Projects By Category: Decision Support

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives use a collaborative approach to identify landscape-scale conservation solutions. LCCs work across jurisdictional and political boundaries to work with partners to: meet unfilled conservation needs, develop decision support tools, share data and knowledge and facilitate and foster partnerships.

As part of a shared science strategy, LCCs coordinate closely with the National Climate Change and Wildlife Center and the eight regional Climate Science Centers as well as Migratory Bird Joint Ventures and National Fish Habitat Partnerships across North America.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie LCC

The RESTORE Act (33 U.S. Code § 1321) directs 80% of Clean Water Act penalties from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (likely to be in the billions) to Gulf of Mexico restoration.

  • Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers LCC

How did this multi-LCC initiative develop?

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes LCC

Researchers downscaled projections of maximum and minimum temperature and precipitation across a large extent east of the Rocky Mountains to the Atlantic Coast.  The data is probabilistic in nature, providing flexibility in incorporating climate information into impact assessments.  Statistical t

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes LCC

    As a major threat to global biodiversity, climate change will alter where and how we manage conservation lands (e.g., parks, refuges, wildlife management areas, natural areas).

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes LCC

Capacity to prioritize barrier removals in the Great Lakes basin is currently limited by lack of data on the passability of road crossings and dams for both unwanted invasive species and desirable native migratory fishes.

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes LCC

An experienced team of wetland ecologists, geographers, and software engineers propose to use the geodesign process (Goodchild 2010, Steinitz 2012) to develop and host a web-based geospatial application that will support the identification and restoration of potential coastal wetlands (i.e., area

  • Gulf Coast Prairie LCC

Habitat loss and degradation due to urban expansion and other human activities have raised concerns for the Western Gulf Coast Mottled Duck population. This species relies on tidal, palustrine, and agricultural wetlands as well as grasslands for all of its life cycle needs.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie LCC

Alligator Gar, Atractosteus spatula, is an iconic species native to lowland floodplain river systems where they play an important role as top predators and by linking landscapes through their movement. Alligator Gar is also an important native fisheries species in the Trinity River.

  • Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers LCC

This multi-LCC project is designed to evaluate delivery of existing courses offered through the National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) as “pilots” to enhance expertise needed within the regional context of LCC and Climate Science Center (CSC) communities.

  • Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers LCC

The multi-LCC Mississippi River Basin/Gulf Hypoxia Initiative is a joint effort to find the nexus of water quality, wildlife, and people in the Mississippi River Basin.

  • Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers LCC

The best hope for recovering and maintaining ecosystem function and services for the tallgrass prairie ecosystem is reconstruction.

  • Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers LCC

Monarch butterfly and other pollinators are in trouble. Monarch butterfly habitat— including milkweed host plants and nectar food sources—has declined drastically throughout most of the United States.

  • Western Alaska LCC

To evaluate the potential impacts of changes on waterbird habitat due to climate change, this project examines historic responses of water birds to storm surges on the Y-K Delta by examining waterbird distribution and breeding parameters before and after coastal storm surges between 1985 and 2012

  • Western Alaska LCC

Extensive mapping of coastal change will provide important baseline information on the distribution and magnitude of landscape changes over the past 41 years. With this analysis, changes can be summarized for different land ownership or other units to assess the extent of recent habitat loss.

  • Western Alaska LCC

The primary goal of this project is to facilitate the completion of ShoreZone mapping of biophysical resources of the coastal supratidal, intertidal, and subtidal areas in the southern Alaska Peninsula, and to make this mapping data web accessible and available to all who request the data.

  • Western Alaska LCC

This project will develop a searchable geospatial database for stream and lake water temperature monitoring activities in Alaska.

  • Western Alaska LCC

Multi-LCC project, funded by the National LCC Network. This project establishes a statewide framework to improve the hydrography mapping and stewardship in Alaska through the creation of a statewide system to make digital mapping data updates accessible and affordable.

  • Western Alaska LCC

This project will develop an Implementation Strategy for a voluntary participation water temperature monitoring network in Bristol Bay, expand the annual Water Quality/QAPP Recertification training for local monitors and initiate temperature monitoring in select drainages.

  • Western Alaska LCC

This project will produce a coordinated strategy for collaborative acquisition of time-series water temperature data for the Kodiak Archipelago to facilitate understanding and prediction of salmon-habitat interactions.

  • Western Alaska LCC

This project supports the technical development of a mobile application for identifying and reporting invasive plant species in Alaska. The app will be available for both Android and iOS operating systems.

  • Western Alaska LCC

This project supports the development of a key for identifying non-natives plant species, which will be incorporated into a mobile application for identifying and reporting invasive plant species in Alaska.

  • Western Alaska LCC

The goal of this project is to develop a statewide water temperature network with easily understood and readily implemented data standards to support landscape-level assessments.

  • Western Alaska LCC

This project will identify existing coastal change projects in Western Alaska and synthesize information about each project. The resulting report will document the project landscape for communities, researchers, resource managers, and funding agencies.

