in riparian forests. Our objective was to relate variation in herpetofauna abundance to changes in habitat caused by
a beetle used for Tamarix biocontrol (Diorhabda carinulata; Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and riparian restoration. During 2013
and 2014, we measured vegetation and monitored herpetofauna via trapping and visual encounter surveys (VES) at locations

Date posted: August 27, 2019

The Southern Rockies LCC is home to narrowleaf cottonwood (Populus angustifolia), common at elevations above 1800 m, and Fremont cottonwood [a common name regionally attached to the ecologically very similar Populus fremontii subsp. fremontii S. Watson and P. deltoides subsp. wislizenii (S. Watson) Eckenwalder, as well as their intergrades], which is typically found at elevations below 1800 m.

Date posted: August 27, 2019

The Southern Rockies LCC is home to narrowleaf cottonwood (Populus angustifolia), common at elevations above 1800 m, and Fremont cottonwood [a common name regionally attached to the ecologically very similar Populus fremontii subsp. fremontii S. Watson and P. deltoides subsp. wislizenii (S. Watson) Eckenwalder, as well as their intergrades], which is typically found at elevations below 1800 m.

Date posted: August 27, 2019

The Southern Rockies LCC is home to narrowleaf cottonwood (Populus angustifolia), common at elevations above 1800 m, and Fremont cottonwood [a common name regionally attached to the ecologically very similar Populus fremontii subsp. fremontii S. Watson and P. deltoides subsp. wislizenii (S. Watson) Eckenwalder, as well as their intergrades], which is typically found at elevations below 1800 m.

Date posted: August 27, 2019

Fisheries data compilation efforts for this project fell within two large watersheds in Arizona; the Verde River watershed (Desert LCC) and the Little Colorado River watershed (Southern Rockies LCC). We divided the project into two phases; 1) data compilation for the Arizona Game and Fish Fisheries Information Systems (FINS) and 2) a demonstration of FINS through model development and species distribution data.

Date posted: August 27, 2019

Hawaiian forest birds are imperiled, with fewer than half the original >40 species remaining extant. Recent studies document ongoing rapid population decline and project complete climate‐based range losses for the critically endangered Kaua'i endemics ‘akeke’e (Loxops caeruleirostris) and ‘akikiki (Oreomystis bairdi) by end‐of‐century due to projected warming. Climate change facilitates the upward expansion of avian malaria into native high elevation forests where disease was historically absent.

Date posted: August 14, 2019
Preview image of Madrean Adaptation Actions webinar June 2019 final.pdf
The Transboundary Madrean Watersheds initiative is a large landscape, international effort to maintain and enhance the interconnected system of mountains, grasslands, deserts and waters that supports species diversity, promotes healthy watersheds, and maintains the overall ecosystem integrity that enriches the lives of human communities. 
 
Date posted: August 12, 2019
Preview image of Madrean Watersheds spatial analysis webinar  5-28-19_final.pdf

The Transboundary Madrean Watersheds initiative is a large landscape, international effort to maintain and enhance the interconnected system of mountains, grasslands, deserts and waters that supports species diversity, promotes healthy watersheds, and maintains the overall ecosystem integrity that enriches the lives of human communities. This webinar presents conservation design spatial analysis products for the Transboundary Madrean Watersheds.

Date posted: August 6, 2019