Projects By Product: Applications and Tools

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives use a collaborative approach to identify landscape scale conservation solutions. LCCs work across jurisdictional and political boundaries to work with partners to: meet unfilled conservation needs, develop decision support tools, share data and knowledge, and facilitate and foster partnerships.

As part of a shared science strategy, LCCs coordinate closely with the National Climate Change and Wildlife Center and the eight regional Climate Science Centers.

Across the Tennessee River Basin is a collaboration within the Appalachian LCC bringing together multiple agencies and stakeholders in a joint effort to plan and deliver landscape conservation actions to protect one of the most diverse areas for aquatic species in North America.

Assessing Future Energy Development across the Appalachian LCC used models that combined data on energy development trends and identified where these may intersect with important natural resource and ecosystem services to give a more comprehensive picture of what potential energy development coul

Given the rapid environmental change experienced and expected across the Appalachians, it will be crucial to understand the vulnerabilities of valued ecosystem services to drivers of large-scale change that may threaten their sustainability.

The Conservation Efforts Database is a joint effort by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Services and U.S. Geological Survey to collect data on federally listed candidate, threatened, and endangered species.

This project will build on a nascent Landscape Connectivity Network facilitated by Pepperwood and comprised of land trusts, parks and open space districts, with state and federal land managers.

This project will build on a nascent Landscape Connectivity Network facilitated by Pepperwood and comprised of land trusts, parks and open space districts, with state and federal land managers.

This project researched the expected variation in avian demographic responses to environmental change across a gradient of species and landscapes from the San Francisco Bay to the Central Valley of California.

While meadows cover less than one percent of the Sierra Nevada, these ecosystems are of high ecological importance given their role in carbon and nitrogen storage, mediation of surface water flows, groundwater recharge, sediment filtration, and as refugia for numerous species.

Phases 1-3 (2010-2012): This project developed landscape change scenarios based upon water availability and precipitation and temperature patterns projected from downscaled models and investigated impacts of these changes on habitats and ecology of waterfowl, shorebirds, and other waterbirds in t

In its first funded year this project created an online environment in which land managers and their technical support staff can quickly find the climate adaptation information they need and communicate with the researchers producing the data.

This project used the NatureServe Climate Change Vulnerability Index tool to assess vulnerability of 140 bird species that breed in the Sierra Nevada and will develop a peer-reviewed Climate Change Adaptation Strategy for Sierra Nevada bird species that are most vulnerable to climate change.

Gulf Coast Prairie Landscape Conservation Cooperative partners need new computer models to help address threats to grassland habitats, such as land conversion and habitat fragmentation, affecting LCC focal species such as the northern bobwhite and eastern meadowlark.

Objective: During 2015, Dr. Romanach will provide support for linking a number of projects with the Peninsular Florida landscape Conservation Cooperatives (PFLCC) tools. These projects include but are not limited to:
a. Climate envelop modeling updates

Scenarios, CLIP, and inundation modeling will be incorporated into a decision support framework to help planners and managers view the information and be able to develop management options and adaptation plans in areas where needed.

The Peninsular Florida LCC (PFLCC) uses a science-based, data-rich approach to define priorities across the landscape.

Online decision support tools are proliferating to serve the needs of environmental managers and conservation practitioners, but most are static after their creation.  Aging software components and datasets can lead to rapid obsolescence or inoperable tools.  In the Great Lakes basin, the Fishwer

The emerging multi-LCC Ecological Places in Cities Network integrates the ecological and urban communities to guide and promote conservation practices, such as those across the monarch flyway.

This project acquired, federated and curated approximately one million new observations to the Avian Knowledge Network.

The Washington Connected Landscapes Project is a highly leveraged effort to provide scientific analyses and tools necessary to conserve wildlife habitat connectivity.

The Washington Connected Landscapes Project is a highly leveraged effort to provide scientific analyses and tools necessary to conserve wildlife habitat connectivity.

Aging infrastructure is creating a pressing national need to align priorities between civil engineering and other interests.  Restoring ecological connectivity of river networks that are fragmented by dams and road crossings has become a prominent objective for environmental managers across the c

Dozens of species of landbirds, such as warblers, hummingbirds, and orioles, migrate through the Northeastern United States from their summer breeding grounds in the U.S. and Canada to their nonbreeding grounds as far south as South America.

Coastal marshes serve a variety of important functions including flood control, spawning/rearing areas for marine life, and critical habitat for many bird species of conservation concern.

