Resources

LCCs have produced a wealth of informational documents, reports, fact sheets, webinars and more to help support resource managers in designing and delivering conservation at landscape scales.

The Crown Managers Partnership is developing a monitoring program that is intended to support the long-term health of the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem (CCE) and provide a scientifically credible foundation for managers to engage in natural resource protection activities. The monitoring strategy will focus on the development and acquisition of geospatial datasets from remote sensing and other GIS sources designed to track changes in habitats and human footprint consistently and reliably across the CCE. This information can then:

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Presentation Slideshow: Baseline for Monitoring Landcover document.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

This dataset represents the railways within a 5km buffer of the Crown of the Continent Ecosytem. This dataset contains all freely available spatial information on railways within the Crown of the Continent. Due to the free nature of the data, it is of mixed quality and should not necessarily be considered an exhaustive representaion.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Various documents of the 2014 CMP Forum: Managing for Climate Change in the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem

Date posted: February 7, 2019

The Crown of the Continent Ecosystem,with Glacier National Park, Montana,and Waterton Lakes National Park, Alberta, at its center, is one of North America’s most remarkable landscapes. Here, where open prairies meet the Rocky Mountains, some of the world’s most pristine freshwater ecosystems remain intact. Many North American watersheds originate in the Crown’s 28,000 square miles (72,000 km2), contributing to life-sustaining resources throughout much of North America. Access to cold, clean water supports ranching, farming, recreation, and wildlife in the Crown.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

CCE Synthesized Net Primary Productivity Data

Date posted: February 7, 2019

This layer represents the roads for the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem. The data are a compilation from multiple sources.

Credits: Agriculture (U.S.D.A.) Forest Service Region 1 National Forests, Department of Administration - Montana Transportation Framework, Government of Alberta - Sustainable Resource Development (SRD), Foothills Research Insitute and the Digital Road Atlas (DRA) of British Colombia. This dataset was compiled through efforts of Alberta Sustainable Resource Development regional staff as well as the Foothills Research Institute.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

CCE Synthesized Watershed Data

Date posted: February 7, 2019

This dataset contains a seamless 1:1,000,000 scale British Columbia, Alberta and Montana lakes layer.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

These case study sites are detailed in the report accompanying this data layer. The case studies are intended to serve as examples of how some of the opportunities for diverse stakeholders to engage in the process of mitigating road impacts on wildlife that are described in the report might be applied on the ground, as well as other considerations that come into play in selecting sites for possible mitigation and designing mitigation solutions for those sites.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

To provide information on what areas have a groupings of dead (red) pine trees which indicate a high likelyhood of green attack mountain pine beetle trees. This data is used to help focus ground survey work and is not 100% accurate. The current beetle year (August 15 to August 15) Mountain Pine Beetle aerial survey red tree locations. This data is used to help focus ground survey work and is not 100% accurate.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Carnivore carcasses recorded by Montana Department of Transportation, Idaho Department of Fish & Game, and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service were aggregated to the nearest mile marker for major roads of the U.S. Northern Rockies. Note that wildlife carcass collection and reporting protocols and frequency differ between states and among maintenance sections within states. Carcass presence should therefore be used only to explore general patterns and not for statistical inference.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Wildlife carcasses recorded by Montana Department of Transportation, Idaho Department of Fish & Game, and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service were aggregated to the nearest mile marker for major roads of the U.S. Northern Rockies. WGA connectivity flowlines were intersected with the road network and attributed to the nearest mile marker, along with their connectivity ranking, which indicates their expected relative importance to maintaining westwide connectivity.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Wildlife carcasses recorded by Montana Department of Transportation, Idaho Department of Fish & Game, and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service were aggregated to the nearest mile marker for major roads of the U.S. Northern Rockies. WGA connectivity flowlines were intersected with the road network and attributed to the nearest mile marker, along with their connectivity ranking, which indicates their expected relative importance to maintaining westwide connectivity.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

This layer represents the major road network of the U.S. Northern Rockies. It was created by merging Montana Department of Transportation "on-system" routes with Idaho Transportation Department "state highway system" routes, creating consistent attribute fields, then clipping to the U.S. Northern Rockies study area boundary.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

The study area was defined so as to span the Crown of the Continent, Salmon-Selway, and Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, and was delineated based on EPA Ecoregions as described in the Processing Steps.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

This layer represents 5-year relative counts of wildlife carcasses collected by Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) personnel (2008-2012) or reported by the general public (2012) on or adjacent to state highway system (major) routes. To obtain relative counts, the 5-year total counts per mile, which included all wildlife species observed, were divided by the maximum observed calue (98) to give a relative 0-1 risk score.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

