Resources

LCCs have produced a wealth of informational documents, reports, fact sheets, webinars and more to help support resource managers in designing and delivering conservation at landscape scales.

Meso-carnivore Monitoring Workshop: Project Map Dec 9-10, 2015

Date posted: October 5, 2021

The Southwestern Crown Collaborative (SWCC) brings together residents, interested citizens, business enterprises, and conservation organizations to consider creative solutions in the management of National Forests in the Blackfoot, Clearwater, and Swan River valleys. It is an open, independent, volunteer organization that encourages broad participation by all interested parties.

Date posted: October 5, 2021

The Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program (CLFRP) was established by Congress under

section 4003(a) of Title IV of the Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009 to foster collaborative,

science-based restoration on priority forest landscapes across the United States. Section 4003(b)

describes the eligibility criteria for the program that includes the required elements of a landscape

restoration strategy:





 

Date posted: October 5, 2021

Workshop Materials

Date posted: October 5, 2021

Roads are often identified as sources of ecological process disruption. Roads can damage aquatic ecosystems by altering hydrologic, wood, and sediment regimes, degrade water quality, and reduce habitat suitability for aquatic biota. Often sedimentation is singled out as a premiere contributor to degradation. Over the past half century, thousands of miles of roads have been built across federal lands for a variety of purposes.

Date posted: October 5, 2021

The end of 2014 marked the five-year point of the US Forest Service’s Collaborative Forest

Landscape Restoration Program (CFLRP). The Southwestern Crown Collaborative (SWCC) was

one of the original ten projects across the country selected to receive CFLRP funding. Since

2010, the SWCC Monitoring Committee has been monitoring restoration treatments conducted

on the Flathead, Lolo, and Helena National Forests. We have begun to see results in both

Date posted: October 5, 2021

Water is an extraordinarily precious resource across the United States, particularly in the semi-arid West.  Efforts to manage this resource effectively have often focused on our public lands, which are the source of more than 75% of the water for millions of people.  The challenges associated with managing water sustainably continue to mount with increasing demands, the advent of new stressors like climate change, and other stressors like water quality and habitat degradation associated with expanding watershed development. 

Date posted: October 5, 2021

Executive Summary: This project expands existing efforts and partnerships through citizen science monitoring as a

means to engage and inform local communities about climate and natural resource issues. We believe that resilience

in the landscape and communities can be enhanced through recognition of climate change and a collective search for

adaptation strategies. Coordinators have worked directly with teachers, students, and community volunteers in three

Date posted: October 5, 2021

This document describes the long-term monitoring program of the Southwestern Crown of the

Continent Collaborative (SWCC) developed as part of the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration

Program (CFLRP). It explains the goals, principles, organizational structure, and monitoring approach of

the SWCC. It was developed by the members of the SWCC Monitoring Committee during 2011/2012 and

was reviewed by the full SWCC. It represents a common vision for evaluating and improving forest

Date posted: October 5, 2021

The Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program (CFLRP) is designed to provide up to 10 years of funding to selected initiatives that will implement a landscape strategy to address the risk of uncharacteristic wildfire, restore ecosystems to pre-fire suppression conditions, improve fish and wildlife habitat, improve watersheds, and reduce invasive species. As such, it provides a tremendous opportunity to look collaboratively at a landscape and ask what can be accomplished relative to the CFLRP objectives over a 10 year timeframe.

Date posted: October 5, 2021

Summary: Over the last several decades, tens of thousands of miles of simple dirt and gravel roads have been built across forested public land in the United States. Today, managers from the U.S. Forest Service (and other federal and state agencies) have insufficient funding to maintain these roads and have been directed to begin strategically reducing road densities, despite a lack of public support in many regions.

Date posted: October 5, 2021

This project documented the traditional ecosystem management practices of the Gwich’in and Koyukon community of Beaver, Alaska through the collection of oral histories. The findings provide insight and understanding into the culturally-based rules which guided management and relationships between people, landscapes, and food resources to ensure sustainable yield within the northwest boreal forest and developed a suite of principles for sustainable, productive boreal ecosystems.

Date posted: August 11, 2021

Alaska and Canada’s hundreds of millions of acres of public protected lands are large and currently well-connected, but will face pressures. Providing for landscape connectivity is a core climate adaptation strategy. But shifting treelines, species compositions, and climates make planning for future corridors difficult.Dr. Dawn Magness from the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge uses a method that relies on enduring feature of the landscape that climate change will not change.The project is a collaboration between the NWB LCC and the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge.

Date posted: July 21, 2021

The circumboreal vegetation mapping (CBVM) project is an international collaboration among vegetation
scientists to create a new vegetation map of the boreal region at a 1:7.5 million scale with a common legend and
mapping protocol (Talbot and Meades 2011). The map is intended to portray potential natural vegetation, or the
vegetation that would exist in the absence of human or natural disturbance, rather than existing vegetation that
is commonly generated at larger scales. This report and map contributes to the CBVM effort by developing maps

Date posted: July 21, 2021

The Northwest Boreal Science and Management Research Tool (SMRT) provides the ability to search a vast, curated database for the Northwest Boreal region in one place. Users can explore thousands of curated scholarly articles, state and federal resource reports, land management plans, and unique transboundary datasets. Each entry includes geographic information about the area of study, allowing users to draw a box on a map to narrow searches to information directly related to a specific region in Alaska, the Yukon, British Columbia, and Northwest Territories.

