Resources

LCCs have produced a wealth of informational documents, reports, fact sheets, webinars and more to help support resource managers in designing and delivering conservation at landscape scales.

In California, the near-shore area where the ocean meets the land is a highly productive yet sensitive region that supports a wealth of wildlife, including several native bird species. These saltmarshes, mudflats, and shallow bays are not only critical for wildlife, but they also provide economic and recreational benefits to local communities. Today, sea-level rise, more frequent and stronger storms, saltwater intrusion, and warming water temperatures are among the threats that are altering these important habitats.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Salt marsh elevation and geomorphic stability depends on mineral sedimentation. Many Mediterranean-climate salt marshes along southern California, USA coast import sediment during El Niño storm events, but sediment fluxes and mechanisms during dry weather are potentially important for marsh stability. We calculated tidal creek sediment fluxes within a highly modified, sediment-starved, 1.5-km2 salt marsh (Seal Beach) and a less modified 1-km2 marsh (Mugu) with fluvial sediment supply.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Website with project description, access to data, Building Commons Knowledge webinar discussions, and Public Presentations.

These archives are intended to support the research of the marine fog science community and others interested in fog science research results. The archives are divided into two sections:

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Water-Wildlife Hotspots: Areas where changes in water availability (recharge plus runoff) and loss of critical habitat coincide. These maps display percent change in water availability relative to the 1981-2010 climate period where 5% or more of watershed area has lost critical habitat. Water availability is defined as recharge plus runoff.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This business plan provides the rationale for developing an Environmental Change Network for the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative. This plan will illustrate important potential uses of the network and its data and show how these uses will increase the efficiency and efficacy of adaptation planning and implementation efforts. We will demonstrate how the value of the network will be greater if implemented sooner.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This September, 2014 article in the Orange County Register highlights the project "Sea-level rise modeling across the California salt marsh gradient".

Date posted: June 23, 2018

These materials, most of which are in PDF format, are a record of what members of the Pacific Coastal Fog Project have presented at various scientific and public meetings. They range from slide shows given during technical sessions at scientific conferences, to presentations delivered to potential funders and talks to the general public interested in the subject of coastal marine fog. These presentations and posters, like the WebEx recordings, are also documents of the process of creating common knowledge.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Marsh accretion was modeled by ESA PWA using the Marsh-98 model, described here. The model assumes that rates of marsh plain elevation change depend on the availability of suspended sediment and organic material, water depth, and duration of inundation periods. If enough suspended sediment is available, then tidal marsh elevations can keep pace with increased inundation.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

In a rapidly changing climate, effective bird conservation requires not only reliable information about the current vulnerability of species of conservation concern, but also credible projections of their future vulnerability. Such projections may enable managers to preempt or reduce emerging climate-related threats through appropriate habitat management. We used NatureServe’s Climate Change Vulnerability Index (CCVI) to predict vulnerability to climate change of 168 bird species that breed in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California, USA.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

CalWeedMapper is an online tool that provides maps of 210 invasive plants from the California Invasive Plant Inventory, as well as maps of suitable range in 2010 and 2050 climate for 79 species. CalWeedMapper also provides users the ability to generate reports of recommended eradication, surveillance, and containment targets based on the user's selected area.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Coastal areas are high-risk zones subject to the impacts of global climate change, with significant increases in the frequencies of extreme weather and storm events, and sea-level rise forecast by 2100. These physical processes are expected to alter estuaries, resulting in loss of intertidal wetlands and their component wildlife species. In particular, impacts to salt marshes and their wildlife will vary both temporally and spatially and may be irreversible and severe.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Climate Commons is the California LCC's starting point for discovery of climate change data and related resources, information about the science that produced it, and guidance for applying climate change science to conservation in California. One of the services the Commons offers is a collection of articles introducing and explaining key concepts relating to climate change and conservation in California, helping resource managers get up to speed with this science and find important resources that they need to incorporate climate science into their conservation planning.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This set of elevation models was developed to understand current (2010) conditions of San Francisco salt marshes and for input into sea-level rise prediction models. These elevation models were built by interpolating surveyed elevation points. The elevation surveys were conducted with a Leica RX1230 Real-Time Kinematic GPS which is capable of

