Resources

LCCs have produced a wealth of informational documents, reports, fact sheets, webinars and more to help support resource managers in designing and delivering conservation at landscape scales.

The ease, efficiency, and sensitivity of environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling of species in aquatic environments is leading to an explosion in its use across North America. In this presentation, we describe eDNA sampling technology and share first year field results from the ongoing range-wide, eDNA-based inventory of bull trout in the northwestern U.S. during which ~3,000 sites were sampled by dozens of partner agencies.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

In May 2014, the GNLCC Steering Committee approved a pilot project to coordinate science-based management across the GNLCC on the connectivity goal. The SC allocated a total of $190k over 3 years. In the third year of the GNLCC Connectivity Project, with $75k support, work towards fulfilling the connectivity goal of the GNLCC fell into the following categories:

 

Date posted: February 8, 2019

USGS Greater Sage Grouse National Research Strategy | Sage Steppe Partner Forum Wiki

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Forecasting sagebrush ecosystem components and greater sage grouse habitat

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Introduction to the Sage Steppe Partner Forum Wiki

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Maximizing Minimums: Mapping basic requirements for greater sage-grouse

Date posted: February 8, 2019

This website provides Sage Steppe Partner Forum members forum information and a workspace for members to collaborate and contribute (ideas, news, project information, files, etc.) Features Include:

  • Partner contact information data entry
  • Contact information listings
  • News and update distribution
  • Date/time tracking
  • Document distribution
Date posted: February 8, 2019

Sage-grouse habitat and post-wildfire restoration in the Great Basin

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Sagebrush responses to shifting climate and fire disturbances

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Assessing land use practices in sagebrush and grassland ecosystems

Date posted: February 8, 2019
In recognition of the need to conserve a healthy sagebrush ecosystem to provide for the long-term conservation of its inhabitants, the US Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has made updates to the Conservation Efforts Database (CED), to serve as a tool designed to capture the unprecedented conservation efforts occurring within this ecosystem, not only for its most famous resident, the greater sage-grouse but for the other species that rely on sagebrush for all or part of its life.
Date posted: February 8, 2019

Web map available for public access and consumption.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

The Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation are a diverse people from many areas. We are the Kah-miltpah, Oche- Chotes, Palouse, Wenatchapam, Klickitat, Pesquose, See-ap-Cat, Yakama, Klinquit, Shyiks, Sk’in-pah, Kow-was-say-ee, Li-ay-was, and Wish-ham. Our tribes are strong and resilient people. We have lived on these lands for countless generations, from time immemorial. We will continue to flourish on our homelands for countless generations to come.

 

Date posted: February 8, 2019

The ability of landscapes to impede species’ movement or gene flow may be quantified by resistance models. These models form the basis of many connectivity analyses such as designing linkage networks, predicting impacts of future landscape change, and siting mitigation projects. Because empirical data is often unavailable or difficult to acquire, many resistance models are parameterized by expert opinion. Importantly, there has been little exploration of how expert parameterization of resistance models affects their ability to predict rates of movement and gene flow.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Washington Wildlife Habitat Connectivity Working Group (WHCWG). 2012. Washington Connected Landscapes Project: Analysis of the Columbia Plateau Ecoregion. Washington’s Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Department of Transportation, Olympia, WA.

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Washington Connectivity: Columbia Basin Final Connectivity MapPackages and/or ESRI Service Definition Files

Date posted: February 8, 2019

The Rocky Mountain Partner forum is one of four Partner Forums located in the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GNLCC) geography.  The GNLCC brings together managers and stakeholders from around this vast, 300 million-acre landscape to share information and work on mutual priorities. More information about the GNLCC can be found here.



Date posted: February 8, 2019

In this newsletter for the Great Northern LCC Rocky Mountain Partner Forum (RMPF), we're sharing updates on two regional projects: one focused on climate adaptation and cold water systems and the other investigating and facilitating landscape connectivity.  There are also two upcoming meetings and ways to share your work with the Partner Forum!



Date posted: February 8, 2019

The Rocky Mountain Partner Forum is one of four Partner Forums located in the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GNLCC) geography.  The GNLCC brings together managers and stakeholders from around this vast, 300 million-acre landscape to share information and work on mutual priorities. More information about the GNLCC can be found here.



