Projects By Category: Vulnerability Assessment

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives use a collaborative approach to identify landscape-scale conservation solutions. LCCs work across jurisdictional and political boundaries to work with partners to: meet unfilled conservation needs, develop decision support tools, share data and knowledge and facilitate and foster partnerships.

As part of a shared science strategy, LCCs coordinate closely with the National Climate Change and Wildlife Center and the eight regional Climate Science Centers as well as Migratory Bird Joint Ventures and National Fish Habitat Partnerships across North America.

  • Appalachian

Assessing Future Energy Development across the Appalachian LCC used models that combined data on energy development trends and identified where these may intersect with important natural resource and ecosystem services to give a more comprehensive picture of what potential energy development coul

  • Great Northern

Increased network capacity is a priority identified by the GNLCC and the RMPF Leadership Team to build on the organizational structure of LCC Partner Forums.

  • Arctic

The Beaufort Sea coast in Arctic Alaska and neighboring northern Canada has recently experienced extreme and accelerated climate change, including a dramatic reduction in summer sea ice.

  • Aleutian and Bering Sea Islands

In Alaska, changes in snow, ice, and weather, have resulted in risks to human lives, infrastructure damage, threats to valuable natural resources, and disruption of hunting, fishing, and livelihoods.

  • Aleutian and Bering Sea Islands

This project integrates projections from two climate downscaling approaches into a series of future climate scenarios that will be used to assess the vulnerability of resources and ecosystem services within the Aleutian and Bering Sea Islands LCC.

  • Aleutian and Bering Sea Islands

Partners developed a simulation model to better show how various projections associated with increased marine traffic in the Bering Sea might look in the coming decades.

  • California

While meadows cover less than one percent of the Sierra Nevada, these ecosystems are of high ecological importance given their role in carbon and nitrogen storage, mediation of surface water flows, groundwater recharge, sediment filtration, and as refugia for numerous species.

  • California

This project uses existing decision support tools (DST) in a scenario planning analysis for the South Bay Salt Ponds Restoration Project (SBSPRP) as a case study that other bayland managers can reference for best practices for using these DSTs for adaptation planning.

  • California

This project used the NatureServe Climate Change Vulnerability Index tool to assess vulnerability of 140 bird species that breed in the Sierra Nevada and will develop a peer-reviewed Climate Change Adaptation Strategy for Sierra Nevada bird species that are most vulnerable to climate change.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

Gulf Coast Prairie Landscape Conservation Cooperative partners are undertaking numerous efforts to conserve and restore coastal resources, many of which are sensitive to the effects of climate change.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

Climate, sea level rise, and urbanization are undergoing unprecedented levels of combined change and are expected to have large effects on natural resources—particularly along the Gulf of Mexico coastline (Gulf Coast).

  • Western Alaska

The Integrated Ecosystem Model for Alaska project (IEM) uses down-scaled climate models as the drivers of ecosystem change to produce forecasts of future fire, vegetation, permafrost and hydrology regimes at a resolution of 1km.

  • Western Alaska

This project provided systematic coastal habitat imagery and mapping for the Alaska Peninsula shoreline following the Alaska ShoreZone Mapping Protocol and made these products web-accessible. The completed mapping product is available on the ShoreZone website in a searchable dataset.

  • Western Alaska

The Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) encompasses the southernmost, warmest parts of the arctic tundra biome and is renowned for its high biological productivity and large subsistence-based human population.

  • Great Basin

FY2014Although the future of sage grouse depends on the future of sagebrush, we have limited ability to anticipate impacts of climate change on sagebrush populations.

  • Northwest Boreal

Landscape conservation design in Alaska is an opportunity for the U.S.

  • North Pacific

The project incorporates Heiltsuk Traditional Knowledge and Values into ecosystem-based management planning within Strategic Landscape Reserve Design (SLRD) Landscape Units. The SLRD process seeks to identify areas to set aside from logging (harvesting) over short and long term timeframes.

  • North Pacific

The Washington Connected Landscapes Project is a highly leveraged effort to provide scientific analyses and tools necessary to conserve wildlife habitat connectivity.

  • North Pacific

The Washington Connected Landscapes Project is a highly leveraged effort to provide scientific analyses and tools necessary to conserve wildlife habitat connectivity.

  • North Pacific

A recent (2008-2012) outbreak of Geometrid moths has decimated subsistence berry harvest in South Central Alaska. This project will develop a risk model to predict where subsistence berry plants will be most resistant to Geometrid attack.

  • Great Basin

FY2016This project will address limited tribal capacity for vulnerability assessment by providing guidance and data tailored to the needs and capacities of Northwest and Great Basin tribes. Specifically, the project will:

  • Great Basin

FY2014Workshops that provide tribal representatives with an introduction to planning for climate change impacts.

