Projects By Category: Monitoring

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives use a collaborative approach to identify landscape-scale conservation solutions. LCCs work across jurisdictional and political boundaries to work with partners to: meet unfilled conservation needs, develop decision support tools, share data and knowledge and facilitate and foster partnerships.

As part of a shared science strategy, LCCs coordinate closely with the National Climate Change and Wildlife Center and the eight regional Climate Science Centers as well as Migratory Bird Joint Ventures and National Fish Habitat Partnerships across North America.

  • South Atlantic

Managers and scientists are working together in a new project to understand and optimally manage conservation lands along the Atlanta and Mississippi Flyways to support continental populations of waterbirds.

  • South Atlantic

This project is intended to increase the utility of the International Shorebird Survey (ISS) for making shorebird management and conservation decisions within the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative.

  • Great Basin

FY2015This effort complements a project, supported by the Joint Fire Science Program, to explore relations among cheatgrass-driven fire, climate, and sensitive-status birds across the Great Basin.

  • Great Basin

FY2016Develop and utilize both correlative and experimental approaches to evaluate effects of different intensities of spring cattle grazing on sage-grouse habitat selection, insect abundance, and sage-grouse demographic and behavioral traits.

  • Great Basin

FY2015Collaborators are investigating the effect of low rise dams water supply, ecosystem functions and health, and habitat for a wide range of organisms, including sage grouse.

  • Great Basin

FY2014This project builds upon the springs and seeps inventory funded by the Desert LCC.

This project will:

  • Great Basin

FY2016Monitor the diversity and abundance of winged insects (including Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, and Hemiptera), which include many key insect pollinators, using an array of passive and active trapping methods.

  • Great Basin

FY2014The purpose of this project is to develop a series of high resolution (1:24,000 scale) digital wetland maps and associated data to support conservation planning in Nevada.

  • Great Basin

FY2017Removal of livestock grazing is a common prescription to promote ecosystem recovery after wildfire (and subsequent emergency site rehabilitation efforts).

  • Great Basin

FY2011Aspen populations are in decline across western North America due to altered fire regimes, herbivory, drought, pathogens, and competition with conifers.

  • Great Basin

FY2013“The loss of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.) on sites disturbed by fire has motivated many restoration seeding and planting efforts. However, the resulting sagebrush establishment is often lower than desired, especially in dry areas.

  • Great Basin

FY2017The Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy Actionable Science Plan places a high priority on assessing control measures for invasive annual grasses, which provide fuel for rangeland fire and impede restoration of desirable perennials.

  • Great Basin

FY2017Increasing effectiveness of post-fire treatments is a management priority, such as is emphasized in Secretarial Order #3336 on rangeland fire and restoration, which prescribes a programmatic, longer-term approach that accommodates the layering of different treatments in sagebrush-steppe ran

  • Great Basin

FY2015This project assesses the efficacy of ACK55, a naturally occurring bacterium that decreases invasive annual grasses by up to 70% on test sites.

  • Great Basin

FY2014The project team surveyed land managers working on invasive weeds in the west. These surveys provided information for the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife (WAFWA) Wildfire and Invasive Species Initiative Working Group.

  • Great Basin

FY2015Study the wildlife impacts of the Bruneau-Owyhee Sage-grouse Habitat (BOSH) project.

  • North Pacific

This project, with funding support by the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative andpartners, will address the need to better understand the impact that climate change will have on oursalmon subsistence resources in southeast Alaska.

  • North Pacific

The Tongass National Forest has identified resources that are important to stakeholders and vulnerable to climate-related stressors. Cooperators will review an action plan and convene a workshop to be held in Southeast Alaska in 2016.

  • North Pacific

The Tongass National Forest has identified resources that are important to stakeholders and vulnerable to climate-related stressors. Cooperators will review an action plan and convene a workshop to be held in Southeast Alaska in 2016.

  • Great Northern

The bull trout is an ESA-listed species that relies on cold stream environments across the Northwest and is expected to decline with climate change.

  • Great Northern

As the impacts of climate change amplify, understanding the consequences for wetland dynamics will be critical for their sustainable management and conservation, particularly in arid regions such as the CP ecoregion.

  • Great Northern

This project is intended to advance wolverine conservation across the Rocky Mountains and North Cascades in the contiguous United States.

  • Great Northern

In May 2014, the GNLCC Steering Committee approved two pilot projects explore approaches to landscape-scale coordination to enhance science-based management across the GNLCC.

  • Great Northern

We propose an international partnership to facilitate the identification of habitat connectivity conservation opportunities and implementation of connectivity projects in the transboundary area of Washington and British Columbia.

  • Pacific Islands

Summary  Conduct an objective assessment of the existing programs monitoring climate-sensitive ecological variables (biological and geophysical) in the terrestrial Hawaiian environment, generate a summary for consideration at an expert workshop, participate in the workshop, and summarize the cons

  • Plains and Prairie Potholes

    Numerous studies have documented the effects of landscape disturbance, including that associated with energy development, on increased abundance of invasive and non-native species.

