Projects By Product: Datasets or Database

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives use a collaborative approach to identify landscape scale conservation solutions. LCCs work across jurisdictional and political boundaries to work with partners to: meet unfilled conservation needs, develop decision support tools, share data and knowledge, and facilitate and foster partnerships.

As part of a shared science strategy, LCCs coordinate closely with the National Climate Change and Wildlife Center and the eight regional Climate Science Centers.

The RESTORE Act (33 U.S. Code § 1321) directs 80% of Clean Water Act penalties from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (likely to be in the billions) to Gulf of Mexico restoration.

We will work with Landscape Conservation Cooperative partners to (1) edge match the Oklahoma and Texas Ecological Systems (ECS) data sets, (2) complete an enduring features (ecological site type; geophysical setting) data set for Oklahoma, (3) create a process for up-dating the ECS data set by de

The Desert LCC will provide the 50% of the Federal component of funds, and the work designed will support the science objectives for the Desert LCC and its partners as well as provide needed improvements to the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) in the Lower Colorado River Region, and beyond.

Researchers downscaled projections of maximum and minimum temperature and precipitation across a large extent east of the Rocky Mountains to the Atlantic Coast.  The data is probabilistic in nature, providing flexibility in incorporating climate information into impact assessments.  Statistical t

Habitat loss and degradation due to urban expansion and other human activities have raised concerns for the Western Gulf Coast Mottled Duck population. This species relies on tidal, palustrine, and agricultural wetlands as well as grasslands for all of its life cycle needs.

Alligator Gar, Atractosteus spatula, is an iconic species native to lowland floodplain river systems where they play an important role as top predators and by linking landscapes through their movement. Alligator Gar is also an important native fisheries species in the Trinity River.

This project will result in development of an information management and delivery system to coordinate science communication platforms and to build a catalog inside of the USGS ScienceBase data and information management platform.

The best hope for recovering and maintaining ecosystem function and services for the tallgrass prairie ecosystem is reconstruction.

This project proposes development of a spatial decision support system (DSS) designed to address an identified major conservation goal of the Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers Landscape Conservation Cooperative (ETPBR LCC), in collaboration with adjacent LCCs in the Midwestern U.S.

To evaluate the potential impacts of changes on waterbird habitat due to climate change, this project examines historic responses of water birds to storm surges on the Y-K Delta by examining waterbird distribution and breeding parameters before and after coastal storm surges between 1985 and 2012

No one has better knowledge and opportunity to document coastal storm effects than the people who live in coastal communities. By training a network of Local Environmental Observers to collect coastal storm data, we improve local capacity to engage in coastal observations.

Extensive mapping of coastal change will provide important baseline information on the distribution and magnitude of landscape changes over the past 41 years. With this analysis, changes can be summarized for different land ownership or other units to assess the extent of recent habitat loss.

Storm tides can influence salinity concentrations of ponds on Kigigak Island, which can affect the breeding population of Spectacled Eider found there. This project will expand instrumentation currently collecting data related to pond water levels and salinities, and tidal dynamics.

This project provides travel support for the collection of precision measurements of prioritized benchmarks and submission of these occupations to NOAA NGS for public access.

The primary goal of this project is to facilitate the completion of ShoreZone mapping of biophysical resources of the coastal supratidal, intertidal, and subtidal areas in the southern Alaska Peninsula, and to make this mapping data web accessible and available to all who request the data.

This project will develop a searchable geospatial database for stream and lake water temperature monitoring activities in Alaska.

The goal of this project is to develop a statewide water temperature network with easily understood and readily implemented data standards to support landscape-level assessments.

This project will identify existing coastal change projects in Western Alaska and synthesize information about each project. The resulting report will document the project landscape for communities, researchers, resource managers, and funding agencies.

This project investigates the variability in size and annual growth of juvenile Chinook across western Alaska, the association of juvenile Chinook size or annual growth with stream temperature gradients, and whether expected water temperature changes will affect juvenile Chinook habitat suitabili

This project will compile and analyze existing stream, river and lake temperatures data in SW Alaska, and will result in refinement of the monitoring plan developed to characterize thermal responses to ongoing climate change in the region.

By combining analyses of data from two large lake systems in the Kvichak watershed, laboratory rearing experiments to elucidate functional relationships, and simulation modeling, this project quantifies biological responses to changing freshwater temperature in sockeye salmon in western Alaska.

This project will use ShoreZone imagery collected as part of another partnership effort to map nearly 1,600 km of coastline between Wales and Kotzebue, completing the Kotzebue Sound shoreline for inclusion in the state-wide ShoreZone dataset.