This layer represents 5-year relative counts of wildlife carcasses collected by Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) maintenance personnel or U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Grizzly Bear Recovery Team personnel on or adjacent to on-system (major) routes from 2008 to 2012. To obtain relative counts, the 5-year total counts per mile, which included all wildlife species observed, were divided by the maximum observed calue (98) to give a relative 0-1 risk score.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

This layer represents the mile markers along the major road network of the U.S. Northern Rockies. It was created by merging Montana Department of Transportation "on-system" routes with Idaho Transportation Department "state highway system" routes, creating consistent attribute fields, then clipping to the U.S. Northern Rockies study area boundary.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

In this project, the Sonoran Institute, Center for Large Landscape Conservation, Montana State University’s Western Transportation Institute (WTI) and Future West investigated the potential impacts of future housing development on transportation to determine where increased traffic volumes will most likely impact connectivity for carnivores. The focus of this pilot study was Flathead and Lincoln counties in northwestern Montana.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Resources available to conserve native trout are limited and must be targeted where conservation is most critical and likely to be successful. Using a grant from the GNLCC we collaborated with an Interagency Multi-State Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout (YCT) Conservation Work Group to prioritize conservation across the range of YCT. This prioritization will target national resources to critical conservation needs. We developed and applied a set of ecological and opportunity-based conservation criteria using the experience and knowledge of field managers.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

The Heart of the Rockies Initiative focuses its efforts on a region from southern Alberta and British Columbia to western Wyoming - the Central Rockies of North America. Within our working region are three distinct planning regions. The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) is the southernmost area and surrounds Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, including parts of Wyoming, Idaho and Montana. The High Divide straddles the continental divide in Idaho and Montana.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

This map displays the HOTR conservation partners conservation accomplishments between 2004 and 2013.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Heart of the Rockies service area encompasing service area of all conservation partners.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

These documents, prepared by Sonia A. Hall and the Arid Lands Initiative (ALI) Core Team, articulate the shared biological, strategic, and spatial priorities of the ALI in the Columbia Plateau Ecoregion.

Excerpt from the executive summary:

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Date posted: February 7, 2019

Hosted By: GNLCC and NWCC Sage-Grouse Research Collaborative

Summary: The webinar will feature two presentations from the two active research projects being overseen by the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative Sage-Grouse Research Collaborative.

Presentation 1: “Short-Term Impacts to Greater Sage-Grouse from Wind Energy Development”

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Website: Heart of the Rockies Initiative

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Agenda for Priority Area vetting

Date posted: February 7, 2019

This project is part of a larger effort to design a sustainable landscape for wildlife and ecological systems in the Columbia Plateau ecoregion.  Another goal of this effort is to test and describe different approaches to doing “Landscape Conservation Design” (LCD) and working towards articulating a toolkit of approaches for LCD.  This report documents a task related to further develop and testing of this toolkit as applied to priority areas in the Columbia Plateau). This project focuses on a rapid assessment method of several potential areas across a large landscape.  

Date posted: February 7, 2019

This Esri file geodatabase contains the Arid Lands Initiative's Priority Core Areas (PCAs) and Priority Linkage Areas (PLAs). For all PCAs and PLAs over 5,000 acres in size, we developed a "scorecard" that presents its rank, relative to the other PLAs, for a range of threats and values.  Both the raw, continuous values and the ranks are available in the attributes of these feature classes. Details about each field are provided in the fields metadata section. The citations in the fields metadata can all be found in the references section of the Phase 2 final report, available

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Project Workshop Presentations Webpage: Understanding and Adapting To Climate Change in Aquatic Ecosystems at Landscape and River Basin Scales...

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Project Workshop Webpage: Understanding and Adapting To Climate Change in Aquatic Ecosystems at Landscape and River Basin Scales...

Date posted: February 7, 2019

These are the Python scripts used to create the scorecards for the Phase 2 report. They are primarily provided for reference, and require library installation and several local files to run properly. If anyone is interested in running a modeified version of these scripts for a similar purpose, please contact Madeline Steele (madeline_steele@fws.gov). One script makes map PNGs from an ArcMap mxd with styling that varies with scale, and the other pulls these maps and other information together to create the scorecard PDFs.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

After identifying collaborative conservation priority areas (see this report for details), the Arid Lands Initiative needed to assess the relative climate change vulnerability of these areas to better understand what management strategies might be most appropriate in each. This Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment (CCVA) for the ALI's Priority Core Areas (PCAs) is fully described in this report.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Boundary of the study area and HUC Basins within the project area for the ALI Riverine Assessment Project.