  • Plains and Prairie Potholes

     Native grasslands have been reduced to a fraction of their original extent, with estimated total loss prior to the 1990s of 70% for prairie grassland (Federal Provincial and Territorial Governments of Canada 2010).

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

The decline in the monarch butterfly has led to it being considered for listing under the Endangered Species Act.

  • Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers

The goal of the project is to determine biodiversity impacts of land restoration associated with clean and renewable energy development; specifically, natural gas production through anaerobic digestion of hog manure and native plant material, as being forwarded by Roeslein Alternative Energy (RAE

  • Great Plains

Quantitative studies focusing on the collection of semibuoyant fish eggs, which are associated with a pelagic broadcast-spawning reproductive strategy, are often conducted to evaluate reproductive success.

  • Desert

The Desert LCC will provide the 50% of the Federal component of funds, and the work designed will support the science objectives for the Desert LCC and its partners as well as provide needed improvements to the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) in the Lower Colorado River Region, and beyond.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

Habitat loss and degradation due to urban expansion and other human activities have raised concerns for the Western Gulf Coast Mottled Duck population. This species relies on tidal, palustrine, and agricultural wetlands as well as grasslands for all of its life cycle needs.

  • Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers

Monarch butterfly and other pollinators are in trouble. Monarch butterfly habitat— including milkweed host plants and nectar food sources—has declined drastically throughout most of the United States.

  • Western Alaska

Storm tides can influence salinity concentrations of ponds on Kigigak Island, which can affect the breeding population of Spectacled Eider found there. This project will expand instrumentation currently collecting data related to pond water levels and salinities, and tidal dynamics.

  • Western Alaska

This project will develop an Implementation Strategy for a voluntary participation water temperature monitoring network in Bristol Bay, expand the annual Water Quality/QAPP Recertification training for local monitors and initiate temperature monitoring in select drainages.

  • Western Alaska

This project will produce a coordinated strategy for collaborative acquisition of time-series water temperature data for the Kodiak Archipelago to facilitate understanding and prediction of salmon-habitat interactions.

  • Western Alaska

This project establishes a permafrost observation network at the continuous/discontinuous permafrost boundary of the Western Alaska LCC.

  • Western Alaska

The lake and lagoon surface temperature trends and projections that result from this project will fill a fundamental data gap in western Alaska and will be valuable to scientists and land managers for climate change studies, habitat evaluations, and land and resource management decision making.

  • Western Alaska

Water temperature monitoring can provide early warning signs of climate change effects. The products from this project will provide a framework for better understanding trend in the quality of lake environments in relation to climate change.

  • Western Alaska

Many areas of western Alaska lack snowpack and snow condition data, including the prime winter range for the Western Arctic Caribou Herd.

  • Western Alaska

This project will support data collection in the Bering Sea from a Triaxys oceanographic wave buoy to supplement existing stationary sensors.

  • Pacific Islands

HaleNet, the climate network on Haleakalā, Maui, is unique in Hawai‘i for its coverage of highly diverse environments, range different climate variables monitored, high temporal resolution, and longterm record.

  • Pacific Islands

In the tropics, ample freshwater is the primary resource supporting thriving human and ecological communities. In the Pacific Islands, many watersheds are threatened by climate change, urban encroachment, and invasion by water-demanding exotic plant species like strawberry guava (SG).

  • Pacific Islands

Traditional Ecological Knowledge, or TEK, is “a cumulative body of knowledge, practice and belief, evolving by adaptive processes and handed down through generations by cultural transmission, about the relationships of living beings (including humans) with one another and with their environments.

  • Plains and Prairie Potholes

This project has three objectives: (1) evaluate the abilitiy of dual acoustic-ultrasonic recorders to capture nocturnal calls of birds and bats at wind power sites; (2) relate nocturnal calls to results of facility searches at operational wind farms: (3) evaluate whether call activitiy varies in

  • North Pacific

In-person workshops will be conducted to bring the results from the USGS Program on Coastal Ecosystems Response to Climate Change's study on projected climate change effects on coastal environments (funded by NPLCC and NW CSC) to managers in their communities.

The LCC Performance Measures Project is intended to: Follow the direction of the LCC Performance Measures Working Group; Assess the needs of individual LCCs specific to Performance Measures (PM); Assess the needs of the LCC network specific to PM; Review PM frameworks from natural resource and so

The goal of this project is to develop a detailed national sampling frame for bat monitoring at various spatial scales similar to the recently designed Amphibian and Reptile Monitoring Initiative, which will allow biologists and managers to assess the status of North American bats.

  • Great Northern

The Canadian portion of the Crown of the Continent (CCoC) ecosystem has been identified as crucial for wolverines north of the US border to 'rescue' or supply individuals and genes through dispersal to the highly fragmented population in the northern US Rocky Mountains.

  • Great Northern

This project will focus on analysis of 10 years of GPS telemetry data for 60 grizzly bears across the threatened and fragmented trans-border grizzly bear subpopulations in the Cabinet, Yaak, Purcell, and Selkirk Mountain (Proctor et al.