Resources

LCCs have produced a wealth of informational documents, reports, fact sheets, webinars and more to help support resource managers in designing and delivering conservation at landscape scales.

This spreadsheet contains the full results of climate change vulnerability assessments conducted in 2010 in Virgiinia.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Meadows are open grasslands where grass and other non-woody plants are the primary vegetation. With no tree coverage, meadows are typically open, sunny areas that attract flora and fauna that require both ample space and sunlight. These conditions allow for the growth of many wildflowers and are typically important ecosystems for pollinating insects. Marshlands are like meadows in that they typically have no tree coverage and host primarily grasses and woody plants. However, a defining characteristic of marshlands is their wetland features.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

New vulnerability assessments for 41 species and 3 habitats in the Appalachians now available.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

LanDAT webinar with Danny Lee of USFS

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Landscape Conservation Design and On-Line Conservation Planning Tool

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Forest/Woodland habitats describe large areas primarily dominated by trees, with moderate ground coverage, such as grasses and shrubs. Density, tree height, and land use may all vary, though woodland is typically used to describe lower density forests. A forest may have an open canopy, but a woodland must have an open canopy with enough sunlight to reach the ground and limited shade.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

A contract was executed between the AppLCC/WMI and Clemson University with the attached Scope of Work for a 1-year effort to conduct a data needs assessment for landscape planning in Appalachia.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This report provides the methods and results of 85 species vulnerability assessments in Pennsylvania.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Georgia Scenic Byways program (GDOT, 2017) is a “grassroots effort … to identify, preserve, promote and protect treasured corridors throughout the state.” There are fifteen such corridors designated by Georgia DOT, their only protection is a restriction on roadside billboards. Despite frequent avocation of the beauties of Georgia highways, there is no systematic articulation of the physical attributes of a scenic landscape, how such attributes would be identified and thus protected, nor the expertise or resources to devote to new discoveries.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Key Ecosystem Services table

Date posted: June 23, 2018

4th Quarter 2013 Progress report

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Request for Applications for the Energy Forecasts Project.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The goal of this project is to develop a hierarchical classification for stream and river systems within the Appalachian Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC). This classification system will identify and consistently map ecologically similar types of rivers and streams using a flexible hierarchical set of geomorphic and hydrologic variables deemed appropriate for classification by the participating states and relevant to the spatial scale of management.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

On January 14, Lesley Sneddon of NatureServe presented this webinar to interested conservation and cooperative partners of the Appalachian LCC to present the process for the selection of the 50-75 species and 3-5 habitats proposed for assessment of climate change vulnerability. The selections were informed by the wealth of assessments already completed in all or part of the LCC region to date. The meeting generated good discussion on the process, species, habitats, and possible avenues for future research.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Report for Task 1a

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This spreadsheet provides hyperlinks to additional information from NatureServe Explorer.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The entire stream classification dataset is available for download as a zip file.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Provides a general overview of the need for the Energy Assessment research, the major products and findings that came out of the project, and the relevance of the study, models, and tools to the resource management community.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The RPCCR is a web-based tool currently under development which is designed to allow managers to rapidly identify high-priority riparian restoration targets. The objective of this project is to complete development of the RPCCR, link it with the Appalachian LCC website, and integrate it with ongoing stream temperature monitoring and modeling efforts within the Northeast Climate Science Center (NECSC) and participating Landscape Conservation Cooperatives.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Landscape Conservation Design and On-Line Conservation Planning Tool

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This spreadsheet provides hyperlinks to additional information from NatureServe Explorer.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

December 5th, 2017 Appalachian LCC Conservation Fellow

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Report for 4th quarter 2013

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This spreadsheet provides results of the CCVI conducted on aquatic species of the full Research Region.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Review by Technical Oversight Team of 3rd Quarter 2013 report.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Forested Stream and/or Seepage Forested stream environments are typically found in the buffer zones between forested land and stream banks, often known as riparian zones. Stream headwaters and seepage areas occur where ground water percolates to the surface through muck, mossy rock, and nettles. It can also be found under rocks, among gravel, or cobble where water has begun to percolate in areas near open water. Breeding grounds are commonly found beneath mosses growing on rocks, on logs, or soil surfaces in these types of seepage areas.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Request for Applications for the Stream Classification Project

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Request for Applications for the Climate Change Vulnerability Project.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

TRB Fact Sheet

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Narrative comments for Climate Change Vulnerability project.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

In this study, we evaluate the climate change vulnerability of a subset of key species found in the Cumberland Piedmont Network (CUPN) of the National Park Service (NPS), an ecologically important and diverse region. We developed a list of species of conservation concern (globally and sub-nationally) within each of the fourteen NPS units in the CUPN.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

These results are a compilation of climate change vulnerability assessments in the northern-most portion of the LCC, covering the area from New York south to West Virginia and Virginia, west to Pennsylvania and eastern Ohio.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This pdf is a supplement to the report, Adapting Conservation to a Changing Climate: An Update to the Illinois Wildlife Action Plan. It contains the full results for species assessed for vulnerability to climate change using NatureServe's Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment (CCVI) tool.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