HUC Basin Data from Sandra Thiel--Idaho Department of Water Resources

Date posted: February 7, 2019
This is a set of scripts developed by Madeline Steele in 2013 as a part of the Arid Lands Initiative (ALI) spatial prioritization analysis. They are provided here both as methodological documentation and because they may be useful for other projects. They are not set up to be imported into an ArcGIS toolbox, and all path names would have to be changed before they could be used. They are commented, and variables should be at the top, but they are probably not very useful without a bit of previous Python experience.
 
Date posted: February 7, 2019

These photos were taken by the Washinton Natural Heritage Program in Summer, 2014 to support an Ecological Integrity Assessment project (https://www.sciencebase.gov/catalog/item/54ed0f13e4b02d776a68481b).  Photos are taken of field sampling sites that were selected to assess ecological integrity.  Methods can be found in the report.  Each zipped folder contains several photo series that correspond to individual sites.  Each site series starts with a photo of a field sheet with the site ID.

Date posted: February 7, 2019
Date posted: February 7, 2019

The Pacific Region National Wildlife Refuge System developed a strategic approach to identify region-wide land/habitat conservation priorities. This approach was piloted in the Columbia Plateau Ecoregion and resulted in a high-level landscape-scale conservation design. Working closely with conservation partners in the region, we developed a data management and analysis model that builds from existing data sets and can be shared easily with other partners.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

In 2014 and 2015, the Arid Lands Initiative developed “Conservation Scorecards” for their Priority Core Areas (PCAs) and Priority Linkage Areas (PLAs).

Date posted: February 7, 2019
This geodatabase contains the ALI Marxan 500-acre hexagons, which have fields representing all Marxan targets. An analysis area footprint is also included.
Date posted: February 7, 2019

This zipped folder includes a file geodatabase that contains the spatial data sets gathered for the second phase of the Arid Land Initiative's Landscape Conservation Design activity in the Columbia Plateau Ecoregion, as well as an excel file with information about the Ecological Integrity Assessment (EIA) data variables. This analysis, which was funded by the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative, is fully described in the 2015 ALI report also available on ScienceBase, here.



Date posted: February 7, 2019

This project identifies priority areas in the Columbia Plateau Ecoregion to implement conservation strategies for riverine and riparian habitat. This is tailored towards the Arid Lands Initiative (ALI) conservation goals and objectives, and provides the foundation for adaptation to a changing climate. This project adopts a “zoned” approach to identifying focal areas, connectivity management zones and zones for riparian habitat and ecological representation. Through a series of workshops and webinars, the ALI articulated its freshwater conservation goals and targets.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

NatureServe Vista (Vista) is a free ArcGIS extension that was integrated into the project to support analysis in the project, as well as continued “as needed” implementation planning. Vista is a broad tool that could support the following tasks:

Date posted: February 7, 2019

This project builds from a body of work to support conservation planning and design for the Arid Lands Initiative (ALI) in the Columbia Plateau ecoregion. Previous work identified a suite of habitats and species along with their associated viability and stressors, as well as a portfolio of Priority Core Areas (PCAs) and high priority connectivity corridors. This previous work represents a design that, if realized, would improve protection of the current distributions of species, habitats, and connectivity corridors.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Determining species distributions accurately is crucial to developing conservation and management strategies for imperiled species, but a challenging task for small populations. We evaluated the efficacy of environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis for improving detection and thus potentially refining the known distribution of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Methow and Okanogan Subbasins of the Upper Columbia River, which span the border between Washington, USA and British Columbia, Canada.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Advancing land and resource conservation in the Rocky Mountains requires bringing together the wealth of existing organizations, partnerships, universities, and individuals.  By joining together, conservation practitioners can identify and advance common priorities, develop strategies and gain efficiencies in addressing landscape stressors such as climate change,

invasive species and land development, and understand the eco-­‐geographic context of local management activities and decisions on regional outcomes.  Partnerships are needed to identify and

Date posted: February 7, 2019

This project was initially envisioned as an approach to identify priority areas for the National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS) in the Columbia Plateau ecoregion. It quickly became clear that working in a partnership-based setting would lead to a more holistic conservation design in the region, and NWRS priorities would follow from that design. Therefore, we aligned this project with an existing conservation partnership in the region, the Arid Lands Initiative (ALI).

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Incorporating Climate Change Adaptation into Grizzly Bear Connectivity Restoration - Jeff Burrell

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Understanding Fire Refugia and Their Importance to Conservation

Date posted: February 7, 2019