Projects By Category: Conservation Planning

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives use a collaborative approach to identify landscape-scale conservation solutions. LCCs work across jurisdictional and political boundaries to work with partners to: meet unfilled conservation needs, develop decision support tools, share data and knowledge and facilitate and foster partnerships.

As part of a shared science strategy, LCCs coordinate closely with the National Climate Change and Wildlife Center and the eight regional Climate Science Centers as well as Migratory Bird Joint Ventures and National Fish Habitat Partnerships across North America.

  • South Atlantic

The objective is to create a hydrologic foundation for detailed assessment of human and climate impacts on stream and river flows, including the impacts of hydrologic alterations on aquatic habitats.

  • Great Basin

FY2015This effort complements a project, supported by the Joint Fire Science Program, to explore relations among cheatgrass-driven fire, climate, and sensitive-status birds across the Great Basin.

  • Great Basin

FY2015The Northwestern Great Basin ecoregion is one of the most intact ecosystems in the west. It is also a biological hotspot for migratory birds, greater sage-grouse and a stronghold for pronghorn antelope.

  • Great Basin

Project to provide information to support the GBLCC’s implementation of a new project tracking system.

  • Great Basin

FY2014Recent drought, change agents and the spectrum of greater management needs have highlighted the relative dearth of in situ weather and climate measurement stations in the Great Basin. Thus, interest has grown in supplementing or initiating atmospheric and hydrologic measurements.

  • Great Basin

FY2016This project will address limited tribal capacity for vulnerability assessment by providing guidance and data tailored to the needs and capacities of Northwest and Great Basin tribes. Specifically, the project will:

  • Great Basin

FY2016This project will evaluate the effects of vegetation treatments on population connectivity, genetic diversity and gene flow of wildlife species across the full extent of the Great Basin LCC.

  • Great Basin

FY2015Collaborators are investigating the effect of low rise dams water supply, ecosystem functions and health, and habitat for a wide range of organisms, including sage grouse.

  • Great Basin

FY2015The Great Basin Region, which covers much of Nevada, and portions of California, Oregon, Idaho, and Utah, managers are already confronting a changing climate and are beginning to make management decisions despite uncertainty in how climate change effects will manifest in the region.

  • Great Basin

FY2015The Great Basin Region, which covers much of Nevada, and portions of California, Oregon, Idaho, and Utah, managers are already confronting a changing climate and are beginning to make management decisions despite uncertainty in how climate change effects will manifest in the region.

  • Great Basin

FY2015Persistent ecosystem and anthropogenic disturbances and stressors are threatening sustainability of sagebrush ecosystems in the western US, and managers and policy makers are seeking strategic, holistic approaches for species conservation and ecosystem restoration.

  • Great Basin

FY2016Planning scenarios will allow the GBLCC to develop a scenario planning document to visualize multidimensional scenarios. By using a participatory modeling process, the scenarios produced are managementrelevant and will have buyin from all major stakeholders.

  • Great Basin

FY2017Increasing effectiveness of post-fire treatments is a management priority, such as is emphasized in Secretarial Order #3336 on rangeland fire and restoration, which prescribes a programmatic, longer-term approach that accommodates the layering of different treatments in sagebrush-steppe ran

  • Great Basin

FY2014Workshops that provide tribal representatives with an introduction to planning for climate change impacts.

  • Great Basin

FY2014The project team surveyed land managers working on invasive weeds in the west. These surveys provided information for the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife (WAFWA) Wildfire and Invasive Species Initiative Working Group.

  • Great Basin

FY2015Study the wildlife impacts of the Bruneau-Owyhee Sage-grouse Habitat (BOSH) project.

  • North Pacific

The Alaska Coastal Rainforest Center (ACRC) lead a second workshop to develop cross-boundary geospatial and climate data sets in support of regional conservation applications in the coastal temperate rainforest zone of Southeast Alaska and British Columbia.

  • North Pacific

The North Pacific LCC helped sponsor the Second Annual Pacific Northwest Climate Science Conference. This two day, regional conference included a panel discussion on federal climate science endeavors in the Pacific NW.

  • North Pacific

The Services goal with this project is to bridge the gap between guidance documents and field staff who develop Habitat Conservation Plans (HCPs).

  • North Pacific

WDFW will use funds provided by the NPLCC to integrate climate change impacts and implications into our State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) Revision.

  • North Pacific

WDFW will use funds provided by the NPLCC to integrate climate change impacts and implications into our State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) Revision.

  • North Pacific

Research on coastal change in Cook Inlet and South East Alaska has increased rapidly in recent years, making it challenging to track existing projects, understand their cumulative insights, gauge remaining research gaps, and prioritize future work.

  • North Pacific

Research on coastal change in Cook Inlet and South East Alaska has increased rapidly in recent years, making it challenging to track existing projects, understand their cumulative insights, gauge remaining research gaps, and prioritize future work.

  • North Pacific

The Lower Columbia River and adjacent coastal regions of Oregon and Washington contain a rich diversity of natural and cultural resources managed by a complex array of tribal sovereign nations, federal/state/local agencies, non-government conservation organizations, landowners, stakeholders and o

  • North Pacific

The Tongass National Forest has identified resources that are important to stakeholders and vulnerable to climate-related stressors. Cooperators will review an action plan and convene a workshop to be held in Southeast Alaska in 2016.