These results are a compilation of climate change vulnerability assessments in the western portion of the LCC, covering the area from Western Kentucky, northeastern Alabama and western Tennessee west to southern Indiana and southeastern Illinois.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

County distribution for the climate change vulnerability of 41 newly assessed species is available for download. The entire package is available at the link provided.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Appalachian LCC tasked NatureServe with a two-phase project that explores the understanding of climate change in the Appalachian landscape. The first phase focused on assembling a panel of experts to provide guidance on a) prioritizing species and habitats to assess for vulnerability to climate change; b) selecting approaches to conduct vulnerability assessments, and c) identifying appropriate climate data to use in the assessments.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

How should the Appalachian LCC acquire information about species and habitat vulnerability to large-scale impacts in the Appalachians? This report summarizes the findings and recommendations of a seven-member Expert Panel that sought to answer this question identified as a major research priority. The Panel addressed three aspects of the question: the selection of species and habitats to assess, approaches to vulnerability assessment, and the availability of downscaled climate data.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This spreadsheet provides the results of habitat assessments from five previous research projects. These include two projects in the Central Appalachian and Cumberland - Southern Appalachian portion of the LCC; habitat assessments completed in the North Carolina portion of the Cumberland - Southern Appalachian subregion; habitat assessments in the northeastern portion of the Central Appalachian subregion; and a draft assessment for a habitat in the Interior Low Plateau.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This report provides the methods and results of climate change vulnerability assessments of 119 species in New York.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This habitat is found primarily in the Interior Highlands of the Ozark, Ouachita, and Interior Low Plateau regions with scattered occurrences in northern Missouri. It occurs along moderate to steep slopes and steep valleys on primarily southerly to westerly facing slopes. Limestone and/or dolomite bedrock typify this system with shallow, moderately to well-drained soils interspersed with rocks. These soils often dry out during the summer and autumn, and then become saturated during the winter and spring.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies are dependent on the best available projections of how climate will change and impact a region’s natural and cultural resources. Understanding the vulnerability of various species and habitats within the Appalachian LCC to climate change is of critical importance. Identifying the most appropriate steps to acquire climate vulnerability information and then using this information to inform adaptation and mitigation strategies is a major research priority of the LCC.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Motivated by the need to rapidly assess the vulnerability of species to climate change, NatureServe developed a Climate Change Vulnerability Index. The Index uses a scoring system that integrates a species’ predicted exposure to climate change within an area and three sets of factors associated with climate change sensitivity, each supported by published studies: 1) indirect exposure to climate change, 2) species-specific sensitivity and adaptive capacity factors and 3) documented response to climate change.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This spreadsheet functions as a tool to determine climate change vulnerability of species. Information is entered in the calculator, and results are stored in the results tab. Explanations of climate change measures and species-specific attributes that contribute to adaptive capacity are in subsequent tabs. The documentation tab provides justification for ratings of each individual factor, with a complete list of references also provided in a separate tab. Also available for download below is the county distribution for 41 of the species evaluated.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This habitat was assessed in both the Cumberland - Southern Appalachian subregion and the Interior Low Plateau subregion. Results are in the first two tabs of the spreadsheet. A description of the habitat, and a list of associated species, is included in the description tab. The remaining tabs describe the individual factors and their definitions. These results are in the review stage.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This habitat of upland hardwood-dominated forests occurs in the Interior Low Plateau region of the southeastern United States along ridgetops and slopes of various aspects. The floristic expression of different stands included in this habitat varies considerably with aspect and soil type. Included here are a variety of associations ranging along a moisture gradient from submesic to drier ones. The submesic to dry-mesic expressions tend to be found on midslopes with northerly to easterly aspects, and the drier ones on southerly to westerly aspects and on broad ridges.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies are dependent on the best available projections of how climate will change and impact a region’s natural and cultural resources. Understanding the vulnerability of various species and habitats within the Appalachian LCC to climate change is of critical importance. Identifying the most appropriate steps to acquire climate vulnerability information and then using this information to inform adaptation and mitigation strategies is a major research priority of the LCC.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies are dependent on the best available projections of how climate will change and impact a region’s natural and cultural resources. Understanding the vulnerability of various species and habitats within the Appalachian LCC to climate change is of critical importance. Identifying the most appropriate steps to acquire climate vulnerability information and then using this information to inform adaptation and mitigation strategies is a major research priority of the LCC.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies are dependent on the best available projections of how climate will change and impact a region’s natural and cultural resources. Understanding the vulnerability of various species and habitats within the Appalachian LCC to climate change is of critical importance. Identifying the most appropriate steps to acquire climate vulnerability information and then using this information to inform adaptation and mitigation strategies is a major research priority of the LCC.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies are dependent on the best available projections of how climate will change and impact a region’s natural and cultural resources. Understanding the vulnerability of various species and habitats within the Appalachian LCC to climate change is of critical importance. Identifying the most appropriate steps to acquire climate vulnerability information and then using this information to inform adaptation and mitigation strategies is a major research priority of the LCC.

Date posted: June 23, 2018