Date posted: February 8, 2019

Spring has come to the Rockies and with it some recent meetings of collaboratives that are moving landscape conservation forward in the region.  In this installment of the Great Northern LLC Rocky Mountain Partner Forum newsletter we have updates on some recent collaborative meetings and the work they are planning for the future. 

Date posted: February 8, 2019

The Rocky Mountain Partner forum is one of four Partner Forums located in the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GNLCC) geography.  The GNLCC brings together managers and stakeholders from around this vast, 300 million-acre landscape to share information and work on mutual priorities. More information about the GNLCC can be found here.



Date posted: February 8, 2019

While winter is nearing its end, conservation efforts of our partners across the Rocky Mountain landscape of the Great Northern LCC are pushing forward. With major shifts in national policy, our local efforts are more important than ever.



Date posted: February 8, 2019

We wanted to notify the Rocky Mountain Partner Forum members that a revision has been made to this report. Please reference this version going forward. 



As a reminder, this report was a collaborative effort by the Wildlife Conservation Society, EcoAdapt, and The Center for Large Landscape Conservation. Authors Regan Nelson, Molly Cross, Lara Hansen and Gary Tabor worked with U.S. Forest Service managers at the Custer Gallatin National Forest to tailor the framework for decisions about native salmonid conservation. 


Date posted: February 8, 2019

As always, a variety of excellent work is being carried out across the Rocky Mountain landscape and we want to highlight some upcoming events, current projects, and relevant resources for Rocky Mountain Partner Forum members.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Columbia Plateau Phase 2 Focal Species Layer Packs (ESRI GIS Layerfiles) v10.1

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Frequently Asked Questions About Climate Projections - Amy Daniels

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Planning for Connectivity on National Forests Under 2012 Planning Rule

Date posted: February 8, 2019

The Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GNLCC) addresses landscape scale stressors across a large area of the northwest US and the Canadian west. The GNLCC supports several Partner Forums that span unique geographic sub-regions of the GNLCC (http://greatnorthernlcc.org/partner-forums).

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Information from the CBPF Fall 2015 Meeting

Date posted: February 8, 2019
Date posted: February 8, 2019

If you manage to haul a frozen, skinned beaver carcass up a remote mountain pass in the middle of winter, then nail it about two metres up a tree, you might just be lucky enough to attract a wolverine.



That’s what researchers have been trying to do for the past few years as part of a multi-year study to learn more about these elusive predators, and how they move and survive throughout the mountainous terrain of southern Alberta and British Columbia.



Date posted: February 8, 2019

This project builds from a body of work to support conservation planning and design for the Arid Lands Initiative (ALI) in the Columbia Plateau ecoregion. Previous work identified a suite of habitats and species along with their associated viability and stressors, as well as a portfolio of Priority Core Areas (PCAs) and high priority connectivity corridors. This previous work represents a design that, if realized, would improve protection of the current distributions of species, habitats, and connectivity corridors.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

About Us

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Cascadia is home to many sockeye salmon, including major runs that pass through the Columbia and Fraser basins. The largest stock in the world famously runs through these ecosystems by way of the Adams River and through the Fraser River system. Sockeye salmon in the both the Fraser and Columbia basins have declined substantially from historic levels when runs were as large as 3 million fish in the Columbia and 40 million in the Fraser at the turn of the 20th century. Reasons for these declines are diverse and sometimes speculative.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Untouched area. Mule Deer winter range and Grizzly bear habitat.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

If the youth leaders of tomorrow's conservation movement could tell natural resource practitioners, wildlife and wildlands agencies, and non-profit organizations one thing, what would it be? To kick off the 2015 annual meeting of the Cascadia Partner Forum known we decided to find out as part of our Voices of Cascadia project.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

WA Resource Quality

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Formed by practitioners in Washington and British Columbia’s Cascade mountains in the summer of 2012, the Cascadia Partner Forum fosters a network of natural resource practitioners working with the Great Northern and North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperatives to build the adaptive capacity of the landscape and species living within it.

Date posted: February 8, 2019