Resources

LCCs have produced a wealth of informational documents, reports, fact sheets, webinars and more to help support resource managers in designing and delivering conservation at landscape scales.

This presentation details the LCC's effort to develop a draft regional conservation plan for the Cooperative using an interactive and iterative spatial prioritization framework.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Conservation planning is concerned with spatially identifying and prioritizing lands and waters important for functioning ecosystems and biodiversity. It is a science utilizing geographic information systems and large datasets to generate scenario-based maps of conservation potential. These scenarios can balance social, economic, and regulatory constraints with processes that occur over time and space. The planning process itself, as well as final products, helps practitioners prioritize where and when to take conservation action.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Appalachian NatureScape study identified five highly essential conservation design elements; regional cores, local cores, regional connectors, local connectors, and other important areas.

Regionally connected cores are the largest of the design elements. They are broad areas of regional significance that have high internal landscape connectivity. There were 5 regional cores that were identified. In addition to regional cores, there were eight locally connected cores. These areas are locally significant (irreplaceable) and also have high internal local connectivity.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

2015 Scientific Reports Related to this Collaboration with Clemson University. Robert F. Baldwin, Paul B. Leonard. PLoS ONE10(10): Published: October 14, 2015

Date posted: June 23, 2018

2017. Scientific Reports Related to this Collaboration with Clemson University. Paul B. Leonard, Robert F. Baldwin & R. Daniel Hanks.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Landscape conservation cooperatives (LCCs) are conservation-science partnerships between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and other federal agencies, states, tribes, NGOs, universities and stakeholders within a geographically defined area. They inform resource management decisions to address national-scale stressors, including habitat fragmentation, genetic isolation, spread of invasive species, and water scarcity, all of which are accelerated by climate change. This dataset represents the geographic boundary of the Appalachian LCC.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This dataset depicts the number of dams/100 km of river.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The objective of this project was to develop some basic stream classification attributes for the entire Southeast Aquatic Resources Partnership (SARP) region and to provide more detailed attributes in the eastern section of the SARP geography (9 states: AL, FL, GA, KY, NC, SC, TN, WV, VA) where additional data and modeling capacity was available. The final product is a mapped dataset of information linked to the NHDPlus medium resolution hydrography that can be used to classify stream reaches.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This shapefile represents The Nature Conservancy's (TNC) "essential forests" and "key connectors" in the Central Appalachians Whole System. Essential Forests are built around groups of large forest patches, ecoregional portfolio roll-up sites, and areas with high local integrity and high flow density (from M. Anderson's resiliency analysis). Key Connectors provide physical linkages among essential forests, have high flow density, and may also include large forest patches and matrix blocks.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Appalachian Mountains provide a multitude of habitats that are essential for hundreds of breeding, migrant, and wintering bird species. Its rugged terrain is dominated by forest and woodlands that span 15 states and contain several major eastern rivers that are heavily relied upon by waterfowl. But historical and current land-use changes, environmental disturbances, and other factors are resulting in population declines of more than 1/3 of bird species that breed and winter in the region.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This dataset depicts the percentage of mean annual flow (%MAF) stored in upstream dams in the Appalachian LCC region to view suggested thresholds for an assessment of aquatic habitat condition for the Landscape Conservation Design (LCD).

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Appalachian LCC Conservation Planning Atlas (CPA) is a platform for data discovery, sharing and collaboration for stakeholders throughout the Appalachian LCC region. With the CPA you can search for spatial datasets, visualize LCC-supported projects, and learn more about conservation science and design in the region.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

These datasets are products of Phase II of the Appalachian Landscape Conservation Cooperative's (LCC) landscape conservation design (LCD) created by Clemson University as part of the LCC-funded project, "Interactive Conservation Planning for the Appalachian LCC".