Date posted: June 23, 2018

We developed and delivered a training curriculum for two courses in species distribution modeling
that included sample data, multimedia, and module lesson plans. Target audiences will be planners, managers, and technical analysts (GIS Specialists). Final course content and curriculum are available
through partner websites and the California Climate Commons.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

We conducted detailed resurveys of a montane mammal, Urocitellus beldingi, to examine the effects of climate change on persistence along the trailing edge of its range. Of 74 California sites where U. beldingi were historically recorded (1902–1966), 42 per cent were extirpated, with no evidence for colonization of previously unoccupied sites. Increases in both precipitation and temperature predicted site extirpations, potentially owing to snowcover loss. Surprisingly, human land-use change buffered climate change impacts, leading to increased persistence and abundance.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

BayGEO Journal Article by Alicia Torregrosa explaining the challenges of mapping fog and the techniques used to create the Fog and Low Cloud Cover map generated from GOES imagery. Karl the Fog is a twitter handle @KarlTheFog for fog watchers.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The vulnerability of species at risk from climate change is recognized as an important issue in California as well as globally. Assessing vulnerability requires information on the long-term viability of populations and understanding the influences on that viability, due to environmental drivers as well as impacts of management action. We developed population-dynamic models to assess and better understand the long-term population viability of four key, tidal marsh-dependent species, under a variety of environmental conditions, including climate change impacts.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This vulnerability assessment is an initial science-based effort to identify how and why focal resources (ecosystems, species populations, and ecosystem services) across the Sierra Nevada region are likely to be affected by future climate conditions. This assessment centers on the Sierra Nevada region of California, from foothills to crests, including ten national forests and two national parks. Twenty‐seven focal resources including eight ecosystems, populations of fifteen species, and four ecosystem services were identified as important by the U.S.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

An online decision support tool for managers, planners, conservation practitioners and scientists.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

List of coastal wetland archetypes with additional information on hydrology and related functions and other issues that may affect management decisions Audience: WRP Partner Agencies and stakeholders, and other resource managers throughout Southern California.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Distribution maps of ensemble averages and standard deviations for each species modeled future bioclimatic envelope. These maps demonstrate the diversity of projections from the array of modeled studied by the project. Consists of 200 layers: 100 species (50 bird, 50 plant) 2 stats (avg, std) value is 0..1 suitability.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

An online decision support tool for managers, planners, conservation practitioners and scientists.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Each of full climate models (excluding vegetation and elevation variables for which there were no future projections) were subsequently projected onto predicted future climate layers from the IPCC 4th Assessment Report A1B climate change scenario for the decades 2050-2060 and 2080-2090. These predictions represent conservative efforts, however, as the predictions of atmospheric CO2 concentrations may be reached much sooner, as current emissions already exceed the trajectories of the highest scenarios.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Sediment and levee data were generated and added to the SLR tool. We decided to measure sediment because there was no viable data. The estimated data used in the tool is the best there is, and there was field data collected to validate it. Available in the Stralberg paper in a table, and zip of shapefiles also attached here.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Coastal land managers are faced with many challenges and uncertainties in planning adaptive strategies for conserving coastal ecosystems under future climate change scenarios. As transitional ecotones between the marine and terrestrial environment, nearshore habitats are particularly sensitive to climate change. Projected climate change effects on coastal environments include sea-level rise, changing storm magnitude and frequency, salt water intrusion, accelerated erosion, shifting mudflat profiles, and increased water temperature and acidity (Huppert et al. 2009).

