Projects By Category: Population and Habitat Evaluation or Projection

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives use a collaborative approach to identify landscape-scale conservation solutions. LCCs work across jurisdictional and political boundaries to work with partners to: meet unfilled conservation needs, develop decision support tools, share data and knowledge and facilitate and foster partnerships.

As part of a shared science strategy, LCCs coordinate closely with the National Climate Change and Wildlife Center and the eight regional Climate Science Centers as well as Migratory Bird Joint Ventures and National Fish Habitat Partnerships across North America.

  • Great Northern

The bull trout is an ESA-listed species that relies on cold stream environments across the Northwest and is expected to decline with climate change.

  • Great Northern

This project is intended to advance wolverine conservation across the Rocky Mountains and North Cascades in the contiguous United States.

  • Great Northern

Existing climate change science and guidance for restoring and maintaining whitebark pine forests will be evaluated using landscape simulation modeling to inform implementation of the Greater Yellowstone Coordinating Committee (GYCC) Whitebark Pine (WBP) subcommittees WBP Strategy.

  • Great Northern

For the past six years, the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) has funded the USGS to study fish responses to restoration efforts and to construct a model relating stream habitat with fish population dynamics in the Methow River Basin, a tributary of the Columbia River.

  • Great Northern

The Washington Connected Landscapes Project will provide a framework to address the interacting impacts of habitat fragmentation and climate change on ecological systems and wildlife species within the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GNLCC) boundary.

  • Great Northern

Sagebrush (Artemisia spp.)-dominated shrublands are one of the most widespread ecosystems in western North America but also among the most imperiled due to interactions among land use, fire, and exotic plants.

  • North Atlantic

The North Atlantic Region of the United States and Canada boasts diverse habitats, from coasts to mountains, that support endemic and rare plant species. However, recent conservation actions and prioritization efforts in this region have neglected to include plants.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

The decline in the monarch butterfly has led to it being considered for listing under the Endangered Species Act.

  • Desert

In response to the rapid and dramatic hydroecological deterioration of the Rio Grande through Big Bend, the Big Bend Conservation Cooperative (BBCC), a multi-disciplinary group of natural resource agencies, research institutions, and conservation organizations have been organizing and implementin

  • South Atlantic

The proposed project focuses upon two major goals:
1. Designate Priority Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Areas (PARCAs) in the South Atlantic Landscape, and develop an adaptive management plan for those areas.

  • South Atlantic

In 2012, the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (SALCC) began development of its process to select natural resource indicators and targets as specific landscape scale measures of success for natural resources.

  • South Atlantic

The primary objective of this project is to develop a short synthesis report assessing 11 habitats, using a variety of ecological indicators.

  • South Atlantic

The South Atlantic LCC is seeking technical assistance in the testing process for their newly chosen terrestrial natural resource indicators (http://www.southatlanticlcc.org/indicators).

  • South Atlantic

The South Atlantic LCC is seeking technical assistance in evaluating the past, current, and future condition of the ecological systems of the South Atlantic.

  • South Atlantic

Goals: The Project Partners will work to improve the connection between restricted range and at-risk species conservation and the South Atlantic Conservation Blueprint.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

Submersed aquatic vegetation, a critical component of highly productive coastal ecosystems, is greatly affected by sea level rise.

  • Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers

The goal of the project is to determine biodiversity impacts of land restoration associated with
clean and renewable energy development; specifically, natural gas production through
anaerobic digestion of hog manure and native plant material, as being forwarded by Roeslein

  • South Atlantic

This proposal outlines a collaborative regional effort to build a South Atlantic Ecosystem Model that will facilitate the connection of inland and coastal marine management strategies and actions to potential resource and economic impacts in estuarine and coastal marine environments, with the fol

  • Great Plains

Stopover use by migrating shorebirds is affected by patch-level characteristics of habitat, but the relative influence of broadscale  factors is poorly understood.

  • Desert

There are few resources that provide managers cross-scale information for planning climate adaptation strategies for species and taxa at risk. Appropriate allocation of resources requires an understanding of mechanisms influencing a species’ risk to global change. Dr.

  • Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers

In June 2015, the Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) granted $80,000 to the City of St.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

Habitat loss and degradation due to urban expansion and other human activities have raised concerns for the Western Gulf Coast Mottled Duck population. This species relies on tidal, palustrine, and agricultural wetlands as well as grasslands for all of its life cycle needs.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

Flow alteration -- from new and existing water supply projects, increased urbanization, and drought conditions -- is a pervasive threat to aquatic wildlife throughout the Gulf Coast Prairie region.  One species susceptible to this threat is Guadalupe Bass, an economically and ecologically importa

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

Alligator Gar, Atractosteus spatula, is an iconic species native to lowland floodplain river systems where they play an important role as top predators and by linking landscapes through their movement. Alligator Gar is also an important native fisheries species in the Trinity River.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

The southeast United States’ rivers and streams support the most diverse unionid (freshwater mussel) fauna on earth.  These species are a focus of the GCP LCC because their sensitivity to habitat degradation, fish community changes, and changes in water quality and quantity make them akin to the

  • Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers

This project proposes development of a spatial decision support system (DSS) designed to address an identified major conservation goal of the Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers Landscape Conservation Cooperative (ETPBR LCC), in collaboration with adjacent LCCs in the Midwestern U.S.