Date posted: July 21, 2021

This pending report will describe and quantify the extent of and trends climate change impacts on fire return intervals in Alaska and Canada's boreal forests.

Date posted: June 13, 2021

This geodatabase contains layers pertaining to the Public Land Survey. It included a pre-settlement landcover polygon shapefile (KankLandcover.shp) for the area of interest in Indiana: Elkhart, Newton, Jasper, Starke, Marshall, and the north and central portion of Kosciusko, and northwest portion of Benton County, Lake, Porter, LaPorte, and St. Joseph Counties as well as the area of interest in Illinois: Will, Kankakee, and Iroquois Counties along with townships within surrounding counties (Grundy, Ford, Vermillion) within the Kankakee watershed .

Date posted: May 7, 2021

Grasslands provide important habitat for monarch butterflies and other pollinators in the southern Great Plains. The main objective of this project was to provide baseline data for assessing the contribution of grassland management practices to monarch/pollinator habitat.

Date posted: February 23, 2021

This region-wide coordinated bird monitoring program, supported by state, federal, tribal, nongovernmental organizations, and two statewide bird conservation partnerships, is designed to provide spatially-referenced baseline data for science-based biological planning and conservation design for the Great Northern LCC and its partners that is directly comparable with other landscapes and BCRs.

Date posted: February 23, 2021

This report summarizes the methods and results of utilizing the Edwards to Gulf Conservation Blueprint to achieve specific tasks for various conservation entities. The goal of this effort is to provide real world examples of the use of our spatial products to ensure that stakeholders understand how to use and incorporate the blueprint into their own decision-making processes. This report covers a suite of demonstration projects that illustrate a variety of tasks likely to be of interest to the broader stakeholder community.

Date posted: February 23, 2021

The Western Gulf Coast (WGC) is home to approximately 90% of the worldwide population of mottled ducks (Anas fulvigula), a non-migratory species that must satisfy its annual cycle needs within a small geographic range. Available population data suggest the WGC mottled duck population has experienced a slight to moderate decline across its range since 1985 (Gulf Coast Joint Venture [GCJV] Mottled Duck Working Group, Unpublished report). Because of its population status and reliance on a restricted geography, the mottled duck has been identified as a focal species for the U.S.

Date posted: February 23, 2021

This spatially-explicit decision support tool identifies wetlands and grasslands that are currently suitable for mottled duck nesting and brood rearing activities as well as identify areas that are priority for grassland establishment and freshwater enhancement for mottled duck nesting and brood rearing activities in the Western Gulf Coast. The identification process is based on key biological parameters such as patch size, land use type, distance to habitat, etc.

Date posted: February 23, 2021
Preview image of CCAST Webinar_July 2020.pdf

CCAST Non-Native Aquatic Species Webinar Series

Webinar recording link here

Date: Thursday 23 July 2020

Presenters: Betsy Grube and Brett Montgomery, Arizona Game and Fish Department, Phoenix, AZ 

Date posted: July 27, 2020
Preview image of CCAST Webinar_June 2020.pdf

CCAST Non-Native Aquatic Species Webinar Series

Webinar recording link here

Date: Tuesday, 23 June 2020

Presenter: Audrey Owens, Ranid Frogs Project Coordinator, Arizona Game and Fish Department

Date posted: June 23, 2020
Preview image of CCAST May 2020 Webinar.pdf

CCAST Non-Native Aquatic Species Webinar Series

Webinar recording link here

Date: Tuesday, 19 May 2020

Presenter: Heidi Blasius, Fisheries Biologist, Bureau of Land Management, Safford Field Office, Arizona

Date posted: June 18, 2020
Preview image of CCAST_April_2020_Webinar.pdf

CCAST Non-Native Aquatic Species Webinar Series

Webinar recording link here

Date: Thursday, 9 April 2020

Presenter: Brian Healy, PhD Candidate, Utah State University and Fisheries Program Manager, Native Fish Ecology and Conservation Program, Grand Canyon National Park

Date posted: June 5, 2020

The Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative Land Cover Map shows land cover at a regional scale (1:2,500,000).  The files provided are graphic design files that can be used to plot a publication-quality, poster-size map.



Scale: 1:2,500,000 



Map poster dimensions: 34 x 44 inches 



Data sources:

Date posted: May 28, 2020

The Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative Shaded Relief Map shows political and physiographic features. The files provided are graphic design files that can be used to plot a publication-quality, poster-size map. 



Scale: 1:2,500,000



Map poster dimensions: 34 x 44 inches



Data sources:

Date posted: May 28, 2020

The Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative Watersheds Map shows hydrographic features including watersheds, streams and lakes at a regional scale. The files provided are graphic design files that can be used to plot a publication-quality, poster-size map. 



