Resources

LCCs have produced a wealth of informational documents, reports, fact sheets, webinars and more to help support resource managers in designing and delivering conservation at landscape scales.

Grasslands provide important habitat for monarch butterflies and other pollinators in the southern Great Plains. The main objective of this project was to provide baseline data for assessing the contribution of grassland management practices to monarch/pollinator habitat.

Date posted: February 23, 2021

This region-wide coordinated bird monitoring program, supported by state, federal, tribal, nongovernmental organizations, and two statewide bird conservation partnerships, is designed to provide spatially-referenced baseline data for science-based biological planning and conservation design for the Great Northern LCC and its partners that is directly comparable with other landscapes and BCRs.

Date posted: February 23, 2021

This report summarizes the methods and results of utilizing the Edwards to Gulf Conservation Blueprint to achieve specific tasks for various conservation entities. The goal of this effort is to provide real world examples of the use of our spatial products to ensure that stakeholders understand how to use and incorporate the blueprint into their own decision-making processes. This report covers a suite of demonstration projects that illustrate a variety of tasks likely to be of interest to the broader stakeholder community.

Date posted: February 23, 2021

The Western Gulf Coast (WGC) is home to approximately 90% of the worldwide population of mottled ducks (Anas fulvigula), a non-migratory species that must satisfy its annual cycle needs within a small geographic range. Available population data suggest the WGC mottled duck population has experienced a slight to moderate decline across its range since 1985 (Gulf Coast Joint Venture [GCJV] Mottled Duck Working Group, Unpublished report). Because of its population status and reliance on a restricted geography, the mottled duck has been identified as a focal species for the U.S.

Date posted: February 23, 2021

This spatially-explicit decision support tool identifies wetlands and grasslands that are currently suitable for mottled duck nesting and brood rearing activities as well as identify areas that are priority for grassland establishment and freshwater enhancement for mottled duck nesting and brood rearing activities in the Western Gulf Coast. The identification process is based on key biological parameters such as patch size, land use type, distance to habitat, etc.

Date posted: February 23, 2021
Preview image of CCAST Webinar_July 2020.pdf

CCAST Non-Native Aquatic Species Webinar Series

Webinar recording link here

Date: Thursday 23 July 2020

Presenters: Betsy Grube and Brett Montgomery, Arizona Game and Fish Department, Phoenix, AZ 

Date posted: July 27, 2020
Preview image of CCAST Webinar_June 2020.pdf

CCAST Non-Native Aquatic Species Webinar Series

Webinar recording link here

Date: Tuesday, 23 June 2020

Presenter: Audrey Owens, Ranid Frogs Project Coordinator, Arizona Game and Fish Department

Date posted: June 23, 2020
Preview image of CCAST May 2020 Webinar.pdf

CCAST Non-Native Aquatic Species Webinar Series

Webinar recording link here

Date: Tuesday, 19 May 2020

Presenter: Heidi Blasius, Fisheries Biologist, Bureau of Land Management, Safford Field Office, Arizona

Date posted: June 18, 2020
Preview image of CCAST_April_2020_Webinar.pdf

CCAST Non-Native Aquatic Species Webinar Series

Webinar recording link here

Date: Thursday, 9 April 2020

Presenter: Brian Healy, PhD Candidate, Utah State University and Fisheries Program Manager, Native Fish Ecology and Conservation Program, Grand Canyon National Park

Date posted: June 5, 2020

The Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative Land Cover Map shows land cover at a regional scale (1:2,500,000).  The files provided are graphic design files that can be used to plot a publication-quality, poster-size map.



Scale: 1:2,500,000 



Map poster dimensions: 34 x 44 inches 



Data sources:

Date posted: May 28, 2020

The Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative Shaded Relief Map shows political and physiographic features. The files provided are graphic design files that can be used to plot a publication-quality, poster-size map. 



Scale: 1:2,500,000



Map poster dimensions: 34 x 44 inches



Data sources:

Date posted: May 28, 2020

The Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative Watersheds Map shows hydrographic features including watersheds, streams and lakes at a regional scale. The files provided are graphic design files that can be used to plot a publication-quality, poster-size map. 



