Resources

LCCs have produced a wealth of informational documents, reports, fact sheets, webinars and more to help support resource managers in designing and delivering conservation at landscape scales.

This report provides an assessment of climate change-related challenges, needs, and opportunities to advance landscape-scale conservation, climate change adaptation, and sustainable resource management in the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NPLCC) region. The NPLCC funded this report to inform NPLCC members, specifically the Science and Traditional Ecological Knowledge (S-TEK) Subcommittee, as they assess priorities and develop their 2013-2016 Strategy for Science and Traditional Ecological Knowledge.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

A combination of focus groups and usability tests were used to explore the needs and preferences of a variety of NPLCC stakeholders as regards data management platform content, format, and features. This information was used to inform NPLCC decisions about how best to meet needs not currently met by LC MAP through adjustments or enhancements to LC MAP itself or by connecting stakeholders with other platforms or portals.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The overarching goal of the project was to develop overlapping conceptual models of environmental and community health indicators in reference to climate forecasts. The sensitivity of species and habitats to climate were cross-walked with recently developed Coast Salish community health indicators (e.g. ceremonial use, knowledge exchange, and physiological well-being) in order to demonstrate how Indigenous Knowledge can be used in conjunction with established landscape-level conservation indicators (e.g. shellfish and water-quality) and employed to identify resource management priorities.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Washington Connected Landscapes Project is a highly leveraged effort to provide scientific analyses and tools necessary to conserve wildlife habitat connectivity.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This project acquired, federated and curated approximately one million new observations to the Avian Knowledge Network. These new observations, in addition to millions of existing records, were used to model the distribution and abundance of 26 species of land birds in the southern portion of the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NPLCC) region including CA, OR and WA. The models were based on climate and modeled vegetation.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This project will utilize traditional ecological knowledge to establish traditional gathering practices. Interviews will be conducted with traditional gatherers (a.k.a. subsistence) over the last two generations to get baseline data. The project will have a direct focus on the four (4) federally recognized Tribes on Prince of Wales Island (Craig, Hydaburg, Kasaan and Klawock).

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Central Council Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska (Central Council) assisted the Organized Village of Kasaan (OVK) in their NPLCC grant, Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Climate Change project. A survey was developed and used to interview traditional gathers on the time of year they did subsistence gathering.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Cascadia Parner Forum fosters a network of natural resource practitioners working with the NPLCC and GNLCC to guild the adaptive capacity of the landscape and species living within it. This project supported three complementary transboundary climate adaptation and habitat connectivity activities in the Cascadia region: 1) Transboundary Climate Analysis by the Washington Wildlife Habitat Connectivity Working Group, 2) WildLinks workshop, and 3) Cascadia Partner Forum.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This annotated bibliography is a supplement to the Guidelines for Considering Traditional Knowledges in Climate Change Initiatives and is intended to demonstrate the ways that existing is already considering TKs in law, policy and natural resource management.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

he Transboundary Forest Science and Management Dialogue held Feb 24-26 in Vancouver was the third in the series of transboundary meetings and the first held in BC - the previous two were hosted in Juneau, AK by the USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station, and the Alaska Coastal Rainforest Center (ACRC), University of Alaska Southeast. The overall goal of the invitational dialogue was to provide a forum for (ongoing) coordination and integration of data and scientific work across the north coastal temperate rainforest. Particularly, this dialogue strove to continue to:

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Protecting and restoring ecological connectivity is a leading climate adaptation strategy for
biodiversity conservation (Heller & Zavaleta 2009, Lawler 2009), because species are expected
to have difficulty tracking shifting climates across fragmented landscapes (Thomas et al. 2004).
Connectivity conservation is thus a primary focus of numerous large-scale climate adaptation
initiatives (e.g., U.S. Department of Interior’s Landscape Conservation Cooperatives), and a core

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The University of Oregon Environmental Studies Program (UO ENVS) is proposing to work with the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative in support of the Pacific Northwest Tribal Climate Change Project, which is aimed at building an understanding of the impacts that climate change may have on American Indian and Alaska Native tribal culture and sovereignty.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

A conservation and restoration priorities tool was developed that provides online access to regional information including: climate change projections, watershed condition, freshwater and terrestrial species, forest ecosystem information and invasive species information.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

A conservation and restoration priorities tool was developed that provides online access to regional information including: climate change projections, watershed condition, freshwater and terrestrial species, forest ecosystem information and invasive species information.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Alaska Coastal Rainforest Center (ACRC) lead a second workshop to develop cross-boundary geospatial and climate data sets in support of regional conservation applications in the coastal temperate rainforest zone of Southeast Alaska and British Columbia.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

contains digital elevation models in TIFF format for salt marshes surveyed within the Humboldt Bay during the summer of 2012 and the spring of 2013.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

contains an excel format and shapefile format of the vegetation survey data collected within Humboldt Bay during the summer of 2012.



Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Alaska Coastal Rainforest Center (ACRC) lead a second workshop to develop cross-boundary geospatial and climate data sets in support of regional conservation applications in the coastal temperate rainforest zone of Southeast Alaska and British Columbia.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Overview Land and resource managers in the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NPLCC) currently lack conservation planning tools that can directly feed into the planning, design, delivery, and monitoring of ecosystems across all levels of biodiversity from genes to ecosystems. The North Pacific Forest Landscape Corridor and Connectivity Project utilized a landscape connectivity simulator (UNICOR) and a genetic simulation program (CDPOP) to model the functional (dispersal and genetic) connectivity in the North Pacific Landscape.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Montane Conifer Connectivity of areas of high elevation and high human footprint in the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative study area. This application provides Montane Conifer Connectivity for 2000 and 2080 (A1B).

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This project acquired, federated and curated approximately one million new observations to the Avian Knowledge Network. These new observations, in addition to millions of existing records, were used to model the distribution and abundance of 26 species of land birds in the southern portion of the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NPLCC) region including CA, OR and WA. The models were based on climate and modeled vegetation.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This assessment is based on review of available literature and examination of historical air photos that date to the 1940’s, topography developed from LiDAR (light detection and ranging) data obtained in 2007, limited field mapping of beach, dune and fluvial stratigraphy, discussions with other coastal dune geomorphologists, and reconnaissance site visits to the project area and environs. Radiocarbon dating drew from the work of Tushingham et al. (no date), Meyer et al. (2011), Bicknell and Austin (1991) and unpublished data developed by park staff.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

On September 6-7, 2013, 30 redwoods researchers, managers, and experts attended a workshop to share information and develop preliminary strategies to manage redwoods for persistence under climate change. Our discussion revolved around existing goals and objectives, current and future trends (including climate change projections), and how to manage for resilience, resistance, and transition.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Alaska Coastal Rainforest Center (ACRC) lead a second workshop to develop cross-boundary geospatial and climate data sets in support of regional conservation applications in the coastal temperate rainforest zone of Southeast Alaska and British Columbia.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This project developed a soil vulnerability index and map indicating where forest cover will be most affected by climate change. Using this map, researchers developed a greater understanding of potential changes in soil moisture and temperature regimes under future climate conditions. They then evaluated how this information could be used to improve vegetation models across the landscape. They compared the results of different modeling approaches to the soil vulnerability map, synthesized the state of knowledge and uncertainty, and introduced management implications for action.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Climate change has significant effects on critical ecosystem functions such as carbon and water cycling. Vegetation and especially forest ecosystems play an important role in the carbon and hydrological cycles. Vegetation models that include detailed belowground processes require accurate soil data to decrease uncertainty and increase realism in their simulations. The MC2 DGVM uses three modules to simulate biogeography, biogeochemistry and fire effects, all three of which use soil data either directly or indirectly.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The over-arching theme of this work is that soil data affect the performance and realism of vegetation models with particular focus on their ability to predict or explain disturbances such as fire or disease. We tested the sensitivity of the Excel version of the 3-PG model to soil properties and applied this information to understanding bark beetle attacks in drought-stressed forests. We tested the sensitivity of the MC2 model to soil depth with a particular focus on how soils affect the biogeochemistry and fire modules of the Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (DGVM).

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Chugachmiut is a tribal consortium representing the seven tribes of the Chugach Region of Alaska (Chenega Bay, Eyak, Nanwalek, Port Graham, Qutekcak, Tatitlek, and Valdez). The Native people of this region rely heavily on subsistence gathered food for sustenance and nourishment. Studies by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game show that a significant portion of the total foods consumed, 375 pounds per person per year, are from subsistence hunting and gathering.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

For hundreds of years, Pacific lamprey and Pacific eulachon have been important traditional foods for Native American tribes of the Columbia River Basin and coastal areas of Oregon and Washington. These fish have large ranges – spending part of their lives in the ocean and part in freshwater streams – and they require specific environmental conditions to survive, migrate, and reproduce. For these reasons, Pacific lamprey and Pacific eulachon are likely threatened by a variety of climate change impacts to both their ocean and freshwater habitats.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) and their many associated species create an iconic ecosystem, yet the impacts of stressors, including a variety of land use practices and climate change, threaten their continued persistence on the landscape. In September 2013, we held a workshop with researchers, managers, and other redwoods experts to explore the likely impacts of climate change and develop some initial strategies for adaptation.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Yurok Tribe Environmental Program (YTEP) received a grant in 2012 from the North PacificLandscape Conservation Cooperative (NPLCC) with partial funding from the Northwest Climate Science Center (NWCSC) to conduct a study entitled, “Utilizing Yurok Traditional Ecological Knowledge to Inform Climate Change Priorities”. This final report summarizes the objectives, methods and results of final analysis of work performed during the project period (October 2012–March 2014).