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This dataset was developed from fieldwork completed in the winter, spring, and summer of 2016-2017 at the Regional Scale across public and private lands in the San Joaquin Valley. This data is embargoed until manuscript publication, and sensitive due to containing locations of endangered species.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The California tiger salamander (Ambystoma californiense; hereafter, CTS) is classified as a federally threatened species (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 2004). Consequently, much research has been done to provide information for its management and conservation. However, previous research has primarily focused on the use of upland, terrestrial environments by CTS (Trenham and Shaffer 2005), the demography of populations (Trenham et al. 2001), and the effects of hybridization between CTS and the introduced, barred tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum mavortium; Johnson et al. 2013).

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Sacramento Valley of California is a site of international importance for shorebirds despite having lost >90% of its historic wetlands. Currently both managed wetlands and flooded agriculture are important habitats for shorebird populations, but the extent of flooded agriculture may be declining in early winter when shorebirds need to acquire resources postmigration to survive winter.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Climate change is predicted to alter aquatic habitats to the extent that many imperiled salmon and trout species (salmonids; Oncorhynchus spp.) face an escalating threat of extinction in California. This dissertation examines the impacts of climate change on salmonids from the Klamath River basin, the second largest river system in California, and now most likely the primary producer of wild salmonids in the state.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Species richness indicates the number of different species predicted to be able to occur at a location. Maps show the projected species richness under current climate and two models of future climate conditions. Species richness is calculated by converting the predictions from maxent models into binary maps of presence and absence and summing the maps across all species. Higher values in the maps indicate where more bird species are projected to be able to occur.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Indian Valley sits atop the Sierra Crest, 30 miles south of Lake Tahoe. The 250 acre meadow was once a
high-elevation sponge that soaked up spring snowmelt and slowly released water throughout the
summer. However, historic overgrazing caused erosion and downcutting of the stream channel and
formed a network of gullies that quickly drained water from the meadow. In 2012, a partnership that
included the US Forest Service, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Coca Cola and American Rivers

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Supplement to article "Climate-Driven Geomorphic Alteration of Intertidal Habitats for Foraging Migratory Birds in the San Francisco Bay Estuary; A California Landscape Conservation Cooperative Project". Additional information regarding sampling methodology and habitat modeling of
diving ducks.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Change in the percentage of watershed area with critical habitat from 2010 to a future time period These maps display the change in the proportion of watershed area that contains critical habitat from 2010 to a future time period for three IPCC-SRES scenarios – A1B, A2 and B1. Future time periods displayed include 2040, 2070 and 2100. Watershed boundaries are from the 8-digit Watershed Boundary Dataset (http://water.usgs.gov/GIS/huc.html).

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Center for Watershed Sciences and the Information Center for the Environment, in cooperation with affiliated organizations throughout the Sierra Nevada, are in the process of building and maintaining this data clearinghouse to support the National Fish & Wildlife Foundation meadow initiative.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This insert into the March 2014 Estuary news offers snapshots of how seven CA LCC projects have been laying the foundations for lasting cooperative conservation partnerships. The CA LCC has been striving to ensure that its projects complete research and make it accessible to resource managers – through publications, maps, the Climate Commons web site, workshops, webinars, and more. The CA LCC also completed a five-year strategic plan and science management framework in 2013.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Sacramento Valley of California is a site of international importance for shorebirds despite having lost >90% of its historic wetlands. Currently both managed wetlands and flooded agriculture are important habitats for shorebird populations, but the extent of flooded agriculture may be declining in early winter when shorebirds need to acquire resources postmigration to survive winter.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The objective of this review is to discuss physical processes over a wide range of spatial scales that govern the formation, evolution, and dissipation of marine fog. We consider marine fog as the collective combination of fog over the open sea along with coastal sea fog and coastal land fog. The review includes a history of sea fog research, field programs, forecasting methods, and detection of sea fog via satellite observations where similarity in radiative properties of fog top and the underlying sea induce further complexity.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

EcoAdapt, in collaboration with the U.S. Forest Service and California Landscape Conservation Cooperative (CA LCC) hosted the Adaptation Planning Workshop for the Sierra Nevada in June 2013 in Sacramento, California. The goal of the workshop was to identify management strategies that will help regionally important ecosystems and species adapt to changing climate conditions and to lay the groundwork for adaptation action. Thirty-two attendees representing 21 public agencies (including national forests), non-governmental organizations, and others participated in the workshop.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

A collection of information resources assembled to support the CVLCP partnership efforts, including scenario planning, assessing vulnerabilities, and developing adaptation strategies.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Project Goal

The Goal of the Central Valley Landscape Conservation Project is to identify climate-smart conservation actions in partnership with scientists and natural resource managers that will maximize the adaptive capacity of priority species, habitats, and ecosystems to support an ecologically connected Central Valley landscape.