Scale: 1:2,500,000



Map poster dimensions: 34 x 44 inches



Data sources: 

Date posted: May 28, 2020

Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative Boundary delineates the spatial extent of the DLCC. The vector boundary is available as both a shapefile and KML file. This is a derivative product of the LCCs shapefile produced by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, accessed from http:/http://www.fws.gov/GIS/data/national/ in 2014.



Date posted: May 28, 2020

DLCC_Basemap_ArcMap10_3.zip (296 MB) contains GIS data, layer files, and an ArcMap 10.3 map document.



The items in the zip file include:

DLCC_Annotation - Annotation for labelling

DLCC_Boundary - The DLCC boundary from US Fish and Wildlife Service

DLCC_Cities - Selected cities from National Atlas

DLCC_Elevation - Spot elevation from National Atlas

Date posted: May 28, 2020

The Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative Grasslands Map symbolizes grasslands from both the USGS National Land Cover Dataset and INEGI Uso de Suelo y vegetación datasets. The two datasets are displayed side by side at the US-Mexico border. The data are displayed at a regional scale (1:2,500,000).  The files provided are graphic design files that can be used to plot a publication-quality, poster-size map. 



Scale: 1:2,500,000  



Map poster dimensions: 34 x 44 inches  



Data sources: 

Date posted: May 28, 2020

The Transboundary Madrean Watersheds Landscape Conservation Design (LCD) was developed as part of an effort initiated by the Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative (Desert LCC). The Desert LCC was a program of the Bureau of Reclamation and the US Fish and Wildlife Service to address large-scale landscape conservation in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico.

Date posted: May 20, 2020

The Transboundary Madrean Watersheds Landscape Conservation Design (LCD) was developed as part of an effort initiated by the Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative (Desert LCC). The Desert LCC was a program of the Bureau of Reclamation and the US Fish and Wildlife Service to address large-scale landscape conservation in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico.

Date posted: May 20, 2020

The Transboundary Madrean Watersheds Landscape Conservation Design (LCD) was developed as part of an effort initiated by the Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative (Desert LCC). The Desert LCC was a program of the Bureau of Reclamation and the US Fish and Wildlife Service to address large-scale landscape conservation in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico.

Date posted: May 20, 2020

The Transboundary Madrean Watersheds Landscape Conservation Design (LCD) was developed as part of an effort initiated by the Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative (Desert LCC). The Desert LCC was a program of the Bureau of Reclamation and the US Fish and Wildlife Service to address large-scale landscape conservation in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico.

Date posted: May 20, 2020

Flow alteration -- from new and existing water supply projects, increased urbanization, and drought conditions -- is a pervasive threat to aquatic wildlife throughout the Gulf Coast Prairie region. One species susceptible to this threat is Guadalupe Bass, an economically and ecologically important black bass species endemic to Texas. The area encompassing their range is projected to experience some of the highest population growth in Texas, placing increased demands on the aquifers and watersheds of this region.

Date posted: March 31, 2020

The Great Plains Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GPLCC) has participated in watershedbased conservation planning efforts which identify flow protection and restoration strategies as priority conservation actions to conserve native fishes in the Great Plains. Through this initiative, the Great Plains Environmental Flow Information Toolkit (GP EFIT) was developed to inform identification of voluntary environmental flow protection and restoration strategies.

Date posted: February 14, 2020

The Great Plains Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GPLCC) has participated in watershedbased conservation planning efforts which identify flow protection and restoration strategies as priority conservation actions to conserve native fishes in the Great Plains. Through this initiative, the Great Plains Environmental Flow Information Toolkit (GP EFIT) was developed to inform identification of voluntary environmental flow protection and restoration strategies.

Date posted: February 14, 2020

Feature class data was designed to support the development of the Environmental Flows Information Toolkit (EFIT) a geospatial application initiated by Texas Parks and Wildlife (TPWD). The EFIT is a web-based tool built around conservation problem solving using innovative data and integrated statistical models. The objective of this application is to identify and prioritize opportunity areas for streamflow conservation within the Great Plains of Texas.

