Resources

LCCs have produced a wealth of informational documents, reports, fact sheets, webinars and more to help support resource managers in designing and delivering conservation at landscape scales.

Describing the social network that links the interconnected partners is the first step to leverage the network’s capacity to be greater than the sum of its parts.The Northwest Boreal Landscape Conservation Cooperative partners and a social network scientist are applying social network theory to create a system of nodes and edges of a Conservation Social Network. Dr. Patrick Bixler from Texas A&M University is working with partners to quantify the connections and flow of information.

Date posted: March 8, 2019

The circumboreal vegetation mapping (CBVM) project is an international collaboration among vegetation
scientists to create a new vegetation map of the boreal region at a 1:7.5 million scale with a common legend and
mapping protocol (Talbot and Meades 2011). The map is intended to portray potential natural vegetation, or the
vegetation that would exist in the absence of human or natural disturbance, rather than existing vegetation that
is commonly generated at larger scales. This report and map contributes to the CBVM effort by developing maps

Date posted: March 8, 2019

Observations of changes in wetland surface water hydrology. Water levels are measured in terms of surface water are cover. Measurements are in hectares. Note: water levels are not depth values, which could be problematic for very deep bowled wetlands that do not have a lot of changes in surface water area. Date is measured in Julian day – Day of the year. 

Date posted: February 21, 2019

Describes all data products for this project; shapefiles & tables (geodatabase), hydrographs (plots), and raw hydrologic data.

Date posted: February 21, 2019

We created hydrographs measuring the changes of surface water area for each wetland in our study area. Hydrographs show both seasonal and long-term change. We created 3 hydrographs for each wetland:



1.) Observational hydrographs from time series of Landsat satellite imagers (1984 - 2011)

2.) Modelled historic hydrograph compared to observational remote sensed based on modelled VIC model and climate for the 2080s

3.) Modelled historic hydrograph (1980s) compared to future projected hydrograph using climate for the 2080s



Date posted: February 21, 2019

The objective of this project was to conduct breeding season surveys for bird species of conservation priority in the Oklahoma portion of the Oaks and Prairies. The primary purpose of this annual report is to provide orientation to the accompanying file of raw data and summaries from our field work in 2018.

Date posted: February 20, 2019

Breeding bird survey data across a ten- county area of central Oklahoma. Data contains raw abundance and detection-corrected density estimates.

Date posted: February 20, 2019

Vulnerability assessments combine quantitative and qualitative evaluations of the exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity of species or natural communities to current and future threats. When combined with the economic, ecological or evolutionary value of the species, vulnerability assessments quantify the relative risk to regional species and natural communities and can enable informed prioritization of conservation efforts. Vulnerability assessments are common practice in conservation biology, including the potential impacts of future climate scenarios.

Date posted: February 20, 2019

The Northwest Boreal Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NWB LCC) is a partnership between agencies involved in land management across Alaska, Yukon, Northwest Territories, and British Columbia. The NWB LCC aims to coordinate science and support to decision makers for improving land management decisions. Knowledge gaps have been identified by the NWB LCC and are beginning to be filled. One of the priority information gaps is knowledge of the anthropogenic footprint currently on the landscape.

Date posted: February 19, 2019

Priority resources are the set of biological, ecological, and cultural features and ecological processes collaboratively identified as most important or most significant for the focus geography. These resources embody the key components of the Peninsular Florida Landscape Conservation Cooperative (PFLCC) vision, which is a collective vision that reflects the mission, vision, common interests, and values of the focus geography partners. The priority resources are the focus of the PFLCC’s planning, design and implementation of conservation strategies(Benscoter et al. 2015).

Date posted: February 19, 2019

To inform management for a resilient and functioning landscape, we need to understand how the landscape is changing. The Northwest Boreal Landscape Conservation Cooperative, working with a diverse group of managers and stakeholders, initiated development of a coordinated monitoring system for the northwest boreal ecoregion in 2016. The goal for the coordinated monitoring system is to provide a set of common denominators (i.e., minimum standards) that will allow cooperators to combine monitoring data to make landscape-scale inferences.

