Resources

LCCs have produced a wealth of informational documents, reports, fact sheets, webinars and more to help support resource managers in designing and delivering conservation at landscape scales.

Columbia Plateau Phase 2 Focal Species Layer Packs (ESRI GIS Layerfiles) v10.1

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Frequently Asked Questions About Climate Projections - Amy Daniels

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Planning for Connectivity on National Forests Under 2012 Planning Rule

Date posted: February 8, 2019

The Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GNLCC) addresses landscape scale stressors across a large area of the northwest US and the Canadian west. The GNLCC supports several Partner Forums that span unique geographic sub-regions of the GNLCC (http://greatnorthernlcc.org/partner-forums).

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Information from the CBPF Fall 2015 Meeting

Date posted: February 8, 2019
Date posted: February 8, 2019

If you manage to haul a frozen, skinned beaver carcass up a remote mountain pass in the middle of winter, then nail it about two metres up a tree, you might just be lucky enough to attract a wolverine.



That’s what researchers have been trying to do for the past few years as part of a multi-year study to learn more about these elusive predators, and how they move and survive throughout the mountainous terrain of southern Alberta and British Columbia.



Date posted: February 8, 2019

This project builds from a body of work to support conservation planning and design for the Arid Lands Initiative (ALI) in the Columbia Plateau ecoregion. Previous work identified a suite of habitats and species along with their associated viability and stressors, as well as a portfolio of Priority Core Areas (PCAs) and high priority connectivity corridors. This previous work represents a design that, if realized, would improve protection of the current distributions of species, habitats, and connectivity corridors.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

About Us

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Cascadia is home to many sockeye salmon, including major runs that pass through the Columbia and Fraser basins. The largest stock in the world famously runs through these ecosystems by way of the Adams River and through the Fraser River system. Sockeye salmon in the both the Fraser and Columbia basins have declined substantially from historic levels when runs were as large as 3 million fish in the Columbia and 40 million in the Fraser at the turn of the 20th century. Reasons for these declines are diverse and sometimes speculative.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Untouched area. Mule Deer winter range and Grizzly bear habitat.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

If the youth leaders of tomorrow's conservation movement could tell natural resource practitioners, wildlife and wildlands agencies, and non-profit organizations one thing, what would it be? To kick off the 2015 annual meeting of the Cascadia Partner Forum known we decided to find out as part of our Voices of Cascadia project.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

WA Resource Quality

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Formed by practitioners in Washington and British Columbia’s Cascade mountains in the summer of 2012, the Cascadia Partner Forum fosters a network of natural resource practitioners working with the Great Northern and North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperatives to build the adaptive capacity of the landscape and species living within it.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Understanding a species’ behavioral response to rapid environmental change is an ongoing challenge in modern conservation. Anthropogenic landscape modification, or “human footprint,” is well documented as a central cause of large mammal decline and range contractions where the proximal mechanisms of decline are often contentious. Direct mortality is an obvious cause; alternatively, human‐modified landscapes perceived as unsuitable by some species may contribute to shifts in space use through preferential habitat selection.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Grizzly Habitat

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Connecting with Kettle population

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Largest untouched mule deer winter range in our territory.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Cross-jurisdictional analysis area from the Canadian Okanagan Valley south to Yakama Basin for wildlife habitat analysis for Cascadia Partner Forum.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Salish Sea Ecosystem

Date posted: February 8, 2019

WA Bear Population Units

Date posted: February 8, 2019

2012 BC Grizzly Bear Planning Units. These are boundaries identifying similar behavioural ecotypes and sub-populations of Grizzly bears

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Across Washington/ Idaho border

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Hall Mountain Big horn Sheep Collar data

Date posted: February 8, 2019

North-South Movement

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Largest untouched mule deer winter range in our territory.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

North-South Movement

Date posted: February 8, 2019

This GIS dataset is part of a suite of wildlife habitat connectivity data produced by the Washington Wildlife Habitat Connectivity Working Group (WHCWG). The WHCWG is a voluntary public-private partnership between state and federal agencies, universities, tribes, and non-governmental organizations.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

The Washington-British Columbia Transboundary Climate-Connectivity Project engaged science-practice partnerships to identify potential climate impacts on wildlife habitat connectivity in the transboundary region of Washington and British Columbia, and adaptation actions for addressing these impacts. This gallery includes data gathered or created as part of this project, as well as accompanying reports describing key findings for 13 case studies (including 11 species, a vegetation system, and a region).