Date posted: February 14, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 ecosystem service that could benefit most from collaborative conservation, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that service across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red.

Date posted: February 7, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 montane habitat fragmentation and loss stressor, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas where they work were given a tally for each of the top 3 stressors that participants chose.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 invasive and problematic plant stressor for grasslands in the Chihuahuan Desert, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 invasive and problematic plant stressor for riparian areas in the Chihuahuan Desert, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 invasive animal stressor for grasslands in the Chihuahuan Desert, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 invasive animal stressor for montane areas in the Chihuahuan Desert, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 invasive animal stressor for riparian areas in the Chihuahuan Desert, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 grassland ecosystem functionality stressor, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas where they work were given a tally for each of the top 3 stressors that participants chose.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 montane ecosystem functionality stressor, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas where they work were given a tally for each of the top 3 stressors that participants chose.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 riparian ecosystem functionality stressor, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas where they work were given a tally for each of the top 3 stressors that participants chose.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 grassland habitat fragmentation and loss stressor, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas where they work were given a tally for each of the top 3 stressors that participants chose.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 riparian habitat fragmentation and loss stressor, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas where they work were given a tally for each of the top 3 stressors that participants chose.

Date posted: January 30, 2020

These heatmaps show a top 3 invasive and problematic plant stressor for montane areas in the Chihuahuan Desert, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor across the landscape. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red.

Date posted: January 30, 2020
Preview image of CCAST_CRAB Meeting_Jan 2020.pdf

The CCAST team had an active fall and early winter with several presentations at local meetings. Click the attachments posted here for two presentations as well as a downloadable poster. Meetings included:

  • Colorado River Aquatic Biologists (CRAB) meeting in Laughlin, Nevada (January 8-9, 2020)
  • Gila River Basin Native Fish Program annual meeting in Cottonwood, Arizona (December 9-11, 2019)
  • Society for Ecological Restoration Southwest Chapter Annual Conference in Tucson, Arizona (November 8-10, 2019)
     
Date posted: January 23, 2020

This item contains groundwater features such as aquifers and brackish groundwater wells within the Dos Rios LCD project area.

Date posted: January 15, 2020

The 2010 North American Land Cover 30-meter dataset was produced as part of the North American Land Change Monitoring System (NALCMS), a trilateral effort between Natural Resources Canada, the United States Geological Survey, and three Mexican organizations including the National Institute of Statistics and Geography (Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía), National Commission for the Knowledge and Use of the Biodiversity (Comisión Nacional Para el Conocimiento y Uso de la Biodiversidad), and the National Forestry Commission of Mexico (Comisión Nacional Forestal).

Date posted: January 15, 2020

These heatmaps were created from responses to an ecosystem stressors ranking exercise from 157 conservation professionals working in the Chihuahuan Desert. The ranking exercise was created by the Borderlands Research Institute at Sul Ross State University, in Alpine, Texas. The exercise was sent to conservation partners within the Chihuahuan Desert region in the winter of 2018 and 2019. Participants were asked to identify counties in the US and municipalities in Mexico where they focus their conservation work.

Date posted: January 15, 2020

This item contains surface water features such as subbasins, major rivers, and streamflow gauges within the Dos Rios LCD project area.

Date posted: January 15, 2020

This dataset features inundated areas connected to the main channel at discharges from 15,000 cfs to 95,000 cfs. The spatial extent for floodplain inundation modeling in the lower Trinity River was from Romayor, Texas, to approximately Moss Bluff, Texas. River sections were modeled using steady flow conditions. For the upper section, discharge and stage were both available for the two gages (Romayor USGS 08066500 and Liberty USGS 08067000). For the lower section, the Moss Bluff gage (USGS 08067100) is tidally-influenced, so gage height didn’t correspond to upstream changes in discharge.

