Resources

LCCs have produced a wealth of informational documents, reports, fact sheets, webinars and more to help support resource managers in designing and delivering conservation at landscape scales.

These Central Valley habitats, species groups, and species reflect a collective set of priorities and will be the focus of vulnerability assessments and adaptation strategies and actions

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Assessing vulnerabilities is a critical step in climate–smart
conservation planning. The Central Valley Landscape
Conservation Project (CVLCP) participants evaluated the
vulnerability of a group of selected priority natural resources
by discussing and answering a series of questions for
sensitivity, exposure, and adaptive capacity at a workshop
held in October of 2015. The vulnerability scores presented
in this summary were calculated based on the expertise
of the CVLCP participants and are accompanied by a

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Metrics used to evaluate scenario impacts and success of proposed conservation actions were provided in datasets for specific Central Valley basins. Metrics included the amount of projected available habitat area (and loss of area) across years, and resulting impacts of habitat reduction on goal waterbird populations. Metrics evaluating success of proposed habitat conservation actions primarily focused on adequacy of food supplies to support wintering waterfowl at CVJV-goal population levels. Metrics were provided for each scenario evaluated in WEAP-CVwh.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Climate change, when combined with more conventional stress from human exploitation, calls into question the capacity of both existing ecological communities and resource management institutions to experience disturbances while substantially retaining their same functions and identities. In other words, the physical and biological effects of climate change raise fundamental challenges to the resilience of natural ecosystems.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The overarching workshop goal is to identify an optimal allocation of limited funds across time and space regarding potential actions within subregions that can be coordinated among partners to achieve fundamental objectives for conservation in SFB.
This effort builds off results from preceding efforts; October 2011 SFB SDM workshop (Takekawa et al. 2012); 2013-2014 Baylands Ecosystem Habitat Goals Update and other planning documents; and spring 2014 SFB SDM webinar series. The Spring 2014 SFB SDM Workshop tackles five main challenges:

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This website provides information on the project's effort to establish a network of environmental monitoring stations within the boundaries of the California LCC. Users of this web portal can view predicted distributional changes in landbird, habitat, and climate under future climate conditions and find out general information on the progress and evolution of the network.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Climate refugia management has been proposed as a climate adaptation strategy in the face of global change. Key to this strategy is identification of these areas as well as an understanding of how they are connected on the landscape. Focusing on meadows of the Sierra Nevada in California, we examined multiple factors affecting connectivity using circuit theory, and determined how patches have been and are expected to be affected by climate change.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Greater Farallones NMS Climate Adaptation Plan is the result of a 2-year process to characterize climate impacts and vulnerabilities to Sanctuary resources along the North-central California coast and ocean, and to develop management strategies to respond to and decrease those vulnerabilities, ultimately enhancing resource resilience to climate impacts.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This vulnerability assessment is a science-based effort to identify how and why focal resources (habitats, species, and ecosystem services) across the North-central California coast and ocean region are likely to be affected by future climate conditions. The goal of this assessment is to provide expert-driven, scientifically sound assessments to enable marine resource managers to respond to, plan, and manage for the impacts of climate change to habitats, species, and ecosystem services within the region.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The CA LCC-funded project "A Climate Change Adaptation Strategy for Sierra Nevada Birds " applied the NatureServe Climate Change Vulnerability Index tool to assess vulnerability of 168 bird species that breed in the Sierra Nevada and developed a peer-reviewed Climate Change Adaptation Strategy for Sierra Nevada bird species that are most vulnerable to climate change. “Sierra Nevada Bird Vulnerability Rankings Table” summarizes the vulnerability rankings using the NatureServe Climate Change Vulnerability Index for 168 Sierra Nevada bird species.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Trainings
The Climate Science Alliance hosts trainings and partners with other local organizations to hold trainings for the community throughout the year. Training topics range in subject matter and audience, reaching out to scientists, educators, planners and more.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Dam removal is often proposed for restoration of anadromous salmonid populations, which are in serious decline in California. However, the benefits of dam removal vary due to differences in affected populations and potential for environmental impacts. Here, we develop an assessment method to examine the relationship between dam removal and salmonid conservation, focusing on dams that act as complete migration barriers.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Fog and low cloud cover (FLCC), is very important for coastal California during the seasonally arid Meiterranean climate summer month s (June – September). The low stratus and stratocumulus clouds form ov er the ocean, adv ec t onsh ore as fog and low clouds altering the water, energy, and nutrient flux of coastal ecosystem s. Precisely located fog belt zones an be used to quantify the impacts of FLCC on ecosystem dynamics. The water and shade cover that FLCC provides during hot and dry summer periods is especially critical for endan ered species such as coho salmon.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