Date posted: February 8, 2019

Hwy 6 Crossings East of Kelowna

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Description: With their project, Building Cross Cultural Capacity in the Crown of the Continent, Kimberly Paul and Laura Caplins are working to increase the “cross cultural capacity” of indigenous and non-indigenous groups to collaborate on climate adaptation in the Crown of the Continent. In order to achieve this purpose, the objectives of this project are to identify

Date posted: February 8, 2019

The Okanagan-Kettle subregion straddles the Canada–USA border between the Cascade Range on the west and the Monashee Mountains and Kettle Range to the east. It has been identified as a key area for maintenance and restoration of north–south and east–west wildlife habitat connectivity.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

The great thaw, As temperatures rise, many American glaciers could vanish in a few decades

Date posted: February 8, 2019

We will develop an approach to identify fire refugia in Rocky Mountain ecosystems of the U.S. and Canada then test the function of refugia for biodiversity conservation under current and future climate/fire scenarios. Our products will be designed to inform decision-making in land/easement acquisition, identification of critical areas for maintaining landscape and process connectivity/permeability, and extension of the temporal context for spatial conservation decision making. The approach will be testable for transferability to other locations and ecosystems.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

This database includes fire perimeter polygons for fires which reached a size >= 385 ha, and burned between the years of 1984-2011. Each fire has a unique numeric identifier of "PolyID". Additional attributes are as follows:

FIRE_ID: For those fires with an ID, the ID assigned by the reporting agency of the MTBS project.

FIRENAME: Names of those fires which are named. This is uncommon in Canada.

YEAR: The year the fire burned.

MONTH: The month the fire burned. If no month data is available the field includes a 0.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Shapefile of a set of fires sampled from the GNLCC Large Fire Database, 1984-2011. This sampled was collected from across the total variability in climate within the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GNLCC) study area. Additional detail about the topography, climate, and burn severity was collected for this identified sample, and used to model fire refugia and low-severity burn probability within the fire perimeters.



Each fire has a unique numeric identifier of "PolyID". Additional attributes are as follows:

Date posted: February 8, 2019

The transboundary region of Washington and British Columbia (Fig. 1) is important for the conservation of many wildlife species. Some species of conservation concern, such as wolverine (Gulo gulo) and Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis), have home ranges that span the international border. Other species depend on the region for seasonal habitat. All regional wildlife species will require a connected network of habitats spanning the border as they adjust their ranges to meet life history requirements under future changes to climate and land-use.

Date posted: February 8, 2019

Presenter: Sandra L. Haire, Ph.D. As a landscape ecologist, Sandra is primarily interested in understanding how disturbance creates spatial patterns and affects ecological processes. Her research topics include the influence of management, climate, and topography on fire regimes, and identification of characteristic spatial and temporal scales of post-fire succession and forest regeneration.

Date posted: February 8, 2019
Date posted: February 7, 2019

This layer represents fires from 1985 to 2010 in the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem. This layer is not a complete representation of all fires. It is a compilation from multiple sources.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

For the CCE, the riparian ecosystem was classified using three existing layers in a GIS:

A. Streams network:

--- Streams_CCE_5kmBuffer_UTM11NAD83.shp.

B. Water class of the landcover layer:

--- Landcover_CCE_5kmBuffer_UTM11NAD83.img.

C. Digital elevation model (DEM) (22m Aster GDEM) provided by METI and NASA:

--- aster_dem.rrd.



Date posted: February 7, 2019

This layer represents the stream network for the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem. The data are a compilation from multiple sources.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Various documents related to 2013 CMP Forum: Large Landscapes: Working Across Boundaries

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Derived from data provided by USDA Forest Service, Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, and GeoBC on Bruce spanworm, Large aspen tortrix, and Forest tent caterpillar .

See Data Mining Report, uploaded with this file, for more information 

Date posted: February 7, 2019

CCE Boundary for Synthesized Data

Date posted: February 7, 2019

This dataset was developed as part of a long-term project monitoring the ecological health of the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem (CCE). This effort is a collaborative project between National Park Service Rocky Mountain Inventory and Monitoring Network (ROMN) (Landscape Dynamics Vital Sign), Crown Managers Partnership, Ecological Health Subcommittee (CMP EH) (Landscapes Indicator), and University of Calgary, Geography Department. Purpose and goals of the Crown Manager's Partnership and the Rocky Mountain Network Vital Signs monitoring programs are available at the respective websites.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

These data represent land cover and land use for the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem. The data are a compilation from multiple sources. Grid cell values correspond to the following land use / land cover types: 20 - water 30 - barren 31 - ice/snow 34 - developed 50 - scrub/shrub 80 - wetland 110 - grassland 120 - agriculture 210 - coniferous forest 220 - deciduous forest 230 - mixed forest NoData values along the border have been fixed This dataset was developed as part of a long-term project monitoring the ecological health of the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem (CCE).

Date posted: February 7, 2019