Projects By Category: Vulnerability Assessment

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives use a collaborative approach to identify landscape-scale conservation solutions. LCCs work across jurisdictional and political boundaries to work with partners to: meet unfilled conservation needs, develop decision support tools, share data and knowledge and facilitate and foster partnerships.

As part of a shared science strategy, LCCs coordinate closely with the National Climate Change and Wildlife Center and the eight regional Climate Science Centers as well as Migratory Bird Joint Ventures and National Fish Habitat Partnerships across North America.

  • Great Northern

This project will apply the results of an on-going climate change vulnerability assessment to the management of two complex landscapes.

  • Pacific Islands

·       Anticipating potential shifts in plant communities has been a major challenge in climate-change ecology.

  • North Atlantic

An urgent need exists to uniformly assess river corridors, including floodplains, and to prioritize areas for protection across the North Atlantic landscape. These are daunting tasks since there are no well-defined methods to delineate and assess scores of diverse river corridors in this region.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

This project will use existing climate change scenarios and sea-level rise projections to create a Climate Change Adaptation Plan in collaboration with the Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana.

  • Gulf Coast Prairie

Submersed aquatic vegetation, a critical component of highly productive coastal ecosystems, is greatly affected by sea level rise.

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes

The project had four explicit objectives: 1) Conduct a climate vulnerability assessment of Species of Greatest Need of Conservation and major habitat types 2) Identify conservation strategies that increase resiliency or adaptive capacity, or mitigate the effects of climate change 3) Outline an ad

  • Western Alaska

To evaluate the potential impacts of changes on waterbird habitat due to climate change, this project examines historic responses of water birds to storm surges on the Y-K Delta by examining waterbird distribution and breeding parameters before and after coastal storm surges between 1985 and 2012

  • Western Alaska

No one has better knowledge and opportunity to document coastal storm effects than the people who live in coastal communities. By training a network of Local Environmental Observers to collect coastal storm data, we improve local capacity to engage in coastal observations.

  • Western Alaska

Extensive mapping of coastal change will provide important baseline information on the distribution and magnitude of landscape changes over the past 41 years. With this analysis, changes can be summarized for different land ownership or other units to assess the extent of recent habitat loss.

  • Western Alaska

The primary goal of this project is to facilitate the completion of ShoreZone mapping of biophysical resources of the coastal supratidal, intertidal, and subtidal areas in the southern Alaska Peninsula, and to make this mapping data web accessible and available to all who request the data.

  • Western Alaska

This project will compile and analyze existing stream, river and lake temperatures data in SW Alaska, and will result in refinement of the monitoring plan developed to characterize thermal responses to ongoing climate change in the region.

  • Western Alaska

This project focuses on permafrost change and its effect on lake habitat in Western Alaska. Resource managers and local communities need spatially explicit information to determine past lake habitat changes, identify spatial patterns correlated to climate, and project future habitat changes.

  • Western Alaska

This project will provide an understanding of how precipitation patterns interact with watershed topography to control stream water sources and thermal regimes.

  • Western Alaska

This project supports invasive plant surveys in Bristol Bay communities.

  • Western Alaska

This project evaluates the connections between climate change impacts and health in 3 Bristol Bay communities: Nondalton, a lake community, Levelock, a river community, and Pilot Point, a coastal community.

  • Western Alaska

This project will use ShoreZone imagery collected as part of another partnership effort to map nearly 1,600 km of coastline between Wales and Kotzebue, completing the Kotzebue Sound shoreline for inclusion in the state-wide ShoreZone dataset.

  • Western Alaska

This project will use existing ShoreZone coastal imagery to map 719 km of shoreline in Bristol Bay, from Cape Constantine to Cape Newenham. This section of coastline is an extremely important herring spawning area and an important component of the Bristol Bay fisheries

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes

Researchers assessed how an expansion of forest reserves and climate-adaptive  management may improve ecological connectivity and resilience under different climate scenarios.  Resilience is measured as the capacity for these systems to maintain extant forest communities and aboveground live biom

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes

Full life-cycle vulnerability assessments are identifying the effects of climate change on nongame migratory birds that are of conservation concern and breed in the upper Midwest and Great Lakes region.

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes

For management agencies, there is a growing need to understand (1) how climate change affects and will continue to affect wildlife populations of conservation concern, and (2) how the negative Upper Midwest Great Lakes Landscape Conservation Cooperative Request for Funding 2013 demographic effect

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes

The primary goals of this proposed project are to help identify and prioritize threats to endangered mussels and to determine whether existing environmental concentrations of ammonia, copper, and major ions in sediment pore-water are contributing to the decline of native mussel populations, as in

  • Upper Midwest and Great Lakes

This project directly addresses the need for integration of climate change information and strategies into Wisconsin’s Wildlife Action Plan (WWAP) as identified by Upper Midwest and Great Lakes Land Conservation Cooperative.

  • Pacific Islands

Sea-level rise (SLR) is one of the biggest threats to the Hawaiian coastline, and resource managers of coastal wetlands in Hawai‘i must begin planning now for future impacts. The majority of these impacts are expected to occur from 2040 – 2100.