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Aquatic Planning Units are derived from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Hydrography Dataset (NHD)+ v. 2 catchments. They contain information used throughout the NatureScape (landscape conservation design) development. The tables include summaries of information within each catchment including predictor variables. See SI.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Forest cores are derived by applying an inverse buffer (-100m) to forest patches to represent the area of contiguous interior forest habitat. Forest patches are defined as areas of contiguous natural cover bound by non-natural edge or linear fragmenting features (roads, railroads, transmission lines, natural gas pipelines). The following land cover types were selected from the 2006 National Land Cover Database (NLCD) to define “natural cover”: deciduous forest, coniferous forest, mixed [deciduous-coniferous] forest, scrub-shrub, woody wetland, and emergent wetland.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Aquatic connectivity was modeled across the entire Landscape Conservation Cooperative geography at the catchment
and watershed scales. To evaluate aquatic connectivity, the density of dams and road crossings was used as these are
known to disrupt connectivity within aquatic systems. Connectivity data for dams and road crossings were
created from the StreamCat database. The density of dams and roads was multiplied, at the catchment and watershed

Date posted: June 23, 2018

All Conservation Design Elements identified through a multi-year conservation planning effort undertaken by the Appalachian Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC). These elements were identified by the program Marxan as meeting collective conservation targets. Datasets include a merged design of all five elements, individual element shapefiles, and a prioritization shapefile (Conservation Design elements outlined by the NatureScape Design that were then placed into a prioritization framework based on Margulis and Pressy 2000).

Date posted: June 23, 2018

August 15-16, 2017 Tennessee Aquarium, Chattanooga, TN Post-Meeting Summary

Date posted: June 23, 2018

These datasets represent the aquatic conservation projects within the Tennessee River Basin and include Tennessee River Basin Network and National Fish Hatchery Partnership projects.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This dataset represents the aquatic conservation projects within the Upper Tennessee River Basin generalized by Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC) 8 watershed. The information was obtained at the first annual meeting of the Upper Tennessee Imperiled Aquatic Species Strategy in 2016.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Across the Tennessee River Basin is a collaboration within the Appalachian LCC bringing together multiple agencies and stakeholders in a joint effort to plan and deliver landscape conservation actions to protect one of the most diverse areas for aquatic species in North America. This map displays the Tennessee River Basin Network's conservation project locations with information about each project and shows how many conservation projects occur in each watershed within the Tennessee River Basin.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Find here the Agenda and recorded Webinar from the June 29th Quarterly TRBN call

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Find here the agendas, notes, and presentations associated with the 2017 March TRBN Quarterly Webinar

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Find here the agendas, notes, and presentations associated with the November 2016 TRBN Quarterly Webinar

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Jessica Rhodes, Appalachian LCC GIS Analyst, explains how managers and researchers can tailor the decision support tool to their own specific needs and priority areas and resources. A web viewer built in combination with the tool also allows users to visualize GIS data layers pertinent to elevation and land cover of the landscape, locations of dams and gas wells, and data pertaining to the presence of cold-water dependent species such as Eastern Brook Trout.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

A classification system and map was developed for stream and river systems in the Appalachian LCC region, encompassing parts of 17 states. The product is intended to complement state-based stream classifications by unifying them into a single consistent system that represents the region’s natural flowing aquatic habitats. The results can be used to understand ecological flow relationships and inform conservation planning for aquatic biodiversity in the region.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Among a host of other critical ecosystem functions, intact riparian forests can help to reduce vulnerability of coldwater stream habitats to warming regional temperatures. Restoring and conserving these forests can therefore be an important part of regional and landscape-scale conservation plans, but managers need science and decision-support tools to help determine when these actions will be most effective.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Stream habitats for this project were classified using six primary attributes: size, gradient, temperature, hydrology, buffering capacity, and confinement.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The product is intended to complement state-based stream classifications by unifying them into a single consistent system that represents the region’s natural flowing-water aquatic habitats. The results can be used to understand ecological flow relationships and inform conservation planning for aquatic biodiversity in the region.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This study developed a mapped classification system for stream and river systems in the Appalachian LCC region to inform conservation planning for aquatic biodiversity. Stream habitats were classified using six primary attributes: size, gradient, temperature, hydrology, buffering capacity, and confinement. Information on each variable was based on extensive data compiled or modeled. Variable classes were then combined to yield a regional taxonomy.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The classification unifies existing geomorphic and hydrologic classifications that occur within the LCC. It represents aquatic habitat types across this region in a manner that is appropriate and useful for building ecological flow ecology relationships and other conservation planning tools.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Developing consistent region-wide information to ensure enough water for people and wildlife.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Principal investigators at The Nature Conservancy developed a hierarchical classification system and map for stream and river systems for the Appalachian LCC that represents the region’s natural flowing-water aquatic habitats.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Identifying aquatic ecosystems requires a classification of stream and lake features into recognizable categories. Although a number of nationally recognized terrestrial community classifications exist, currently there is no national or international standard for classifying aquatic communities or ecosystems. Despite the lack of a national aquatic community classification, aquatic ecosystem classifications and frameworks have been developed at a variety of spatial scales to reflect the distribution of aquatic biological communities.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The tool works by identifying vulnerable stream and riverbanks that lack tree cover and shade in coldwater stream habitats. By locating the best spots to plant trees in riparian zones, resource managers can provide shade that limits the amount of solar radiation heating the water and reduces the impacts from climate change. This well-established management strategy will benefit high-elevation, cold-water aquatic communities.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Hexagon units with target layer information used by Clemson University in the Marxan analysis of the Appalachian Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC).