  • Western Alaska LCC

This project investigates the variability in size and annual growth of juvenile Chinook across western Alaska, the association of juvenile Chinook size or annual growth with stream temperature gradients, and whether expected water temperature changes will affect juvenile Chinook habitat suitabili

  • Western Alaska LCC

This project will compile and analyze existing stream, river and lake temperatures data in SW Alaska, and will result in refinement of the monitoring plan developed to characterize thermal responses to ongoing climate change in the region.

  • Western Alaska LCC

By combining analyses of data from two large lake systems in the Kvichak watershed, laboratory rearing experiments to elucidate functional relationships, and simulation modeling, this project quantifies biological responses to changing freshwater temperature in sockeye salmon in western Alaska.

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes LCC

Ecological connectivity between the Great Lakes and their tributaries is widely impaired, and many agencies and organizations are currently investing in restoring these connections to enhance target fish and wildlife populations.

  • Western Alaska LCC

This project will use existing ShoreZone coastal imagery to map 719 km of shoreline in Bristol Bay, from Cape Constantine to Cape Newenham. This section of coastline is an extremely important herring spawning area and an important component of the Bristol Bay fisheries

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes LCC

This scenario planning decision support tool for the Kankakee River basin as a first case study/proof-of concept.

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes LCC

Great Lakes coastal wetlands provide critical habitat for many species of birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians, and provide essential spawning and nursery habitat for many fish species of ecologic and economic importance.

  • Western Alaska LCC

This project establishes a permafrost observation network at the continuous/discontinuous permafrost boundary of the Western Alaska LCC.

  • Western Alaska LCC

This project focuses on permafrost change and its effect on lake habitat in Western Alaska. Resource managers and local communities need spatially explicit information to determine past lake habitat changes, identify spatial patterns correlated to climate, and project future habitat changes.

  • Western Alaska LCC

Water temperature monitoring can provide early warning signs of climate change effects. The products from this project will provide a framework for better understanding trend in the quality of lake environments in relation to climate change.

  • Western Alaska LCC

This project will provide an understanding of how precipitation patterns interact with watershed topography to control stream water sources and thermal regimes.

  • Western Alaska LCC

Mid-winter icing events have the potential to lead to population declines of caribou due to restricted access to forage.

  • Western Alaska LCC

This project will produce an existing land cover/dominate specie(s) map at 30m resolution for the entire Western Alaska LCC region.

  • Western Alaska LCC

This project evaluates the connections between climate change impacts and health in 3 Bristol Bay communities: Nondalton, a lake community, Levelock, a river community, and Pilot Point, a coastal community.

  • Western Alaska LCC

This project will quantify the effect that the reduction of nearshore ice coverage has on coastal flooding by developing a model accounting for sea ice, tide, wind-driven wave dynamics and currents on storm surges along the Western Alaska coast.

  • Western Alaska LCC

This project will expand an existing fine-scale storm surge model for the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta. Results will be used to examine the relationship between storm floods and temporal changes in waterbird abundance and nesting locations.

  • Western Alaska LCC

This project will support data collection in the Bering Sea from a Triaxys oceanographic wave buoy to supplement existing stationary sensors.

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes LCC

Climate change is expected to alter the distributions and community composition of stream fishes in the Great Lakes region in the 21st century, in part as a result of altered hydrological systems (stream temperature, streamflow, and habitat).

  • Western Alaska LCC

Nearshore bathymetry is a vital link that joins offshore water depths to coastal topography.

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes LCC

The Nature Conservancy - Great Lakes Program is leading the development of a scalable (Great Lakes wide, individual lake basin, to coastal reach within a lake basin) rule-based spatial model for ranking the relative importance of coastal lands and waters as habitat form migrating birds.

  • Western Alaska LCC

This project will result in a complete, mean high water, digital shoreline for coastal Western Alaska stretching from Cape Prince of Wales to Cape Espenberg.

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes LCC

This project analyzies projected changes in the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events across the Great Lakes region, namely heat waves, cold spells, heavy precipitation events, and droughts, using a statistically downscaled climate product produced by the Climate Working Group of the

  • Western Alaska LCC

This project will use ShoreZone imagery collected as part of another partnership effort to map nearly 1,600 km of coastline between Wales and Kotzebue, completing the Kotzebue Sound shoreline for inclusion in the state-wide ShoreZone dataset.

  • South Atlantic LCC

We propose to support the revision and implementation of the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative’s Conservation Blueprint by integrating its Ecosystem Indicators into a structured decision support system that makes explicit how the Indicators are interrelated and how these will resp

  • Peninsular Florida LCC

Identifying landowner tools for conservation beyond just easements and fee simple purchse as well as defining conservation delivery networks.

  • Pacific Islands LCC

Project will identify exposure of coastal native ecosystems by mapping potential impacts, thus allowing for an assessment of ecosystem vulnerability.

  • Pacific Islands LCC

Hawaii currently lacks management decision-support tools that integrate climate and invasive species effects on ecosystem services such as watershed function and native species health.