Project Objectives

Date posted: June 23, 2018

A collection of spatial data resources assembled to support the CVLCP partnership efforts, including scenario planning, assessing vulnerabilities, and developing adaptation strategies.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This technical report presents PRBO Conservation Science's (now called Point Blue Conservation Science) development of scenarios of climate change impacts on tidal marsh vegetation and bird species from 2010-2110 based on low or high rates of sea level rise (0.52 or 1.65 m in 100 yr) and low or high suspended sediment availability.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Central Valley of California is one of the most important regions for wintering waterbirds in North America despite extensive anthropogenic landscape modification and decline of historical wetlands there. Like many other mediterranean-climate ecosystems across the globe, the Central Valley has been subject to a burgeoning human population and expansion and intensification of agricultural and urban development that have impacted wildlife habitats.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The amount and quality of natural resources available for terrestrial and aquatic wildlife habitats are expected to decrease throughout the world in areas that are intensively managed for urban and agricultural uses. Changes in climate and management of increasingly limited water supplies may further impact water resources essential for sustaining habitats. In this report, we document adapting a Water Evaluation and Planning (WEAP) system model for the Central Valley of California.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

We sampled 187 adult or sub-adult Belding’s ground squirrels at 15 sites across California from Modoc County to the southern Sierra Nevada from 2003 to 2011, with the majority of samples obtained in 2010 and 2011. Ground squirrels were trapped in Sherman or Tomahawk Live Traps. Genetic samples were collected through an ear snip or from a liver biopsy during preparation of museum skins. DNA was extracted using standard methods and amplified using ten polymorphic microsatellite loci optimized from protocols developed based on other sciurid species.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This guidance document and webinar provide information about the CA LCC method for creating and updating a Data Management Plan for CA LCC-funded projects. A Data Management Plan is a document that describes the data produced by a project and the way those resources will be stored, documented, and if and how they will be shared for use by others. Data Management Plans are required of all CA LCC-funded projects.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The goal of the North-central California Coast and Ocean Climate-Smart Adaptation Project is to collaboratively develop and implement adaptation actions in response to, and in preparation for, climate change impacts on habitats, species and ecosystem services (termed focal resources). Vulnerability to climate and non-climate stressors was assessed for select focal resources in the region during Phase 1 of the project through two decision-support workshops.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

In 2006, the Century Commission for a Sustainable Florida called for an identification of those lands and waters in the state that are critical to the conservation of Florida's natural resources. In response, the Florida Natural Areas Inventory, University of Florida Center for Landscape Conservation Planning, and Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission collaborated to produce CLIP - the Critical Lands and Waters Identification Project. CLIP is now being used to inform planning decisions by the Peninsular Florida Landscape Conservation Cooperative, coordinated by the U.S.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

In 2006, the Century Commission for a Sustainable Florida called for an identification of those lands and waters in the state that are critical to the conservation of Florida's natural resources. In response, the Florida Natural Areas Inventory, University of Florida Center for Landscape Conservation Planning, and Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission collaborated to produce CLIP - the Critical Lands and Waters Identification Project.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Standards for project metadata and support documentation for the 22 LCCs to create the metadata were developed by the CA LCC Data Managers under contract by the LCC National Office as part of the effort to create the Simple National Project Catalog database. The resulting database provided a single national source for information to date on all projects funded by the 22 individual LCCs and the national office, and a tool for reviewing these projects, for purposes of national-level management and presenting summaries of this information to Congress.

Date posted: June 23, 2018