Scale: 1:2,500,000



Map poster dimensions: 34 x 44 inches



Data sources: 

Date posted: May 28, 2020

Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative Boundary delineates the spatial extent of the DLCC. The vector boundary is available as both a shapefile and KML file. This is a derivative product of the LCCs shapefile produced by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, accessed from http:/http://www.fws.gov/GIS/data/national/ in 2014.



Date posted: May 28, 2020

DLCC_Basemap_ArcMap10_3.zip (296 MB) contains GIS data, layer files, and an ArcMap 10.3 map document.



The items in the zip file include:

DLCC_Annotation - Annotation for labelling

DLCC_Boundary - The DLCC boundary from US Fish and Wildlife Service

DLCC_Cities - Selected cities from National Atlas

DLCC_Elevation - Spot elevation from National Atlas

Date posted: May 28, 2020

The Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative Grasslands Map symbolizes grasslands from both the USGS National Land Cover Dataset and INEGI Uso de Suelo y vegetación datasets. The two datasets are displayed side by side at the US-Mexico border. The data are displayed at a regional scale (1:2,500,000).  The files provided are graphic design files that can be used to plot a publication-quality, poster-size map. 



Scale: 1:2,500,000  



Map poster dimensions: 34 x 44 inches  



Data sources: 

Date posted: May 28, 2020

The Transboundary Madrean Watersheds Landscape Conservation Design (LCD) was developed as part of an effort initiated by the Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative (Desert LCC). The Desert LCC was a program of the Bureau of Reclamation and the US Fish and Wildlife Service to address large-scale landscape conservation in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico.

Date posted: May 20, 2020

The Transboundary Madrean Watersheds Landscape Conservation Design (LCD) was developed as part of an effort initiated by the Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative (Desert LCC). The Desert LCC was a program of the Bureau of Reclamation and the US Fish and Wildlife Service to address large-scale landscape conservation in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico.

Date posted: May 20, 2020

The Transboundary Madrean Watersheds Landscape Conservation Design (LCD) was developed as part of an effort initiated by the Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative (Desert LCC). The Desert LCC was a program of the Bureau of Reclamation and the US Fish and Wildlife Service to address large-scale landscape conservation in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico.

Date posted: May 20, 2020

The Transboundary Madrean Watersheds Landscape Conservation Design (LCD) was developed as part of an effort initiated by the Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative (Desert LCC). The Desert LCC was a program of the Bureau of Reclamation and the US Fish and Wildlife Service to address large-scale landscape conservation in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico.

Date posted: May 20, 2020

Flow alteration -- from new and existing water supply projects, increased urbanization, and drought conditions -- is a pervasive threat to aquatic wildlife throughout the Gulf Coast Prairie region. One species susceptible to this threat is Guadalupe Bass, an economically and ecologically important black bass species endemic to Texas. The area encompassing their range is projected to experience some of the highest population growth in Texas, placing increased demands on the aquifers and watersheds of this region.

Date posted: March 31, 2020

The Great Plains Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GPLCC) has participated in watershedbased conservation planning efforts which identify flow protection and restoration strategies as priority conservation actions to conserve native fishes in the Great Plains. Through this initiative, the Great Plains Environmental Flow Information Toolkit (GP EFIT) was developed to inform identification of voluntary environmental flow protection and restoration strategies.

Date posted: February 14, 2020

The Great Plains Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GPLCC) has participated in watershedbased conservation planning efforts which identify flow protection and restoration strategies as priority conservation actions to conserve native fishes in the Great Plains. Through this initiative, the Great Plains Environmental Flow Information Toolkit (GP EFIT) was developed to inform identification of voluntary environmental flow protection and restoration strategies.

Date posted: February 14, 2020

Feature class data was designed to support the development of the Environmental Flows Information Toolkit (EFIT) a geospatial application initiated by Texas Parks and Wildlife (TPWD). The EFIT is a web-based tool built around conservation problem solving using innovative data and integrated statistical models. The objective of this application is to identify and prioritize opportunity areas for streamflow conservation within the Great Plains of Texas.

Date posted: February 14, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 ecosystem service that could benefit most from collaborative conservation, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that service across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red.

Date posted: February 7, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 montane habitat fragmentation and loss stressor, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas where they work were given a tally for each of the top 3 stressors that participants chose.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 invasive and problematic plant stressor for grasslands in the Chihuahuan Desert, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 invasive and problematic plant stressor for riparian areas in the Chihuahuan Desert, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 invasive animal stressor for grasslands in the Chihuahuan Desert, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 invasive animal stressor for montane areas in the Chihuahuan Desert, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 invasive animal stressor for riparian areas in the Chihuahuan Desert, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 grassland ecosystem functionality stressor, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas where they work were given a tally for each of the top 3 stressors that participants chose.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 montane ecosystem functionality stressor, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas where they work were given a tally for each of the top 3 stressors that participants chose.

Date posted: January 30, 2020