Projects By Category: Traditional Ecological Knowledge

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives use a collaborative approach to identify landscape-scale conservation solutions. LCCs work across jurisdictional and political boundaries to work with partners to: meet unfilled conservation needs, develop decision support tools, share data and knowledge and facilitate and foster partnerships.

As part of a shared science strategy, LCCs coordinate closely with the National Climate Change and Wildlife Center and the eight regional Climate Science Centers as well as Migratory Bird Joint Ventures and National Fish Habitat Partnerships across North America.

  • Arctic

The Beaufort Sea coast in Arctic Alaska and neighboring northern Canada has recently experienced extreme and accelerated climate change, including a dramatic reduction in summer sea ice.

  • Aleutian and Bering Sea Islands
  • Arctic
  • Western Alaska

In Alaska, changes in snow, ice, and weather, have resulted in risks to human lives, infrastructure damage, threats to valuable natural resources, and disruption of hunting, fishing, and livelihoods.

  • California

Most natural resource managers, planners and policy makers are now dependent upon spatially explicit environmental suitability and spatial allocation analyses to inform policy and management decisions.

  • Western Alaska

We propose to develop a Yukon-Kuskokwim Berry Outlook: a data- and observer-driven ecological monitoring and modeling framework that forecasts changes in berry habitat and abundance with climate and environmental change.

  • Northwest Boreal

The Yukon North Slope is an arctic “hot spot” of climate change-induced effects with profound significance for the Inuvialuit and the larger region.

  • Northwest Boreal

Landscape conservation design in Alaska is an opportunity for the U.S.

  • Great Basin

FY2016
This project will address limited tribal capacity for vulnerability assessment by providing guidance and data tailored to the needs and capacities of Northwest and Great Basin tribes. Specifically, the project will:

  • North Pacific

The North Pacific LCC co-sponsored the April 2012 science symposium - Coastal Temperate Rainforests: Integrating Communities, Climate Science, and Resource Management.

  • North Pacific

Building on currently available resources and on the prior climate adaptation experiences of our team,
which includes tribal staff and a cultural anthropologist who is also an enrolled member of the

  • North Pacific

The forum will have two major goals:. First, to share the successes and learnings of past LCC investments on the subjects of Traditional Ecological Knowledge, subsistence resources, and climate adaptation plans.

  • Great Northern

The Stoney Nakoda Nation believe that it is important to provide cultural awareness to the Great North Landscape Conservation group so that the group can understand the First Nation history of the study area.

  • Great Northern

Native fish of the Columbia River Basin, and the ecosystems that support them, are an innate and critical part of Nez Perce culture.

  • Pacific Islands

Summary   PICCC Climate Change Adaptation Video Series will be a series of video created in close coordination with the PICCC profiling case studies of climate change adaptation as conducted by conservationists in Hawai`i.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

This project will use existing climate change scenarios and sea-level rise projections to create a Climate Change Adaptation Plan in collaboration with the Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana.

  • Western Alaska

Full Project Title

Project Summary

  • Western Alaska

Bering Sea storms introduce various environmental conditions that adversely affect human activity and infrastructure in the coastal zone and the ecosystems they depend upon.

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes

This project will improve tribal and First Nation engagement in cooperative natural resource conservation efforts.  Researchers are fostering networking among tribes, First Nations and other relevant partners in the upper Midwest – Great Lakes region, and engaging tribal and First Nation represen

  • Western Alaska

To assess the vulnerability of a region to invasive plants, documentation of the presence or absence of invasive plants is necessary. This project expands on work initiated by the EPA to identify invasive plants in rural communities in the Bristol Bay region.

  • Western Alaska

This project evaluates the connections between climate change impacts and health in Bristol Bay communities. Climate change impacts were assessed through the lens of public health, with an eye towards the potential effects on disease, injury, food and water security, and mental health.

  • Pacific Islands

Traditional Ecological Knowledge, or TEK, is “a cumulative body of knowledge, practice and belief, evolving by adaptive processes and handed down through generations by cultural transmission, about the relationships of living beings (including humans) with one another and with their environments.

  • Pacific Islands

The primary objective of this project is to bring together Hawaii's climate change scientists, Molokai's traditional fishpond managers, and other natural resource managers to share scientific and cultural knowledge and work together as a team to identify adaptive management strategies for two of

  • North Pacific

This project will utilize traditional ecological knowledge to establish traditional gathering practices. Interviews will be conducted with traditional gatherers (a.k.a. subsistence) over the last two generations to get baseline data.