Date posted: February 15, 2019

The Northwest Boreal Science and Management Research Tool (SMRT) provides the ability to search a vast, curated database for the Northwest Boreal region in one place. Users can explore thousands of curated scholarly articles, state and federal resource reports, land management plans, and unique transboundary datasets. Each entry includes geographic information about the area of study, allowing users to draw a box on a map to narrow searches to information directly related to a specific region in Alaska, the Yukon, British Columbia, and Northwest Territories.

Date posted: February 15, 2019

Northwest Boreal Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NWB LCC) partners are working to collectively design a sustainable future for the people, cultures, and ecosystems in the region. To begin this difficult task, the partners asked for a review and synthesis of existing natural resource management plans, covering both countries and all four states, provinces and territories.

Date posted: February 12, 2019

Depressional wetlands in the Columbia Plateau are valuable habitats because they maintain surface water into or throughout the dry summers. The source of that moisture—surface runoff from surrounding areas, or groundwater in local aquifers—may determine if these wetlands are seasonal, permanent, or semi-permanent. Helping these wetlands continue to provide habitat and other services requires understanding how these flooding and drying patterns (their hydrology) have changed in the past, and how projected changes in climate might affect them.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Under the Shared Landscapes Outcomes initiative of the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GNLCC), a pilot project was implemented to address aquatic integrity and stressors in the Columbia River Basin.  Members of the GNLCC Columbia Basin Partner Forum (CBPF) organized and convened this workshop in response to shared concerns from the CBPF about aquatic invasive species in the Columbia River Basin, and a direct request from Pacific Northwest Economic Region (PNWER) for a prospectus on priority research needs for Quagga/Zebra mussels.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

The High Divide Collaborative is an effective partnership of public land managers, state wildlife agencies, landowners, local community leaders, scientists and conservation groups working together to conserve and restore lands of importance for local communities and to protect ecological integrity at the landscape scale.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

For ALI partners to promote connectivity between the Yakima Training Center and Hanford Reach core areas, we must first engage a diverse network of land owners, many of whom have not been involved in the connectivity prioritization process. To begin to build these relationships, we are initiating a community listening forum with local land owners, community groups, land managers and conservation groups with the intent of learning from each other’s expertise and unique perspectives. 



Our goals are to:

Date posted: February 8, 2019

GNLCC Data Richness Wall Map

Date posted: February 8, 2019

The Ecological Connectivity Project brings together managers and decision makers to address challenges impacting ecological connectivity throughout the geography of the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative. We encourage those involved with connectivity efforts at any scale to get involved with this project as its success depends on stakeholder engagement from all corners of the Great Northern LCC geography.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

These layers show land ownership and status of all Canadian and U.S. lands that fall within the boundaries of the Great Northern Landscae Conservation Cooperative.  Layers were compiled from various sources, each with it's own metadata reference file.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

GNLCC Jurisdictions Wall Map

Date posted: February 8, 2019

The Heart of the Rockies Conservation Atlas is delivering the latest science in climate change adaptation and habitat connectivity to our land trust partners to help identify and validate selection of future conservation targets. Our Science Coordinator is curating a collection of connectivity and climate data at a scale that is useful to on-the-ground practitioners. He is working with university and agency partners to identify, screen, and procure the data. 

Date posted: February 8, 2019

The GNLCC Connectivity Prioritization Pilot Project has been a two stage project designed to address Goal 2 of the four strategic goals of the GNLCC: Conserve a permeable landscape with connectivity across aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, including species movement, genetic connectivity, migration, dispersal, life history, and biophysical processes. In this project, connectivity is being examined in light of the landscape stressor of existing and potential future land uses.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

5 Regional Data Richness Wall Maps

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Focal connectivity areas of the Ecological Connectivity Project.  Project details can be found at https://sites.google.com/site/gnecoconnectivity/.