  • North Pacific

The Services goal with this project is to bridge the gap between guidance documents and field staff who develop Habitat Conservation Plans (HCPs).

  • North Pacific

WDFW will use funds provided by the NPLCC to integrate climate change impacts and implications into our State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) Revision.

  • North Pacific

WDFW will use funds provided by the NPLCC to integrate climate change impacts and implications into our State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) Revision.

  • North Pacific

Building on currently available resources and on the prior climate adaptation experiences of our team,which includes tribal staff and a cultural anthropologist who is also an enrolled member of theConfederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, we will co-develop a guidebook for tribal adaptation.

  • North Pacific

Practitioners struggle with how to identify, prioritize, and implement climate adaptation actions that can effectively reduce vulnerability; these decisions may be more easily made and successfully implemented if they are informed by scientific evidence.

  • North Pacific

The Jamestown SKlallam and Port Gamble SKlallam tribes, and many other tribes in the PacificNorthwest, rely on ESA listed fish species for subsistence as well as cultural and economic practices.Concern has grown over the impacts climate change might have throughout the 21st Century ontraditional

  • North Pacific

This project, with funding support by the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative andpartners, will address the need to better understand the impact that climate change will have on oursalmon subsistence resources in southeast Alaska.

  • North Pacific

Background: Yellow-cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis) is an economically and culturally important tree of the North Pacific coastal rainforest, ranging from northern California through Southeast Alaska.

  • North Pacific

The forum will have two major goals:. First, to share the successes and learnings of past LCC investments on the subjects of Traditional Ecological Knowledge, subsistence resources, and climate adaptation plans.

  • Great Northern

This project will apply the results of an on-going climate change vulnerability assessment to the management of two complex landscapes.

  • Pacific Islands

·       Anticipating potential shifts in plant communities has been a major challenge in climate-change ecology.

  • North Atlantic

An urgent need exists to uniformly assess river corridors, including floodplains, and to prioritize areas for protection across the North Atlantic landscape. These are daunting tasks since there are no well-defined methods to delineate and assess scores of diverse river corridors in this region.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

This project will use existing climate change scenarios and sea-level rise projections to create a Climate Change Adaptation Plan in collaboration with the Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

Submersed aquatic vegetation, a critical component of highly productive coastal ecosystems, is greatly affected by sea level rise.

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes

The project had four explicit objectives: 1) Conduct a climate vulnerability assessment of Species of Greatest Need of Conservation and major habitat types 2) Identify conservation strategies that increase resiliency or adaptive capacity, or mitigate the effects of climate change 3) Outline an ad

  • Western Alaska

This project evaluated the potential impacts of storm surges and relative sea level rise on nesting geese and eider species that commonly breed on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (Y-K Delta).

  • Western Alaska

Full Project Title

Project Summary

  • Western Alaska

The project will complete an extensive mapping of coastal change along the entire coastline of the Western Alaska Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC). The work will provide important baseline information on the distribution and magnitude of landscape changes over the past 41 years.

  • Western Alaska

Southwest Alaska is one of the fastest warming regions on Earth and its aquatic resources are at distinct risk from changing climate.

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes

Researchers assessed how an expansion of forest reserves and climate-adaptive  management may improve ecological connectivity and resilience under different climate scenarios.  Resilience is measured as the capacity for these systems to maintain extant forest communities and aboveground live biom

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes

Full life-cycle vulnerability assessments are identifying the effects of climate change on nongame migratory birds that are of conservation concern and breed in the upper Midwest and Great Lakes region.

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes

For management agencies, there is a growing need to understand (1) how climate change affects and will continue to affect wildlife populations of conservation concern, and (2) how the negative Upper Midwest Great Lakes Landscape Conservation Cooperative Request for Funding 2013 demographic effect

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes

The primary goals of this proposed project are to help identify and prioritize threats to endangered mussels and to determine whether existing environmental concentrations of ammonia, copper, and major ions in sediment pore-water are contributing to the decline of native mussel populations, as in

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes

This project directly addresses the need for integration of climate change information and strategies into Wisconsin’s Wildlife Action Plan (WWAP) as identified by Upper Midwest and Great Lakes Land Conservation Cooperative.

  • Western Alaska

Thermokarst lakes (lakes formed in a depression by meltwater from thawing permafrost) are common features and important ecosystems in Alaska.

  • Western Alaska

Western Alaska is one of the fastest warming regions on the globe and recent trends are expected to continue into the next century, likely having substantial effects on the aquatic resources of this region.

  • Western Alaska

To assess the vulnerability of a region to invasive plants, documentation of the presence or absence of invasive plants is necessary. This project expands on work initiated by the EPA to identify invasive plants in rural communities in the Bristol Bay region.