Date posted: June 23, 2018

An Important Bird and Biodiversity Area (IBA) is an area identified using an internationally agreed set of criteria as being globally important for the conservation of bird populations. In the United States the Program is administered by the National Audubon Society.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Efforts to model and predict long-term variations in climate, based on scientific understanding of climatological processes, have grown rapidly in their sophistication to the point that models can be used to develop reasonable expectations of regional climate change.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center has developed the Landscape Dynamics Assessment Tool (LanDAT) to help natural resource conservation practitioners monitor and assess impacts on changing landscapes and the ecological services and benefits they provide to people. LanDAT features a web-based map viewer that includes an annually-updated set of spatial data products as well as a website that provides a comprehensive overview of the tool and case studies of forest threats and their impacts to specific natural resources.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy, initiated in 2009 and finalized in 2014, provides a national vision for wildland fire management. This highly collaborative effort establishes three overarching goals, and describes stakeholder-driven processes for achieving them: (1) resilient landscapes; (2) fire-adapted communities; and (3) safe and effective wildfire response. The scientific rigor of this program was ensured with the establishment of the National Science and Analysis Team (NSAT).

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Systematic conservation planning is well suited to address the many large-scale biodiversity conservation challenges facing the Appalachian region. However, broad, well-connected landscapes will be required to sustain many of the natural resources important to this area into the future. If these landscapes are to be resilient to impending change, it will likely require an orchestrated and collaborative effort reaching across jurisdictional and political boundaries.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Regional Climate Centers (RCC) Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI: drought index). Recent 10-year climatology for drought in all months, 1950-1999.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Urban Influence measure developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Economic Research Service (ERS) identifies metropolitan counties by population size and outlines where natural area and urban boundaries exist. This can help to indicate where increased stresses on ecosystem services may occur.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Total Basal Area (BA) for all tree species is in square feet per acre.

To monitor the potential hazards posed by invasive pathogens, the U.S. Forest Service's Forest Health Technology Enterprise Team (FHTET) created a national database designed to assess the potential hazards on tree mortality and identify forest ecosystems at risk of invasive or pathogenic threats.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Forest Health Technology Enterprise Team (FHTET) was created by the Deputy Chief for State and Private Forestry in February 1995 to develop and deliver forest health technology services to field personnel in public and private organizations in support of the Forest Service's land ethic, to "promote the sustainability of ecosystems by ensuring their health, diversity, and productivity." This dataset shows the total basal area of all tree species as square feet per acre.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Systematic conservation planning is well suited to address the many large-scale biodiversity conservation challenges facing the Appalachian region. However, broad, well-connected landscapes will be required to sustain many of the natural resources important to this area into the future. If these landscapes are to be resilient to impending change, it will likely require an orchestrated and collaborative effort reaching across jurisdictional and political boundaries.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The American Community Survey (ACS) is a national, publicly available survey provided by the U.S. Census Bureau that collects information about population, education, housing, economic status, and more. Planners, public officials, entrepreneurs, and researchers rely on the data collected through this survey to help understand community conditions and to support community planning efforts.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Regional Climate Centers (RCC) Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI: drought index). Recent 10-year climatology for drought in summer months, 2005-2014.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Regional Climate Centers (RCC) Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI: drought index). Recent 10-year climatology for drought in winter months, 1950-1999.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Systematic conservation planning is well suited to address the many large-scale biodiversity conservation challenges facing the Appalachian region. However, broad, well-connected landscapes will be required to sustain many of the natural resources important to this area into the future. If these landscapes are to be resilient to impending change, it will likely require an orchestrated and collaborative effort reaching across jurisdictional and political boundaries.

Date posted: June 23, 2018