 

Date posted: February 8, 2019

This data atlas was created as part of the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GNLCC) Ecological Connectivity Project.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Patch importance provides a measure of how large, intact, and connected a “patch” of habitat is for each biome type. More “intact” patches are depicted using a more saturated (darker) color, whereas less intact have lighter, less saturated colors.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Transboundary Region Reference Map

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Interest in using environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling to monitor aquatic species is exploding. This technique makes it possible to conduct rapid and cost-effective broad-scale species assessment and monitoring, particularly when informed by robust species distribution models. Here, we provide preliminary results from an effort to identify habitats occupied by juvenile bull trout in all 4th-code basins constituting their historical U.S. range.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

GNLCC Reference Wall Map

Date posted: February 8, 2019

The Great Northern LCC Steering Committee met in Waterton in May 2014 and selected connectivity as a priority shared landscape objective and decided to support this Ecological Connectivity Prioritization Pilot Project. Connectivity is the second of the GNLCC's four strategic goals: Conserve a permeable landscape with connectivity across aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, including species movement, genetic connectivity, migration, dispersal, life history, and biophysical processes.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

The ease, efficiency, and sensitivity of environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling of species in aquatic environments is leading to an explosion in its use across North America. In this presentation, we describe eDNA sampling technology and share first year field results from the ongoing range-wide, eDNA-based inventory of bull trout in the northwestern U.S. during which ~3,000 sites were sampled by dozens of partner agencies.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

In May 2014, the GNLCC Steering Committee approved a pilot project to coordinate science-based management across the GNLCC on the connectivity goal. The SC allocated a total of $190k over 3 years. In the third year of the GNLCC Connectivity Project, with $75k support, work towards fulfilling the connectivity goal of the GNLCC fell into the following categories:

 

Date posted: February 8, 2019

USGS Greater Sage Grouse National Research Strategy | Sage Steppe Partner Forum Wiki

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Forecasting sagebrush ecosystem components and greater sage grouse habitat

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Introduction to the Sage Steppe Partner Forum Wiki

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Maximizing Minimums: Mapping basic requirements for greater sage-grouse

Date posted: February 8, 2019

This website provides Sage Steppe Partner Forum members forum information and a workspace for members to collaborate and contribute (ideas, news, project information, files, etc.) Features Include:

  • Partner contact information data entry
  • Contact information listings
  • News and update distribution
  • Date/time tracking
  • Document distribution
Date posted: February 8, 2019

Sage-grouse habitat and post-wildfire restoration in the Great Basin

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Sagebrush responses to shifting climate and fire disturbances

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Assessing land use practices in sagebrush and grassland ecosystems

Date posted: February 8, 2019
In recognition of the need to conserve a healthy sagebrush ecosystem to provide for the long-term conservation of its inhabitants, the US Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has made updates to the Conservation Efforts Database (CED), to serve as a tool designed to capture the unprecedented conservation efforts occurring within this ecosystem, not only for its most famous resident, the greater sage-grouse but for the other species that rely on sagebrush for all or part of its life.
Date posted: February 8, 2019

Web map available for public access and consumption.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

The Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation are a diverse people from many areas. We are the Kah-miltpah, Oche- Chotes, Palouse, Wenatchapam, Klickitat, Pesquose, See-ap-Cat, Yakama, Klinquit, Shyiks, Sk’in-pah, Kow-was-say-ee, Li-ay-was, and Wish-ham. Our tribes are strong and resilient people. We have lived on these lands for countless generations, from time immemorial. We will continue to flourish on our homelands for countless generations to come.

 

Date posted: February 8, 2019

The ability of landscapes to impede species’ movement or gene flow may be quantified by resistance models. These models form the basis of many connectivity analyses such as designing linkage networks, predicting impacts of future landscape change, and siting mitigation projects. Because empirical data is often unavailable or difficult to acquire, many resistance models are parameterized by expert opinion. Importantly, there has been little exploration of how expert parameterization of resistance models affects their ability to predict rates of movement and gene flow.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Washington Wildlife Habitat Connectivity Working Group (WHCWG). 2012. Washington Connected Landscapes Project: Analysis of the Columbia Plateau Ecoregion. Washington’s Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Department of Transportation, Olympia, WA.

Date posted: February 8, 2019
Date posted: February 8, 2019

Date posted: February 8, 2019