  • Pacific Islands

Pelagic seabirds (albatrosses and petrels) find food by relying on distinct oceanographic features like transition zones, upwelling, and large eddies.

  • Pacific Islands

This report is published as one of a series of technical inputs to the National Climate Assessment (NCA) 2013 report.

  • Pacific Islands

Our project focuses on understanding patterns and causes of recent population declines in the Haleakala silversword that are associated with decreasing precipitation, increasing temperature, and related climate changes in Hawaii’s high-elevation ecosystems.

  • Pacific Islands

In Hawaiʽi and elsewhere, research efforts have focused on two main approaches to determine the potential impacts of climate change on individual species: estimating species vulnerabilities and projecting responses of species to expected changes.

  • Pacific Islands

One of the impacts of global climate change for the Hawaiian Islands is a projected increase in sea level of about one meter by the year 2100. This change will impact both biological and cultural resources located along the coastline.

  • Pacific Islands

The primary objective of this project is to bring together Hawaii's climate change scientists, Molokai's traditional fishpond managers, and other natural resource managers to share scientific and cultural knowledge and work together as a team to identify adaptive management strategies f

  • Pacific Islands

Past analysis has shown that temperature-dependent avian malaria is likely to reduce overall available Hawaiian forest bird habitat with temperature increases.

  • North Pacific

This project builds on existing work by the Washington Habitat Connectivity Working Group to provide scientific analyses and tools necessary to conserve wildlife habitat connectivity.

  • North Pacific

This project will look at how climate change has altered hydrologic systems, Pacific salmon habitat, and survival of salmon in the Nooksack River watershed. It will develop an adaptation plan that can be adopted and integrated into management plans.

  • North Pacific

Hydrologic projections will be developed for diverse wetland habitats in the Pacific Northwest for the 2020s, 2040s and 2080s, which can be used to support ecological and landscape-based vulnerability assessments and climate adaptation planning.

  • North Pacific

This project continues the work previously funded by the NPLCC, Climate Adaptation Planning for British Columbia Provincial Parks: A guide to conducting a rapid assessment of climate impacts on park management objectives.

  • North Pacific

This project will utilize a landscape connectivity simulator and a genetic simulation program to model functional (dispersal and genetic) connectivity in the North Pacific Landscape.

  • North Pacific

This project will identify existing institutional and cultural barriers to the sharing of Tribal TEK and expansion of Tribal management and provide recommendations for their resolution at local, regional and national levels.

  • North Pacific

A soil vulnerability index and a map indicating where forest cover are likely to be most affected by changes in precipitation and temperature will be developed.

  • North Pacific

This project will apply the results of an on-going climate change vulnerability assessment to the management of two complex landscapes: the Willamette Basin and British Columbia Protected Areas.

  • North Pacific

Incorporate Heiltsuk Traditional Knowledge and Values into ecosystem-based management planning within Strategic Landscape Reserve Design (SLRD) Landscape Units. Identify areas to set aside from logging (harvesting) over short and long term timeframes.

  • North Pacific

This project will utilize traditional ecological knowledge to establish traditional gathering practices. Interviews will be conducted with traditional gatherers (a.k.a. subsistence) over the last two generations to get baseline data.

  • North Pacific

Create conceptual models of environmental and community health indicators in reference to climate forecasts. Sensitivity of species and habitats to climate will be cross-walked with recently developed Coast Salish community health indicators (e.g.

  • North Pacific

Produce a base GIS map layer of riparian area and condition and to prioritize riparian areas likely to increase biological resilience to climate change withing WA and OR.

  • North Pacific

Obtain information regarding past catastrophic events, such as tsunamis, and TEK through oral history interviews with Tolowa elders regarding the effects of climate change and tsunamis on traditional smelt fishing camps; generate a GIS model of coastal inundation due to sea level rise and overla

  • North Pacific

A sea level rise vulnerability assessment has been completed for the shorelines of San Juan County Washington.

  • North Pacific

A recent (2008-2012) outbreak of Geometrid moths has decimated subsistence berry harvest in South Central Alaska. This project will develop a risk model to predict where subsistence berry plants will be most resistant to Geometrid attack.

  • North Pacific

This project will apply sound science to development of best management practices in the preparation of coast redwoods for climate change at a workshop and related field trip involving multiple partners and others.

  • North Pacific

This project will complete a tribally-based climate change vulnerability assessment t and adaptation plan for Eulachon that spawn in the Chilkoot and Chilkat rivers near Haines, Alaska.

  • North Pacific

The vulnerability of Pacific Lamprey to climate change will be evaluated by using an approach that relies on existing climate change model projections for stream conditions (i.e.

  • North Pacific

This project will assess impacts of climate change on stream resources by considering the role of thermal heterogeneity and altered hydrologic regimes.

  • North Pacific

Baseline information required to assess sea-level rise impacts to marsh habitats will be compiled. The project will provide relevant information to local managers that are key components to long-term monitoring to understand ecosystem responses to sea-level rise and storms.