Landscape permeability is the ability of a land area to allow organisms to move and disperse, equivalent to what some authors call “habitat connectivity.” This project evaluated and mapped the relative landscape permeability for terrestrial organisms across the eastern United States and southeast

This project is intended to address a high priority science need for the North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC): the need to enhance the capacity of partners to assess and design sustainable landscape conservation for wildlife across the eastern United States.

Rutgers University and Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey have partnered on a project entitled Protection of Critical Beach-nesting Bird Habitats in the Wake of Severe Coastal Storms under the North Atlantic LCC coordinated Hurricane Sandy Disaster Mitigation Funds beach resiliency projec

The North Atlantic LCC and Northeast states developed a synthesis of regional conservation information for State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) revisions.

This project brings together the major partners involved in road-stream crossings to assess river and stream continuity and set priorities for restoring connectivity, and reducing flood damage to road crossings, within the North Atlantic region.

Connect the Connecticut is a partnership effort to create a landscape conservation design for the Connecticut River watershed that provides a roadmap for identifying the best starting places for conservation — areas that partners agree should be priorities in order to ensure that important specie

In response to the threats of land use and changing environmental conditions, the North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) and the Northeast Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (NEAFWA) coordinated a team of partners from 13 states, the U.S.

In response to the threats of land use and changing environmental conditions, the North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) and the Northeast Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (NEAFWA) coordinated a team of partners from 13 states, the U.S.

This multi-faceted project aims to assess nesting habitat for the Federally-listed piping plover (Charadrius melodus) and other beach-dwelling species on Atlantic coastal beaches and to forecast future habitat under accelerating sea level rise.

This project built off a first phase of work funded by Northeast states through the Regional Conservation Needs program by assessing the vulnerability to climate change of 7-10 additional northeastern habitat types, including forests, wetlands, and aquatic systems.

This collaborative project provided biologists and managers along the Atlantic coast with tools to predict effects of accelerating sea-level rise on the distribution of piping plover breeding habitat, test those predictions, and feed results back into the modeling framework to improve predictive

The Chesapeake Conservancy and its partners will use the landscape science products created through the North Atlantic LCC to identify and prioritize locations and methods that would best address the regional and local conservation needs identified by these communities.

This project developed a series of maps depicting the distribution and probability of occurrence of marine birds in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean.

The Conservation Planning Atlas (CPA) was created to help fulfill the mission of the NALCC and to create a common platform and communication method for the partnership.

This agreement supported the Regional Conservation Opportunity Areas project, later renamed "Nature's Network," of the North Atlantic LCC partnership.

This agreement supported the Regional Conservation Opportunity Areas project, later renamed "Nature's Network," of the North Atlantic LCC partnership.

The objective of this project was to develop tools to assist managers in protecting and restoring streams for brook trout and other aquatic resources in the face of threats such as climate change and development.

The Highstead Foundation worked with partners to deliver, disseminate, and communicate North Atlantic LCC science products to help advance the knowledge base, strategic conservation planning, and on-the-ground conservation success of regional conservation partnerships (RCPs).

The purpose of this demonstration project was to show how North Atlantic LCC science products can be used to inform conservation for a Northeast habitat and resilience "hotspot." The Trust for Public Land integrated LCC and other science products into a clearinghouse and analysis tool for parcel-

This study aids in developing a synergistic ecological-coastal resiliency framework for a significant portion of the coastal habitat on Fire Island.

The grant’s objectives include expansion of the LandScope Chesapeake system to support and promote the shared objectives of the Chesapeake Conservation Partnership, of which North Atlantic LCC and NatureServe are active members.

This cooperative agreement, part of the suite of North Atlantic LCC Hurricane Sandy Marsh resilience projects, will increase understanding of how marshes across a range of conditions in the Northeast are likely to respond to sea level rise and storms.

1 year of maintenance (Oct 1, 2014 – Sept 30, 2015) of Maintenance For 4 CPAs in the SE (SE Region CPA, South Atlantic LCC CPA, Pennisular Florida CPA, Gulf Coastal Plains and Ozarks CPA).

We will develop SMART-SLEUTH, an advanced spatially explicit modeling framework designed to augment the current SLEUTH model with sophisticated smart-growth capabilities.

The Nature Conservancy (TNC) recently completed an unprecedented assessment of almost 14,000 dams in the Northeastern United States.