Projects By Category: Population and Habitat Evaluation or Projection

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives use a collaborative approach to identify landscape-scale conservation solutions. LCCs work across jurisdictional and political boundaries to work with partners to: meet unfilled conservation needs, develop decision support tools, share data and knowledge and facilitate and foster partnerships.

As part of a shared science strategy, LCCs coordinate closely with the National Climate Change and Wildlife Center and the eight regional Climate Science Centers as well as Migratory Bird Joint Ventures and National Fish Habitat Partnerships across North America.

  • South Atlantic

Marshes are a critical habitat for a diversity of fauna and the ecological functioning of the coast.

  • Great Basin

FY2015The Northwestern Great Basin ecoregion is one of the most intact ecosystems in the west. It is also a biological hotspot for migratory birds, greater sage-grouse and a stronghold for pronghorn antelope.

  • Great Basin

FY2017This dataset provides a near-real-time estimate of 2017 herbaceous annual cover with an emphasis on annual grass (Boyte and Wylie. 2016. Near-real-time cheatrass percent cover in the Northern Great Basin, USA, 2015.

  • Great Basin

FY2016Develop and utilize both correlative and experimental approaches to evaluate effects of different intensities of spring cattle grazing on sage-grouse habitat selection, insect abundance, and sage-grouse demographic and behavioral traits.

  • Great Basin

FY2016This project will evaluate the effects of vegetation treatments on population connectivity, genetic diversity and gene flow of wildlife species across the full extent of the Great Basin LCC.

  • Great Basin

FY2015Collaborators are investigating the effect of low rise dams water supply, ecosystem functions and health, and habitat for a wide range of organisms, including sage grouse.

  • Great Basin

FY2014This project builds upon the springs and seeps inventory funded by the Desert LCC.

This project will:

  • Great Basin

FY2016Monitor the diversity and abundance of winged insects (including Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, and Hemiptera), which include many key insect pollinators, using an array of passive and active trapping methods.

  • Great Basin

FY2015The Great Basin Region, which covers much of Nevada, and portions of California, Oregon, Idaho, and Utah, managers are already confronting a changing climate and are beginning to make management decisions despite uncertainty in how climate change effects will manifest in the region.

  • Great Basin

FY2014The purpose of this project is to develop a series of high resolution (1:24,000 scale) digital wetland maps and associated data to support conservation planning in Nevada.

  • Great Basin

FY2015Persistent ecosystem and anthropogenic disturbances and stressors are threatening sustainability of sagebrush ecosystems in the western US, and managers and policy makers are seeking strategic, holistic approaches for species conservation and ecosystem restoration.

  • Great Basin

FY2011Aspen populations are in decline across western North America due to altered fire regimes, herbivory, drought, pathogens, and competition with conifers.

  • Great Basin

FY2013“The loss of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.) on sites disturbed by fire has motivated many restoration seeding and planting efforts. However, the resulting sagebrush establishment is often lower than desired, especially in dry areas.

  • Great Basin

FY2017The Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy Actionable Science Plan places a high priority on assessing control measures for invasive annual grasses, which provide fuel for rangeland fire and impede restoration of desirable perennials.

  • Great Basin

FY2017Increasing effectiveness of post-fire treatments is a management priority, such as is emphasized in Secretarial Order #3336 on rangeland fire and restoration, which prescribes a programmatic, longer-term approach that accommodates the layering of different treatments in sagebrush-steppe ran

  • Great Basin

FY2014The project team surveyed land managers working on invasive weeds in the west. These surveys provided information for the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife (WAFWA) Wildfire and Invasive Species Initiative Working Group.

  • Great Basin

FY2015Study the wildlife impacts of the Bruneau-Owyhee Sage-grouse Habitat (BOSH) project.

  • North Pacific

WDFW will use funds provided by the NPLCC to integrate climate change impacts and implications into our State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) Revision.

  • North Pacific

WDFW will use funds provided by the NPLCC to integrate climate change impacts and implications into our State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) Revision.

  • North Pacific

The Jamestown SKlallam and Port Gamble SKlallam tribes, and many other tribes in the PacificNorthwest, rely on ESA listed fish species for subsistence as well as cultural and economic practices.Concern has grown over the impacts climate change might have throughout the 21st Century ontraditional

  • North Pacific

Background: Yellow-cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis) is an economically and culturally important tree of the North Pacific coastal rainforest, ranging from northern California through Southeast Alaska.

  • North Pacific

The Humboldt Bay-Eel River region may experience the highest rate of relative sea level rise increase along the West Coast. The Project will engage stakeholders to discuss community and science needs for planning and implementing adaptation measures to sea level rise.

  • North Pacific

The Humboldt Bay-Eel River region may experience the highest rate of relative sea level rise increase along the West Coast. The Project will engage stakeholders to discuss community and science needs for planning and implementing adaptation measures to sea level rise.

  • Great Northern

The bull trout is an ESA-listed species that relies on cold stream environments across the Northwest and is expected to decline with climate change.