  • North Pacific

The Tongass National Forest has identified resources that are important to stakeholders and vulnerable to climate-related stressors. Cooperators will review an action plan and convene a workshop to be held in Southeast Alaska in 2016.

  • North Pacific

The Humboldt Bay-Eel River region may experience the highest rate of relative sea level rise increase along the West Coast. The Project will engage stakeholders to discuss community and science needs for planning and implementing adaptation measures to sea level rise.

  • North Pacific

The Humboldt Bay-Eel River region may experience the highest rate of relative sea level rise increase along the West Coast. The Project will engage stakeholders to discuss community and science needs for planning and implementing adaptation measures to sea level rise.

  • North Pacific

WildLinks 2012 brought together transboundary scientists and managers to build on transboundary discussions started during Wildlinks 2010 and 2011 related to climate adaptation for species and habitats on both sides of the border.

  • North Atlantic

This project completed a rapid update for wetland mapping in 162 coastal areas (1:24,000 topographic quadrangles in ME, MD, MA, NJ, NY, PA, and VA) that were last updated prior to 2000.

  • Great Northern

In May 2014, the GNLCC Steering Committee approved two pilot projects explore approaches to landscape-scale coordination to enhance science-based management across the GNLCC.

  • Great Northern

The Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GNLCC) is sponsoring the Sage Steppe Partner Forum to help facilitate collaboration among conservation practitioners and partnerships that share landscape conservation challenges in an eco-geographic context.

  • Great Northern

The White House Council for Environmental Quality has identified two national watersheds to pilot large-scale drought resiliency implementation.

  • Great Northern

Existing climate change science and guidance for restoring and maintaining whitebark pine forests will be evaluated using landscape simulation modeling to inform implementation of the Greater Yellowstone Coordinating Committee (GYCC) Whitebark Pine (WBP) subcommittees WBP Strategy.

  • Great Northern

Funding supports a multiyear initiative entitled Crown of the Continent Landscapes Analysis/Ecological Indicators Project.

  • Great Northern

Native fish of the Columbia River Basin, and the ecosystems that support them, are an innate and critical part of Nez Perce culture.

  • Pacific Islands

Develop an island-wide mangrove adaption and management plan that will incorporate the findings from the comprehensive island-wide mangrove vulnerability assessment that is currently being funded through awards to MCT from the United States DOI Office of Insular Affairs and Fish and Wildlife Serv

  • North Atlantic

With support from the North Atlantic LCC and Hurricane Sandy Disaster Mitigation funds the North Atlantic Aquatic Connectivity Collaborative (www.streamcontinuity.org) has developed a regional crossing assessment protocol and database, scoring systems

  • North Atlantic

The North Atlantic Region of the United States and Canada boasts diverse habitats, from coasts to mountains, that support endemic and rare plant species. However, recent conservation actions and prioritization efforts in this region have neglected to include plants.

  • North Atlantic

Climate change threatens to alter the ecology of coasts in the Northeastern US: it disrupts processes, enhances disturbance, rearranges or destroys habitat, and creates novel conditions for the fish and wildlife that inhabit the coastal zone.

  • North Atlantic

The North Atlantic LCC and the University of Massachusetts Landscape Ecology Lab have a cooperative agreement under the Hurricane Sandy Disaster Mitigation Fund entitled Designing Sustainable Coastal Landscapes in the Face of Sea-level Rise and Storms.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

We propose to empirically characterize hydrology/fish-production relationships for different ecological groups of fishes living in the Red River and associated reservoir habitats by: 1. Correlating historic hydrologic data with catch curve residuals, and 2.

  • Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers

The Upper Midwest and Great Lakes (UMGL) and the Eastern Tallgrass Prairie & Big Rivers (ETP) Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) are convening State Wildlife Action Plan Coordinators in the Midwest states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, and Wisconsin t

  • South Atlantic

The proposed project focuses upon two major goals:
1. Designate Priority Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Areas (PARCAs) in the South Atlantic Landscape, and develop an adaptive management plan for those areas.

  • South Atlantic

In 2012, the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (SALCC) began development of its process to select natural resource indicators and targets as specific landscape scale measures of success for natural resources.

  • South Atlantic

The South Atlantic LCC is seeking technical assistance in the testing process for their newly chosen terrestrial natural resource indicators (http://www.southatlanticlcc.org/indicators).

  • South Atlantic

Goals: The Project Partners will work to improve the connection between restricted range and at-risk species conservation and the South Atlantic Conservation Blueprint.

  • Plains and Prairie Potholes

We connect science and people. This July 9 - 10, 2014, the LCC will host its second Connections Workshop in Billings, Montana, to promote continued collaboration between scientists, managers, communicators and policy experts.

  • Plains and Prairie Potholes

The invasion of native communities by cool-season introduced grasses, especially smooth brome and Kentucky bluegrass in upland prairies and reed canary grass in wetlands, is an important management issue on federally-owned lands.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

Submersed aquatic vegetation, a critical component of highly productive coastal ecosystems, is greatly affected by sea level rise.