California Landscape Conservation Cooperative Project on estuarine shoals and vertebrate predators: In this report, we describe the integrated research program supported by the California LCC addressing sea level rise effects on estuarine shoals and the vertebrate predators dependent on these habitats.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Significant efforts are underway to translate improved understanding of how climate change is altering ecosystems into practical actions for sustaining ecosystem functions and benefits. We explore this transition in California, where adaptation and mitigation are advancing relatively rapidly, through four case studies that span large spatial domains and encompass diverse ecological systems, institutions, ownerships, and policies.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The North-central California coast and ocean is a globally significant and extraordinarily productive marine and coastal ecosystem that boasts an array of local, state and federal protected areas and other managed lands. Despite this richness and attention to conservation, this region is still vulnerable to the effects of climate change.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This webinar will focus on the Geos Institute project Managing Coast Redwoods for Resilience in a Changing Climate, which was jointly funded by the North Pacific and California LCCs. Speaker Marni Koopman, Climate Change Scientist from Geos Institute, will discuss collaboratively developed climate adaptation management actions for California Coast Redwoods.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Workshop Goal
This workshop aimed to broaden knowledge about supporting riparian restoration projects that use the principles of climate-smart restoration.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

When: May 29, 2014 1:00 - 3:30 PM

Where: Department of Water Resources, Large Conference Room, 2nd Floor, Bonderson Building, 901 P Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

The project evaluates the effects of different climate change and land use change scenarios on ecosystem services (water availability, wildlife habitat and carbon sequestration) provided by rangelands in California. The project is a partnership between the USGS and Defenders of Wildlife and it is funded by the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The USGS Coastal Ecosystem Response to Climate Change (CERCC) began in 2008 to deliver sea - level rise ecological response mod- els at a scale relevant for resource managers. Work was originally focused on the San Fran- cisco Bay estuary and then expanded to en- compass other Pacific coast sites. Our goal is to provide site specific measurements and results that land managers, planners, and those concerned with the conservation of near- shore habitats can use to make well - informed climate change adaptation strategies and deci- sions.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This project analyzed downscaled climate model data to assess the geography of climate change at scales relevant to actual conservation actions. This work analyzes the California Essential Habitat Connectivity products to determine which protected lands are most vulnerable and which of the proposed corridors would partially mitigate climate change threats.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Average percent change in multiple ecosystem services from 2010 to 2040 These maps display the average percent change in three rangeland ecosystem services – total ecosystem carbon, critical habitat and water availability – from 2010 to 2040 for three IPCC-SRES scenarios (A1B, A2 and B1) and two climate projections (warm, wet future and hot, dry future). Total ecosystem carbon is total carbon stored in vegetation and soils (up to 20 cm in depth), and was estimated annually from 2006 to 2050 by the U.S.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Climate Commons is the California LCC's starting point for discovery of climate change data and related resources, information about the science that produced it, and guidance for applying climate change science to conservation in California. The Climate Commons is a website with searchable catalogs for documents, datasets, and web resources relevant to applying climate change science to conservation management. Also available are articles about a wide range of topics intended to help natural resource managers learn about climate science and how to apply it in their work.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

We propose a statistically robust, logistically feasible, long-term monitoring program for wintering shorebirds in the Central Valley of California to track spatial and temporal population trends resulting from changing climate and habitat conditions. Specifically, we recommend a sampling design and survey protocol. We provide the data storage and analytical framework for population and trend estimates to be made annually as new data come in through the online data portal in the California Avian Data Center (CADC).