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Chugachmiut is a tribal consortium representing the seven tribes of the Chugach Region of Alaska (Chenega Bay, Eyak, Nanwalek, Port Graham, Qutekcak, Tatitlek, and Valdez). The Native people of this region rely heavily on subsistence gathered food for sustenance and nourishment. Studies by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game show that a significant portion of the total foods consumed, 375 pounds per person per year, are from subsistence hunting and gathering.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This project will complete a tribally-based climate change vulnerability assessment t and adaptation plan for Eulachon that spawn in the Chilkoot and Chilkat rivers near Haines, Alaska. Local monitoring will collect data on spawning populations in the Chilkoot River, and a tribal stakeholder group will be convened to analyze climate change projections, apply traditional knowledge, rank climate vulnerabilities, and prioritized adaptation strategies.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

For hundreds of years, Pacific lamprey and Pacific eulachon have been important traditional foods for Native American tribes of the Columbia River Basin and coastal areas of Oregon and Washington. These fish have large ranges – spending part of their lives in the ocean and part in freshwater streams – and they require specific environmental conditions to survive, migrate, and reproduce. For these reasons, Pacific lamprey and Pacific eulachon are likely threatened by a variety of climate change impacts to both their ocean and freshwater habitats.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Presentation for the NPLCC webinar series - Managing Coast Redwoods for Resilience and Adaptation in Changing Climate Presentation

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This project builds upon existing data and collaborations to incorporate climate change and economic considerations into a decision support framework for prioritizing restoration of passage. Planned outcomes will help guide on-the-ground decisions in terms of adapting to anticipated climate effects, allocating limited resources for restoration, and providing tools that can be adapted across the NPLCC and beyond.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This project will complete a tribally-based climate change vulnerability assessment t and adaptation plan for Eulachon that spawn in the Chilkoot and Chilkat rivers near Haines, Alaska. Local monitoring will collect data on spawning populations in the Chilkoot River, and a tribal stakeholder group will be convened to analyze climate change projections, apply traditional knowledge, rank climate vulnerabilities, and prioritized adaptation strategies.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This project will create a targeted and easily understandable guide to tools that support landscape-level planning in the face of climate change for NPLCC partners. The guide will build on previous NPLCC research on decision support needs with an emphasis on tools currently in use in the region. A survey of NPLCC partners will discover who is currently using or planning to use tools in the region, tools they are using, how well these tools are meeting their needs, and regional and outside experts engaged in tool use.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

A sea level rise vulnerability assessment has been completed for the shorelines of San Juan County Washington. This tool was developed to enhance understanding among land managers, provide a scientific foundation for shoreline management decisions and improve conservation of shoreline processes critical to ecosystem health. This project will create a comprehensive communication strategy that includes improving the model's credibility, researching adaptation strategies, creating decision support tools, and hosting focus meetings.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

A sea level rise vulnerability assessment has been completed for the shorelines of San Juan County Washington. This tool was developed to enhance understanding among land managers, provide a scientific foundation for shoreline management decisions and improve conservation of shoreline processes critical to ecosystem health. This project will create a comprehensive communication strategy that includes improving the model's credibility, researching adaptation strategies, creating decision support tools, and hosting focus meetings.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Streams across the world are highly fragmented due to the presence of in-stream barriers (e.g., dams and stream-road crossings), many of which restrict or block fish passage. Retrofitting or replacing these structures is a high priority for restoring habitat connectivity for native fishes and other aquatic organisms in the Pacific Northwest. The task of restoring habitat connectivity for problematic stream-road crossings is daunting given the many thousands of barriers that are present and the massive financial investments required.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Quartz Valley Indian Reservation will partner with tribes, federal agencies and higher education institutions in the Klamath Basin on a tribal youth intern program for the summer of 2014. This program will build on current efforts to integrate western science and TEK for climate change planning and adaptation in the Klamath Basin.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Power point presentation from a NPLCC webinar on June 5, 2014 by Nature Serve on landscape level planning tools.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

In-person workshops will be conducted to bring the results from the USGS Program on Coastal Ecosystems Response to Climate Change's study on projected climate change effects on coastal environments (funded by NPLCC and NW CSC) to managers in their communities. The workshops will include presenting initial results, identifying their climate science needs, and introducing a decision-support tool.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Quartz Valley Indian Reservation will partner with tribes, federal agencies and higher education institutions in the Klamath Basin on a tribal youth intern program for the summer of 2014. This program will build on current efforts to integrate western science and TEK for climate change planning and adaptation in the Klamath Basin.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This project will assess impacts of climate change on stream resources by considering the role of thermal heterogeneity and altered hydrologic regimes. The project will look at streams in Washington, Oregon, and California to develop a case study that stream stewards and conservation planners can use to assess vulnerability for Pacific salmon.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This project will provide a comprehensive synthesis of beaver recolonization science and techniques for successful reintroduction or population expansion through a thorough, in-depth, coordinated review of all North American beaver-related information, including identification of research gaps and data needs, and recommendations for project implementation. This information will be disseminated through a series of one-day workshops.

Date posted: June 23, 2018