  • Western Alaska

To evaluate the potential impacts of changes on waterbird habitat due to climate change, this project examines historic responses of water birds to storm surges on the Y-K Delta by examining waterbird distribution and breeding parameters before and after coastal storm surges between 1985 and 2012

  • Western Alaska

Storm tides can influence salinity concentrations of ponds on Kigigak Island, which can affect the breeding population of Spectacled Eider found there. This project will expand instrumentation currently collecting data related to pond water levels and salinities, and tidal dynamics.

  • Western Alaska

This project investigates the variability in size and annual growth of juvenile Chinook across western Alaska, the association of juvenile Chinook size or annual growth with stream temperature gradients, and whether expected water temperature changes will affect juvenile Chinook habitat suitabili

  • Western Alaska

By combining analyses of data from two large lake systems in the Kvichak watershed, laboratory rearing experiments to elucidate functional relationships, and simulation modeling, this project quantifies biological responses to changing freshwater temperature in sockeye salmon in western Alaska.

  • Western Alaska

This project will expand an existing fine-scale storm surge model for the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta. Results will be used to examine the relationship between storm floods and temporal changes in waterbird abundance and nesting locations.

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes

Mayflies (Ephemeroptera), stoneflies (Plecoptera), and caddisflies (Trichoptera) (a.k.a. EPT taxa) are the most environmentally sensitive of freshwater insects. They are utilized the world over as indicators of water quality in flowing waters.

  • Western Alaska

Mid-winter icing events have the potential to lead to population declines of caribou due to restricted access to forage.

  • Western Alaska

This project develops a modeling framework that integrates the driving components for and the interactions among disturbance regimes, permafrost dynamics, hydrology, and vegetation succession/migration for the state of Alaska.

  • Western Alaska

Caribou in southwest Alaska are an important subsistence resource and a potential indicator of ecosystem function. Understanding caribou population declines requires understanding tundra dynamics and habitat quality. This project will establish baseline information on population.

  • South Atlantic

This project: 1) Maps out current and future levels of habitat connectivity in the South Atlantic region, from the standpoint of multiple groups of terrestrial wildlife species and 2) Prioritizes key corridors and linkage areas based on their relative importance and centrality within the overall

  • Pacific Islands

One of the greatest ecological, social and economic issues of the day is the problem of climate change. Increasing levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere are increasing global temperatures.

  • Pacific Islands

Islands exhibit the planet’s most unique flora and fauna, but biodiversity on islands is also vulnerable to the impending forces of global change.

  • Pacific Islands

We analyzed the chemical composition of wood produced by Māmane, a tropical tree growing in Hawai’i, in order to reconstruct changes in climate over the Hawaiian Islands.

  • Pacific Islands

Pelagic seabirds (albatrosses and petrels) find food by relying on distinct oceanographic features like transition zones, upwelling, and large eddies.

  • Pacific Islands

Coral reef ecosystems are exposed to a diverse suite of environmental forcing.

  • Pacific Islands

This report is published as one of a series of technical inputs to the National Climate Assessment (NCA) 2013 report.

  • Pacific Islands

Coral reefs are seriously threatened by ocean acidification and climate change impacts like coral bleaching. Importantly though, the degree of threat varies for different coral reef areas due to differences in local and regional climate drivers.

  • Pacific Islands

Our project focuses on understanding patterns and causes of recent population declines in the Haleakala silversword that are associated with decreasing precipitation, increasing temperature, and related climate changes in Hawaii’s high-elevation ecosystems.

  • Pacific Islands

In Hawaiʽi and elsewhere, research efforts have focused on two main approaches to determine the potential impacts of climate change on individual species: estimating species vulnerabilities and projecting responses of species to expected changes.

  • Pacific Islands

The objective of this experimental research is to determine if genetic enrichment may enhance survival, growth, and adaptation of important native Hawaiian montane plant species to changing precipitation patterns by relocating conspecifics to more favorable climate regimes at higher elevation.

  • Pacific Islands

Past analysis has shown that temperature-dependent avian malaria is likely to reduce overall available Hawaiian forest bird habitat with temperature increases.

  • Pacific Islands

Sea-level rise (SLR) is one of the biggest threats to the Hawaiian coastline, and resource managers of coastal wetlands in Hawai‘i must begin planning now for future impacts. The majority of these impacts are expected to occur from 2040 – 2100.

  • Pacific Islands

To anticipate how weather is likely to change as a result of increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases (such as carbon dioxide) in the atmosphere, geophysical and meteorological scientists examined the results of climate models on the fine scale climate patterns of Hawai’i to understand what

  • Pacific Islands

Expansion of deadly, mosquito-borne bird diseases such as avian malaria into Hawaiʽi’s high elevation forests as a result of global warming is one of the most significant threats facing the state’s rare native forest birds.