Projects By Product: Website

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives use a collaborative approach to identify landscape scale conservation solutions. LCCs work across jurisdictional and political boundaries to work with partners to: meet unfilled conservation needs, develop decision support tools, share data and knowledge, and facilitate and foster partnerships.

As part of a shared science strategy, LCCs coordinate closely with the National Climate Change and Wildlife Center and the eight regional Climate Science Centers.

Increased network capacity is a priority identified by the GNLCC and the RMPF Leadership Team to build on the organizational structure of LCC Partner Forums.

This project researched the expected variation in avian demographic responses to environmental change across a gradient of species and landscapes from the San Francisco Bay to the Central Valley of California.

The Climate Science Alliance - South Coast is a partnership formed to develop and support a network of conservation leaders, scientists, and natural resource managers focused on sharing ecosystem-based resiliency approaches to safeguard our communities and natural resources from climate change ri

In its first funded year this project created an online environment in which land managers and their technical support staff can quickly find the climate adaptation information they need and communicate with the researchers producing the data.

A century of fire exclusion across many forest types in the western U.S. has resulted in unforeseen changes, including high fuel accumulations, high densities of trees, and increasing dominance of fire-intolerant species.

Gulf Coast Prairie Landscape Conservation Cooperative partners are undertaking numerous efforts to conserve and restore coastal resources, many of which are sensitive to the effects of climate change.

This project will implement climate-smart restoration planning and practices for forest landscapes in the Rogue Basin.

The Cascadia Parner Forum fosters a network of natural resource practitioners working with the NPLCC and GNLCC to guild the adaptive capacity of the landscape and species living within it.

Ferguson Lynch is contracted through Wildlife Management Institute for the creation, IT support and ongoing maintenance of a website for the North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative, including web portal and cloud services.

In response to the threats of land use and changing environmental conditions, the North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) and the Northeast Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (NEAFWA) coordinated a team of partners from 13 states, the U.S.

This agreement supported the Regional Conservation Opportunity Areas project, later renamed "Nature's Network," of the North Atlantic LCC partnership.

Research on coastal change in Cook Inlet and South East Alaska has increased rapidly in recent years, making it challenging to track existing projects, understand their cumulative insights, gauge remaining research gaps, and prioritize future work.

Research on coastal change in Cook Inlet and South East Alaska has increased rapidly in recent years, making it challenging to track existing projects, understand their cumulative insights, gauge remaining research gaps, and prioritize future work.

The Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GNLCC) is sponsoring the Sage Steppe Partner Forum to help facilitate collaboration among conservation practitioners and partnerships that share landscape conservation challenges in an eco-geographic context.

For the past six years, the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) has funded the USGS to study fish responses to restoration efforts and to construct a model relating stream habitat with fish population dynamics in the Methow River Basin, a tributary of the Columbia River.

Assemble three sets of downscaled climate data (historic) and projections (future) developed by the USGS and the Climate Impacts Group at University of Washington; evaluate data documentation and formatting, and edit or repair as needed; deliver all climate data in a userfriendly format from mirr

The Washington Connected Landscapes Project will provide a framework to address the interacting impacts of habitat fragmentation and climate change on ecological systems and wildlife species within the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GNLCC) boundary.

We propose a collaborative project with the USGS, Wyoming State Climate Office, USFWS, USFS, and the NPS whereby we will assemble and maintain long-term records of climate from key stations in and around the Great Northern LCC and subject these records to a rigorous series of QA/QC procedures.

This project is part of an ongoing effort to develop and implement a landscape level decision support system (DSS) across the boundaries of Idaho, Washington, Oregon, and Montana.

Funding supports a multiyear initiative entitled Crown of the Continent Landscapes Analysis/Ecological Indicators Project.

In conservation, one challenge of climate change adaptation is that acting on projected long-term climatic threats requires two ‘leaps’ by managers: 1) Acting on climate-based inf

This project will result in development of an information management and delivery system to coordinate science communication platforms and to build a catalog inside of the USGS ScienceBase data and information management platform.

The North Pacific Forest Landscape Corridor and Connectivity Project utilized a landscape connectivity simulator (UNICOR) and a genetic simulation program (CDPOP) to model the functional (dispersal and genetic) connectivity in the North Pacific Landscape.

The Cascadia Parner Forum fosters a network of natural resource practitioners working with the NPLCC and GNLCC to guild the adaptive capacity of the landscape and species living within it.

A "gateway" using Data Basin technology has been developed to serve the data integration, collaboration and outreach needs of the NPLCC.

This project aims to support dry forest and savannah habitats in The Georgia Basin. Management objectives are to synthesize existing data into GIS tools that will prioritize land acquisition and conservation investment.

The Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GLNCC) has convened the Columbia Basin Partner Forum (CBPF) to help facilitate collaboration among conservation practitioners and partnerships that share landscape conservation challenges in an eco-geographic context.

Proposed work will monitor for five years vegetation, fuels, wildlife, insects, and weather at 10 Sagebrush Steppe Treatment Evaluation Project (SageSTEP) sites, all of which have been treated to reduce either juniper encroachment (woodland sites) or cheatgrass invasion (sagebrush/cheatgrass site

We propose to work with the Rocky Mountain Partnership Forum to expand upon the successful approach applied in the first two years of this project to help managers incorporate climate change science into their natural resource management decisions for a new resource of interest that will be chose

Defenders staff, contractors and Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative partners will build a portal on the Conservation Registry to visualize landscape scale plans and conservation projects that address the priorities of the program.

Grassland-shrubland prairie has been important to the livelihoods of generations of ranchers; to the hunting community because of prized game species; and to endangered species, such as the black-capped vireo, as habitat.

The Gulf Coastal Plains and Ozarks Landscape Conservation Cooperative Geomatics Working Group developed an on-line platform to serve geospatial data in a consistent manner that also allows end-users to easily discover, access, and integrate existing data and tools without dedicated GIS software o

Rocky Mountain Research Station scientists initiated a study in the 1990s on avian distribution and habitat associations within the Sky Islands.

This case study project is on the Upper Pajaro River, which crosses a 9,000-acre natural floodplain in the Central Coast.

This project developed a foundation for monitoring environmental change by identifying where and what to monitor in order to evaluate climate-change impacts.

This project used species distribution modeling, population genetics, and geospatial analysis of historical vs. modern vertebrate populations to identify climate change refugia and population connectivity across the Sierra Nevada.