  • North Pacific

The overarching goal of the project was to develop overlapping conceptual models of environmental and community health indicators in reference to climate forecasts.

  • North Pacific

This project initiated the first large-scale Tribal government discussions on the relationship of scientific research and traditional knowledge in the activities of the NPLCC. The project: 1.

  • North Pacific

The project had 2 broad objectives. The first objective was to meet the needs of the Yurok Tribe in collecting and documenting TEK to inform tribal planning related to climate change impacts to culturally significant wildlife and habitats that support these species.

  • North Pacific

Central Council Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska (Central Council) assisted the Organized Village of Kasaan (OVK) in their NPLCC grant, Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Climate Change project.

  • North Pacific

This project built on previous National Wildlife Federation work and literature reviews for the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NPLCC).

  • North Pacific

This project obtained information regarding past catastrophic events, such as tsunamis, and TEK through oral history interviews with Tolowa elders regarding the effects of climate change and tsunamis on traditional smelt fishing camps; generated a GIS model of coastal inundation due to sea level

  • North Pacific

A recent (2008-2012) outbreak of Geometrid moths has decimated subsistence berry harvest in South Central Alaska. This project will develop a risk model to predict where subsistence berry plants will be most resistant to Geometrid attack.

  • North Pacific

The Quartz Valley Indian Reservation will partner with tribes, federal agencies and higher education institutions in the Klamath Basin on a tribal youth intern program for the summer of 2014.

  • North Pacific

This project will complete a tribally-based climate change vulnerability assessment t and adaptation plan for Eulachon that spawn in the Chilkoot and Chilkat rivers near Haines, Alaska.

  • North Pacific

For Tribes where significant knowledge of traditional management practices is intact, but where all or part of ancestral lands are managed by other agencies, it is important that the sharing of TEK and implementation of management take place in a manner that promotes rather than hinders Tribal so

  • North Pacific

The project incorporates Heiltsuk Traditional Knowledge and Values into ecosystem-based management planning within Strategic Landscape Reserve Design (SLRD) Landscape Units. The SLRD process seeks to identify areas to set aside from logging (harvesting) over short and long term timeframes.

  • North Pacific

The project incorporates Heiltsuk Traditional Knowledge and Values into ecosystem-based management planning within Strategic Landscape Reserve Design (SLRD) Landscape Units. The SLRD process seeks to identify areas to set aside from logging (harvesting) over short and long term timeframes.

  • Great Northern

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) will identify and implement the goals and objectives outlined in CSKT Climate Change Strategic Plan.

  • Great Northern

The project will establish contact with interested parties in each tribe or first nation within the Crown of the Continent to collect information on all relevant activities and research regarding climate and adaptive management within each tribal nation.

  • Great Northern

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) has been working collaboratively with the Bureau of Land Management and US Forest Service (USFS) to inventory and map current and potential distributions of plant communities which support species of cultural concern on federal la

  • Great Northern

The Western Governors Association has sponsored an assessment of crucial habitats which will be used for the evaluation of landscape-scale energy, land use, and transportation projects.

  • Great Northern

Workshop goals were to gather a diverse group of researchers and management professionals
to focus on three objectives:
Sharing current information regarding the effects of climate change on aquatic ecosystems

  • Great Northern

Colville Tribes Fish and Wildlife scientists will participate in GNLCC meetings in FY2014, so that we can explore our mutual interests, learn about available resources for landscape level assessments, and discover opportunities to expand research and mitigation efforts in our area of the Pacific

  • Great Basin

FY2014
The goals for the project are

  • Desert

Overgrazing and fire suppression have led to a loss of deep soils and vegetative cover in the 420,000 acre Alamosa Creek watershed in southwestern New Mexico.

  • Arctic

The ShoreZone in the Classroom Curriculum Implementation project built upon the ShoreZone in the Classroom Pilot Networking Trip.

  • Arctic

BioMap Alaska is a citizen science observation and information management tool. BioMap Alaska engages residents of coastal communities to voluntarily report observations and local knowledge of marine life.

  • Aleutian and Bering Sea Islands

The Aleutian archipelago is an area that is rich in cultural history. Information about cultural sites and artifacts exists in a variety of formats including peer-reviewed publications, agency reports, and other records.