This project will use existing ShoreZone coastal imagery to map 719 km of shoreline in Bristol Bay, from Cape Constantine to Cape Newenham. This section of coastline is an extremely important herring spawning area and an important component of the Bristol Bay fisheries

Partners for Watershed Restoration (PWR) a coalition for the South Central Lake Superior Basin (S.C. Basin) was formed in July 2013 and has already attracted over 30 agencies and organizations including Federal, State, County, Tribal, non-profit, and private.

This project establishes a permafrost observation network at the continuous/discontinuous permafrost boundary of the Western Alaska LCC.

This project focuses on permafrost change and its effect on lake habitat in Western Alaska. Resource managers and local communities need spatially explicit information to determine past lake habitat changes, identify spatial patterns correlated to climate, and project future habitat changes.

The lake and lagoon surface temperature trends and projections that result from this project will fill a fundamental data gap in western Alaska and will be valuable to scientists and land managers for climate change studies, habitat evaluations, and land and resource management decision making.

Water temperature monitoring can provide early warning signs of climate change effects. The products from this project will provide a framework for better understanding trend in the quality of lake environments in relation to climate change.

This project will expand an existing fine-scale storm surge model for the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta. Results will be used to examine the relationship between storm floods and temporal changes in waterbird abundance and nesting locations.

This project will support data collection in the Bering Sea from a Triaxys oceanographic wave buoy to supplement existing stationary sensors.

Nearshore bathymetry is a vital link that joins offshore water depths to coastal topography.

The purpose of this agreement is to initiate SR LCC-wide data discovery, cataloging, and general GIS analysis to characterize the landscape across the SRLCC geographic area.

Will determine patterns and causes of recent population declines in the Haleakala silversword associated with observed climate changes in Hawaii's high-elevation ecosystems.

One common way to conduct species vulnerability assessments (VA) to climate change (CC) is to model species distributions and predict CC-related range shifts.

This project will use projections of sea_level rise and coastal inundation to assess the vulnerability of native plant communities and associated cultural sites in the Main Hawaiian Islands between now and 2100.

This project will develop first-ever maps of ecosystem types (landcover) for the Mariana Islands.

The objective of this experimental research is to determine if genetic enrichment may enhance survival, growth, and adaptation of important native Hawaiian montane plant species to changing precipitation patterns by relocating conspecifics to more favorable climate regimes at higher elevation.

Past analysis has shown that temperature-dependent avian malaria is likely to reduce overall available Hawaiian forest bird habitat with temperature increases.

During 2015, Dr. Romanach will work with the steering committee and PFLCC staff on identifying and setting conservation targets

This project will build a Geographic Information System (GIS) database for the Plains and Prairie Potholes LCC comprised of1) wetland abundance, 2) land cover, 3) primary productivity, and 4) wetness.

This project will conduct numerical climate change projection experiments for Hawaii through development and application of a nested regional atmospheric modeling system with high resolution over limited areas.

Project will identify exposure of coastal native ecosystems by mapping potential impacts, thus allowing for an assessment of ecosystem vulnerability.

This project will build on existing experience with statistical downscaling methods to derive comprehensive estimates of the future rainfall changes over the Hawaiian Islands for the mid and late 21st century (2046-2065 and 2080-2100, respectively).

The goal of this ongoing project is to ensure continued operation and maintenance of the HaleNet climate and ecosystem monitoring network, including field operations, equipment maintenance and replacement, sensor recalibration, data communication improvements, data screening/archival, data analys

This project will predict future distributions of cloud forests and species across high mountain ecosystems in Hawaii, which are experiencing rapid rates of climate change.

This endeavor will provide datasets and information in support of the PIRCA, the first comprehensive climate assessment of the Pacific Islands region. Specific work includes climatological and time series data for Wind, Currents, Waves, SST, Chlorophyll, and PAR at each of the U.S.

Ensembles of corrected IPCC AR5 climate models will be used to project SST, pCO2, and salinity in the insular Pacific. Projections of coral bleaching risk and aragonite saturation state will be used to project years for all reef locations beyond which reefs are likely to rapidly degrade.

Using biocultural and participatory approaches, we will carry out an in-depth study of traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) in Ka'upulehu, Hawaii Island.

This effort will use GCM and coupled numerical wave model output to provide hourly data and statistical measures (mean and top 5% values) of wave height, wave period, wave direction, wind speed, and wind direction for 15 DOI-managed coastal assets (parks and refuges) in the Pacific Ocean for the