Projects By Product: Conservation Plan, Design, or Framework

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives use a collaborative approach to identify landscape scale conservation solutions. LCCs work across jurisdictional and political boundaries to work with partners to: meet unfilled conservation needs, develop decision support tools, share data and knowledge, and facilitate and foster partnerships.

As part of a shared science strategy, LCCs coordinate closely with the National Climate Change and Wildlife Center and the eight regional Climate Science Centers.

It has been recognized by the Appalachian LCC partnership that to develop and deliver landscape-level planning tools, it is essential to develop an Appalachian-wide map depicting where cave and karst habitats and resources occur across the landscape.

Future climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies will be dependent on the best available projections of how the regional climate will change and the impacts those changes will have on the region’s natural and cultural resources.

Across the Tennessee River Basin is a collaboration within the Appalachian LCC bringing together multiple agencies and stakeholders in a joint effort to plan and deliver landscape conservation actions to protect one of the most diverse areas for aquatic species in North America.

Assessing Future Energy Development across the Appalachian LCC used models that combined data on energy development trends and identified where these may intersect with important natural resource and ecosystem services to give a more comprehensive picture of what potential energy development coul

The Data Needs Assessment research project was undertaken to review the variety of resources on conservation planning to provide packages of products, data, and identified data gaps to improve conservation planning in the Appalachian LCC.

Given the rapid environmental change experienced and expected across the Appalachians, it will be crucial to understand the vulnerabilities of valued ecosystem services to drivers of large-scale change that may threaten their sustainability.

Purpose of the PA-CAT:To provide information and guidance in support of establishment and management of comprehensive protected areas systems in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Role/Tasks:

An urgent problem that we, the Caribbean conservation community, need to address is how best to allocate scarce resources to conservation initiatives directed at cays.

Project Vision and BackgroundThe Caribbean Landscape Conservation Cooperative (CLCC) is developing shared conservation priorities to guide their individual and collective conservation actions.

This project will build on a nascent Landscape Connectivity Network facilitated by Pepperwood and comprised of land trusts, parks and open space districts, with state and federal land managers.

This project will build on a nascent Landscape Connectivity Network facilitated by Pepperwood and comprised of land trusts, parks and open space districts, with state and federal land managers.

While meadows cover less than one percent of the Sierra Nevada, these ecosystems are of high ecological importance given their role in carbon and nitrogen storage, mediation of surface water flows, groundwater recharge, sediment filtration, and as refugia for numerous species.

This project brought together natural resource managers, conservation coordinators and planners, and scientists working at multiple scales within the San Francisco Bay to develop a spatially-explicit decision framework that cuts across jurisdictional boundaries while accounting for uncertainties

This project used the NatureServe Climate Change Vulnerability Index tool to assess vulnerability of 140 bird species that breed in the Sierra Nevada and will develop a peer-reviewed Climate Change Adaptation Strategy for Sierra Nevada bird species that are most vulnerable to climate change.

The Southeast Conservation Adaptation Strategy (SECAS) is a shared, long-term vision for lands and waters that sustain fish and wildlife populations and improve human quality of life across the southeastern United States and Caribbean.

FY2013Shrub-dominated ecosystems of the Great Basin are being threatened by disturbances, typically wildfire followed by encroachment of invasive plants (e.g., cheat grass).

The Cascadia Parner Forum fosters a network of natural resource practitioners working with the NPLCC and GNLCC to guild the adaptive capacity of the landscape and species living within it.

In response to the threats of land use and changing environmental conditions, the North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) and the Northeast Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (NEAFWA) coordinated a team of partners from 13 states, the U.S.

The Northeast Regional Conservation Framework Workshop, held in June 2011, provided an opportunity to step back and synthesize the results of many projects that have been completed or are underway through the Northeast Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Regional Conservation Needs (RCN) pr

In the face of rapid environmental change, a strategic approach is necessary to most efficiently target conservation actions for the hundreds of fish and wildlife species for which the agencies are responsible. One element in the strategic approach advanced by the U.S.

This request is in support of the Southeast Natural Resource Leaders Group (SENRLG) Landscape Conservation and Restoration Pilot Project.

This pilot project will assist the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (SALCC) identify issues dealing with the integration of natural and cultural resource sustainability and recommend optimal strategies for solving impacts associated with landscape stressors like climate change, i

This project seeks to develop a tool that strategically identifies priority areas for land protection. This is a pilot study to assess the extent of taxa that contain adequate genetic sampling within the south Atlantic ecoregion for characterization of intraspecific genetic variation.

The USGS Southeast Ecological Science Center (SESC) Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) database provides records of sightings and capture data of non-native (introduced) aquatic species over the entire the United States (Benson 1999).