Date posted: December 27, 2019

This dataset features floodplain depth (in meters) at discharges from 15,000 cfs to 100,000 cfs. The spatial extent for floodplain inundation modeling in the lower Trinity River was from Romayor, Texas, to approximately Moss Bluff, Texas. River sections were modeled using steady flow conditions. For the upper section, discharge and stage were both available for the two gages (Romayor USGS 08066500 and Liberty USGS 08067000). For the lower section, the Moss Bluff gage (USGS 08067100) is tidally-influenced, so gage height didn’t correspond to upstream changes in discharge.

Date posted: December 27, 2019

This dataset features suitable habitat at discharges from 15,000 cfs to 100,000 cfs. The spatial extent for floodplain inundation modeling in the lower Trinity River was from Romayor, Texas, to approximately Moss Bluff, Texas. River sections were modeled using steady flow conditions. For the upper section, discharge and stage were both available for the two gages (Romayor USGS 08066500 and Liberty USGS 08067000). For the lower section, the Moss Bluff gage (USGS 08067100) is tidally-influenced, so gage height didn’t correspond to upstream changes in discharge.

Date posted: December 27, 2019

This dataset features inundated areas at discharges from 15,000 cfs to 100,000 cfs. The spatial extent for floodplain inundation modeling in the lower Trinity River was from Romayor, Texas, to approximately Moss Bluff, Texas. River sections were modeled using steady flow conditions. For the upper section, discharge and stage were both available for the two gages (Romayor USGS 08066500 and Liberty USGS 08067000). For the lower section, the Moss Bluff gage (USGS 08067100) is tidally-influenced, so gage height didn’t correspond to upstream changes in discharge.

Date posted: December 27, 2019

This dataset features suitable habitat connected to the main channel (based on floodplain inundation) at discharges from 15,000 cfs to 100,000 cfs. The spatial extent for floodplain inundation modeling in the lower Trinity River was from Romayor, Texas, to approximately Moss Bluff, Texas. River sections were modeled using steady flow conditions. For the upper section, discharge and stage were both available for the two gages (Romayor USGS 08066500 and Liberty USGS 08067000).

Date posted: December 27, 2019

This dataset features suitable habitat connected to the main channel (based on floodplain inundation) within managed areas at discharges from 15,000 cfs to 100,000 cfs. The spatial extent for floodplain inundation modeling in the lower Trinity River was from Romayor, Texas, to approximately Moss Bluff, Texas. River sections were modeled using steady flow conditions. For the upper section, discharge and stage were both available for the two gages (Romayor USGS 08066500 and Liberty USGS 08067000).

Date posted: December 27, 2019

This dataset features suitable depth (0.2 m ≤ depth ≤ 2.0 m) at discharges from 15,000 cfs to 100,000 cfs. The spatial extent for floodplain inundation modeling in the lower Trinity River was from Romayor, Texas, to approximately Moss Bluff, Texas. River sections were modeled using steady flow conditions. For the upper section, discharge and stage were both available for the two gages (Romayor USGS 08066500 and Liberty USGS 08067000). For the lower section, the Moss Bluff gage (USGS 08067100) is tidally-influenced, so gage height didn’t correspond to upstream changes in discharge.

Date posted: December 27, 2019

The spatial products described here rate the ecological integrity of six broadly defined habitats (Table 1-1; Appendix Table A-1). We selected these habitats as conservation targets for the Edwards to Gulf Landscape Conservation Design (LCD) through a participatory process (Tarbox et al. 2018). We then conducted a viability assessment of each habitat by identifying their key ecological attributes (KEAs), and appropriate indicators. We assessed the status of KEAs to determine the ecological integrity of each habitat type (FOS 2013).

Date posted: October 9, 2019

The Edwards to Gulf Conservation Blueprint represents a participatory effort to develop a suite of decision support tools that facilitate cooperation between conservation partners in the region. The blueprint was created in a transparent and iterative process, building upon a previously existing coarse filter blueprint to generate a fine filter by increasing the spatial resolution, and number and variety of indicators used.

Date posted: October 9, 2019