  • Great Northern

This project is intended to advance wolverine conservation across the Rocky Mountains and North Cascades in the contiguous United States.

  • Great Northern

Existing climate change science and guidance for restoring and maintaining whitebark pine forests will be evaluated using landscape simulation modeling to inform implementation of the Greater Yellowstone Coordinating Committee (GYCC) Whitebark Pine (WBP) subcommittees WBP Strategy.

  • Great Northern

For the past six years, the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) has funded the USGS to study fish responses to restoration efforts and to construct a model relating stream habitat with fish population dynamics in the Methow River Basin, a tributary of the Columbia River.

  • Great Northern

The Washington Connected Landscapes Project will provide a framework to address the interacting impacts of habitat fragmentation and climate change on ecological systems and wildlife species within the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GNLCC) boundary.

  • Great Northern

Sagebrush (Artemisia spp.)-dominated shrublands are one of the most widespread ecosystems in western North America but also among the most imperiled due to interactions among land use, fire, and exotic plants.

  • North Atlantic

The North Atlantic Region of the United States and Canada boasts diverse habitats, from coasts to mountains, that support endemic and rare plant species. However, recent conservation actions and prioritization efforts in this region have neglected to include plants.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

The decline in the monarch butterfly has led to it being considered for listing under the Endangered Species Act.

  • Desert

In response to the rapid and dramatic hydroecological deterioration of the Rio Grande through Big Bend, the Big Bend Conservation Cooperative (BBCC), a multi-disciplinary group of natural resource agencies, research institutions, and conservation organizations have been organizing and implementin

  • South Atlantic

The proposed project focuses upon two major goals:
1. Designate Priority Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Areas (PARCAs) in the South Atlantic Landscape, and develop an adaptive management plan for those areas.

  • South Atlantic

In 2012, the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (SALCC) began development of its process to select natural resource indicators and targets as specific landscape scale measures of success for natural resources.

  • South Atlantic

The primary objective of this project is to develop a short synthesis report assessing 11 habitats, using a variety of ecological indicators.

  • South Atlantic

The South Atlantic LCC is seeking technical assistance in the testing process for their newly chosen terrestrial natural resource indicators (http://www.southatlanticlcc.org/indicators).

  • South Atlantic

The South Atlantic LCC is seeking technical assistance in evaluating the past, current, and future condition of the ecological systems of the South Atlantic.

  • South Atlantic

Goals: The Project Partners will work to improve the connection between restricted range and at-risk species conservation and the South Atlantic Conservation Blueprint.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

Submersed aquatic vegetation, a critical component of highly productive coastal ecosystems, is greatly affected by sea level rise.

  • Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers

The goal of the project is to determine biodiversity impacts of land restoration associated with clean and renewable energy development; specifically, natural gas production through anaerobic digestion of hog manure and native plant material, as being forwarded by Roeslein Alternative Energy (RAE

  • South Atlantic

This proposal outlines a collaborative regional effort to build a South Atlantic Ecosystem Model that will facilitate the connection of inland and coastal marine management strategies and actions to potential resource and economic impacts in estuarine and coastal marine environments, with the fol

  • Great Plains

Stopover use by migrating shorebirds is affected by patch-level characteristics of habitat, but the relative influence of broadscale  factors is poorly understood.

  • Desert

There are few resources that provide managers cross-scale information for planning climate adaptation strategies for species and taxa at risk. Appropriate allocation of resources requires an understanding of mechanisms influencing a species’ risk to global change. Dr.

  • Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers

In June 2015, the Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) granted $80,000 to the City of St.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

Habitat loss and degradation due to urban expansion and other human activities have raised concerns for the Western Gulf Coast Mottled Duck population. This species relies on tidal, palustrine, and agricultural wetlands as well as grasslands for all of its life cycle needs.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

Flow alteration -- from new and existing water supply projects, increased urbanization, and drought conditions -- is a pervasive threat to aquatic wildlife throughout the Gulf Coast Prairie region.  One species susceptible to this threat is Guadalupe Bass, an economically and ecologically importa

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

Alligator Gar, Atractosteus spatula, is an iconic species native to lowland floodplain river systems where they play an important role as top predators and by linking landscapes through their movement. Alligator Gar is also an important native fisheries species in the Trinity River.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

The southeast United States’ rivers and streams support the most diverse unionid (freshwater mussel) fauna on earth.  These species are a focus of the GCP LCC because their sensitivity to habitat degradation, fish community changes, and changes in water quality and quantity make them akin to the

  • Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers

This project proposes development of a spatial decision support system (DSS) designed to address an identified major conservation goal of the Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers Landscape Conservation Cooperative (ETPBR LCC), in collaboration with adjacent LCCs in the Midwestern U.S.

  • Western Alaska

Storm tides can influence salinity concentrations of ponds on Kigigak Island, which can affect the breeding population of Spectacled Eider found there. This project will expand instrumentation currently collecting data related to pond water levels and salinities, and tidal dynamics.