The South Atlantic Conservation Blueprint is a living spatial plan to conserve natural and cultural resources for future generations. It identifies shared conservation priorities across the South Atlantic region. The first Blueprint, Version 1.0, was released in March 2014.

The South Atlantic Conservation Blueprint is a living spatial plan to conserve natural and cultural resources for future generations. It identifies shared conservation priorities across the South Atlantic region. The second iteration of the Blueprint, Version 2.0, was released in July 2015.

The South Atlantic Conservation Blueprint is a living spatial plan to conserve natural and cultural resources for future generations. It identifies shared conservation priorities across the South Atlantic region. The fourth iteration of the Blueprint, Version 2.2, was released in November 2017.

The South Atlantic Conservation Blueprint is a living spatial plan to conserve natural and cultural resources for future generations. It identifies shared conservation priorities across the South Atlantic region. The third iteration of the Blueprint, Version 2.1, was released in August 2016.

Managers and scientists are working together in a new project to understand and optimally manage conservation lands along the Atlanta and Mississippi Flyways to support continental populations of waterbirds.

FY2015The Great Basin Region, which covers much of Nevada, and portions of California, Oregon, Idaho, and Utah, managers are already confronting a changing climate and are beginning to make management decisions despite uncertainty in how climate change effects will manifest in the region.

FY2015The Great Basin Region, which covers much of Nevada, and portions of California, Oregon, Idaho, and Utah, managers are already confronting a changing climate and are beginning to make management decisions despite uncertainty in how climate change effects will manifest in the region.

WDFW will use funds provided by the NPLCC to integrate climate change impacts and implications into our State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) Revision.

WDFW will use funds provided by the NPLCC to integrate climate change impacts and implications into our State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) Revision.

This project will apply the results of an on-going climate change vulnerability assessment to the management of two complex landscapes.

Develop an island-wide mangrove adaption and management plan that will incorporate the findings from the comprehensive island-wide mangrove vulnerability assessment that is currently being funded through awards to MCT from the United States DOI Office of Insular Affairs and Fish and Wildlife Serv

The Upper Midwest and Great Lakes (UMGL) and the Eastern Tallgrass Prairie & Big Rivers (ETP) Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) are convening State Wildlife Action Plan Coordinators in the Midwest states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, and Wisconsin t

Improved Gulf Hypoxia Planning Tool: Landscape scale planning tools focus conservation priorities through a series of region-specific lenses.

A collaborative research project sponsored by the National Park Service and the Appalachian LCC seeks to integrate cultural resources, such as historic bridges and Civil War Battlefields, into landscape conservation planning and design to emphasize both natural and cultural resources in defining

FWS and USGS will collaborate to improve the decision science foundation of the South Atlantic Conservation Blueprint. The Blueprint prioritizes areas for shared conservation action in the South Atlantic geography.

The Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative (Desert LCC) is designing a process that will:

The southeast United States’ rivers and streams support the most diverse unionid (freshwater mussel) fauna on earth.  These species are a focus of the GCP LCC because their sensitivity to habitat degradation, fish community changes, and changes in water quality and quantity make them akin to the

The multi-LCC Mississippi River Basin/Gulf Hypoxia Initiative is a joint effort to find the nexus of water quality, wildlife, and people in the Mississippi River Basin.

This project proposes development of a spatial decision support system (DSS) designed to address an identified major conservation goal of the Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers Landscape Conservation Cooperative (ETPBR LCC), in collaboration with adjacent LCCs in the Midwestern U.S.

Monarch butterfly and other pollinators are in trouble. Monarch butterfly habitat— including milkweed host plants and nectar food sources—has declined drastically throughout most of the United States.

The US FWS Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge is associated with a Lower Wabash River LCD team exploring voluntary conservation on public and private lands in a region with fairly cohesive ecology, issues and practices in mixed habitat types of uplands, wetlands and floodplain forest in the ma

Brief:
Under this project a collaborative and integrated geodatabase of inventoried connectivity barriers within the South Central Lake Superior Basin (SCLSB) was developed to prioritize restoration for more than 2,000 inventoried stream crossings. 

The primary objective of this project is to bring together Hawaii's climate change scientists, Molokai's traditional fishpond managers, and other natural resource managers to share scientific and cultural knowledge and work together as a team to identify adaptive management strategies f

This project will complete a tribally-based climate change vulnerability assessment t and adaptation plan for Eulachon that spawn in the Chilkoot and Chilkat rivers near Haines, Alaska.

The Cascadia Parner Forum fosters a network of natural resource practitioners working with the NPLCC and GNLCC to guild the adaptive capacity of the landscape and species living within it.