Date posted: June 23, 2018

CVJV Implementation Plan chapter and/or chapter sections incorporating results of scenario modeling and description of method to follow to evaluate potential impacts to water supplies and habitats of future proposed changes to water supply management.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Final Report to the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative (funding agency for CADS Phase 1), and interim report to the US Fish & Wildlife Service National Wildlife Refuge System Inventory and Monitoring Initiative.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Most species and ecosystems face multiple anthropogenic disruptions. Few studies have quantified the cumulative influence of multiple threats on species of conservation concern, and far fewer have quantified the potential relative value of multiple conservation interventions for population persistence in light of these threats.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Strategic plans list eradication and surveillance species for a multi-county region, as agreed upon by local land managers. Most species are based on the Cal-IPC Inventory and maps in CalWeedMapper. The purpose of these plans is to enable land managers to apply for grants for coordinated projects in their region. The emphasis is on species that can be eradicated within five years and species that are just outside the region and have a high probability of invading.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Tidal marshes will be threatened by increasing rates of sea-level rise (SLR) over the next century. Managers seek guidance on whether existing and restored marshes will be resilient under a range of potential future conditions, and on prioritizing marsh restoration and conservation activities.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Conservation managers and policy makers require models that can rank the impacts of multiple, interacting threats on biodiversity so that actions can be prioritized. An integrated modelling framework was used to predict the viability of plant populations for five species in southern California’s Mediterranean-type ecosystem. The framework integrates forecasts of land-use change from an urban growth model with projections of future climatically-suitable habitat from climate and species distribution models, which are linked to a stochastic population model.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This dataset includes Climatic Water Deficit (CWD) change, average winter (Dec, Jan, Feb) and average spring (Mar, Apr, May) snowpack change, recharge change, and runoff change from Basin Characterization Model (BCM) output using the GFDL and PCM A2 Scenarios in Sierra Nevada California, for 2010-2039, 2040-2069 and 2070-2099. The data was processed using historic (1979-2000) and future (2010-2039; 2040-2069; 2070-2099) values to calculate change.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Priority areas for conservation of tidal marsh birds given current and future environmental conditions. Maps were created using Zonation, a spatial conservation planning software tool that can take into account multiple species and scenarios to create a hierarchical prioritization of the landscape.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The CA LCC-funded project "A Climate Change Adaptation Strategy for Sierra Nevada Birds " applied the NatureServe Climate Change Vulnerability Index tool to assess vulnerability of 168 bird species that breed in the Sierra Nevada and developed a peer-reviewed Climate Change Adaptation Strategy for Sierra Nevada bird species that are most vulnerable to climate change. “Sierra Nevada Bird Vulnerability Assessment Matrix” provides the individual vulnerability factor scores upon which the vulnerability rankings are based.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Are there places that buffer species from climate change? If so, where are they, and can species get there? California natural resource managers need to develop climate change adaptation strategies to address the responses of species to warming trends, shifting precipitation regimes, and changes in vegetation communities. Climate change refugia -- areas that remain relatively stable as the climate changes -- are important to consider in adaptation planning, but little was known about the nature and distribution of these places.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

March 19, 2014 12:00-1:00 pm PST

Speaker Glen MacDonald, Director of the UCLA Institute for the Environment and Sustainability.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Basin Characterization Model (BCM) dataset provides historical and projected climate and hydrology data at a 270 meter resolution, which is relevant for watershed-scale evaluation and planning. These data have formed the basis for multiple research projects and vulnerability assessments applying climate change projections to conservation decision-making, providing a common base-layer and set of assumptions across these projects.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Final report with project results

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This two and a half day workshop offered five sessions organized around a change adaptation framework. Each session was designed to be a shared learning process that would both test the framework as a tool and help the participants learn how they might use it in their workplaces. Sessions had a combination of speakers and group exercises.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Current and projected bird distribution and abundance layers, updated with new model that has better inputs. Point Blue Conservation Science assessed the effects of sea-level rise (SLR) and salinity changes on San Francisco Bay tidal marsh ecosystems. Tidal marshes are naturally resilient to SLR, in that they can build up elevation through the capture of suspended sediment and deposition of organic material (vegetation). Thus, a "bathtub" model approach is not appropriate for assessing impacts to this dynamic habitat.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This graphing tool presents climate and hydrology data values from the California Basin Characterization Model dataset plotted over time for 156 hydrologic basins (HUC-8 basins) that comprise hydrologic California. You can select a basin by clicking on it on the map on the left; hover your mouse to see basin names. You can select a data variable and a smoothing period on the right, then click "Draw".

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The North-central California coast and ocean is a globally significant and extraordinarily productive marine and coastal ecosystem that boasts an array of local, state and federal protected areas and other managed lands. Despite this richness and attention to conservation, this region is still vulnerable to the effects of climate change.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

In a rapidly changing climate, effective bird conservation requires not only reliable information about the current vulnerability of species of conservation concern, but also credible projections of their future vulnerability. Such projections may enable managers to preempt or reduce emerging climate-related threats through appropriate habitat management. We used NatureServe’s Climate Change Vulnerability Index (CCVI) to predict vulnerability to climate change of 168 bird species that breed in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California, USA.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Central Valley of California (CVC) is an important region for wintering shorebirds in the Pacific Flyway. Despite the importance of the CVC for Pacific Flyway shorebirds, currently there is no regular monitoring to quantify spatial and temporal variation and trends in shorebird populations using this landscape.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

EcoAdapt and partners have been conducting a climate change vulnerability and adaptation assessment for focal resources in the Sierra over the past year. We will be showing the final results of these assessments based on the two workshops held in 2013 and additional syntheses by EcoAdapt. Additionally we will be explaining next steps for the project and discussing the broader impacts. Although the geographic focus is the Sierra, the methods and results are relevant to all of California so we encourage folks to participate from other areas!

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Contributions to all chapters of the BEHGU, in particular the Ocean-Wetland Transition Zone, Conceptual Model of the Bay, Chair of the Wildlife Working Group. Also on the Habitat Evolution Work Group, and the Steering Committee. Writing the summary and recommendations.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Data layers of current and projected suitable habitat for five species: big-eared woodrat (Neotoma macrotis), California gnatcatcher, Ceanothus greggii, Ceanothus verrucosus, and Tecate cypress in the South Coast Ecoregion in California, USA. Data set includes scenarios with and without projected urban growth over a 50 year period, and with and without projected climate change over a 50 year period.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

This is a table describing information on the majority of meadows in Yosemite National Park. This table includes information that was developed by this project, namely columns describing connectivity value based on different predictors and a measure of whether the meadow is a climate change refugium.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The USGS Western Ecological Research Center has worked with federal, Tribal, state, and local partners to establish a network of study sites in 17 estuaries along the Pacific Coast, examining the climate change effects on tidal wetlands with high-quality local data, downscaled models, and projected storm effects.

The project's lead scientists have convened these partners in the coastal study site areas in locally hosted workshops to:

Date posted: June 23, 2018

The Future San Francisco Bay Tidal Marshes Climate Smart Planning Tool is a web application that enables the user to view and query maps made with projected tidal marsh elevations, vegetation changes, five tidal marsh-dependent bird species distribution probabilities and densities, and current and future conservation prioritization. The map-making tool presents the user with current and future maps side by side, and allows for choices of higher and lower levels of sea level rise, sediment availability, and organic material accumulation.

Date posted: June 23, 2018

Refugia have long been studied from paleontological and biogeographical perspectives to understand how populations persisted during past periods of unfavorable climate. Recently, researchers have applied the idea to contemporary landscapes to identify climate change refugia, here defined as areas relatively buffered from contemporary climate change over time that enable persistence of valued physical, ecological, and socio-cultural resources.

Date posted: June 23, 2018