Resources

LCCs have produced a wealth of informational documents, reports, fact sheets, webinars and more to help support resource managers in designing and delivering conservation at landscape scales.

Our actions today to build ecosystem resilience to climate change will help us protect the Gunnison Basin’s natural resources—clean air and wildlife habitat, and the livelihoods they provide in the future for people. The Gunnison Climate Working Group, a group of public and private partners formed in 2010, is looking to understand the threats posed by climate change, identify strategies to reduce adverse impacts, and promote coordinated implementation of these strategies.



Date posted: June 5, 2019

This data shows Boat Ramp locations in the Gulf of Mexico. Each data set was compiled from each state, including, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. Data for some of the states may not be completely up to date or completely accurate.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

Climate projection data were downloaded from the Climatewizard application for the coastal region for the Gulf of Mexico. Climate projection data represent the monthly, seasonal, and yearly mean for the time period of 2000-2050 for the following variables: AET:PET ratio, Moisture deficit, Moisture surplus, PET, Precipitation, Temperature, Rainfall Anomaly, and Standard Precipitation Index. In addition, models representing change in the average mean from period of (1961-1990) is available for each of the variables.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

Dataset covering the Gulf of Mexico coast, clipped from the origional datset of the conterminous U.S., for the year 1985-2011. Contains spatially gridded mean monthly precipitation at 4km grid cell resolution. Distribution of the point measurements to the spatial grid was accomplished using the PRISM model, developed and applied by Dr. Christopher Daly of the PRISM Climate Group at Oregon State University. This dataset is available free-of-charge on the PRISM website. Data clip was obtained through climatewizard.org

Date posted: May 31, 2019

Attempts to stabilize the shore can greatly influence rates of shoreline change. Beach nourishment in particular will bias rates of observed shoreline change toward accretion or stability, even though the natural beach, in the absence of nourishment, would be eroding. Trembanis and Pilkey (1998) prepared a summary of identifiable beach nourishment projects in the Gulf Coast region that had been conducted before 1996. Those records were used to identify shoreline segments that had been influenced by beach nourishment.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

NGDC's U.S. Coastal Relief Model (CRM) provides the first comprehensive view of the U.S. coastal zone integrating offshore bathymetry with land topography into a seamless representation of the coast. The CRM spans the U.S. East and West Coasts, the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Hawaii, reaching out to, and in places even beyond, the continental slope. Bathymetric and topographic data sources include: NGDC's NOS hydrographic surveys, multibeam bathymetry, and trackline bathymetry; the U.S.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

The Protected Areas Database of the United States (PAD-US) is a geodatabase, managed by USGS GAP, that illustrates and describes public land ownership, management and other conservation lands, including voluntarily provided privately protected areas. The State, Regional and LCC geodatabases contain two feature classes. The PADUS1_3_FeeEasement feature class and the national MPA feature class. Legitimate and other protected area overlaps exist in the full inventory, with Easements loaded on top of Fee.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines by compiling shoreline positions from pre-existing historical shoreline databases and by generating historical and modern shoreline data. Shorelines are compiled by state and generally correspond to one of four time periods: 1800s, 1920s-1930s, 1970s, and 1998-2002. Each shoreline may represent a compilation of data from one or more sources for one or more dates provided by one or more agencies.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension developed by the USGS in cooperation with TPMC Environmental Services. The extension is designed to efficiently lead a user through the major steps of shoreline change analysis.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

This data set represents the extent, approximate location and type of wetlands and deepwater habitats in the United States and its Territories. These data delineate the areal extent of wetlands and surface waters as defined by Cowardin et al. (1979). Certain wetland habitats are excluded from the National mapping program because of the limitations of aerial imagery as the primary data source used to detect wetlands. These habitats include seagrasses or submerged aquatic vegetation that are found in the intertidal and subtidal zones of estuaries and near shore coastal waters.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

This dataset consists of the current distribution (2000s) of mangrove forests in the southeastern U.S. This dataset was created from the current best available mangrove data on a state specific basis. Florida mangrove data was extracted from Florida Landuse Land Cover Classification System (FLUCCS). For Louisiana, we used observations of mangrove stands from aerial surveys by Michot et al. (2010). Mangrove presence in Texas came from maps produced by Sherrod & McMillan (1981) and the NOAA Benthic Habitat Atlas of Coastal Texas (Finkbeiner et al. 2009).

Date posted: May 31, 2019

Florida - These data were taken from the Florida Boating Access Facilities Inventory and Economic Study including a pilot study for Lee County: A Report to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission on August 30, 2009. This GIS point data set is based on the data contained in the final databases that were provided to FWC on June 2, 2009 in Microsoft Access format.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

This map layer shows major ports in the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. A port is a city, town, or urban area with a harbor where ships load or unload. This is a revised version of the July 2012 map layer.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

These data identify, in general, the areas where final critical habitat exist for species listed as endangered or threatened.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

GAP species range data show a coarse representation of the total areal extent of a species or the geographic limits within which a species can be found (Morrison and Hall 2002). To represent these geographic limits, GAP compiled existing GAP data, where available, and NatureServe data (Patterson et al. 2003, Ridgely et al. 2007, NatureServe 2010) IUCN data (IUCN 2004), where needed.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

This is an ArcGIS shapefile which depicts the seasonal salinity dynamics of 32 Gulf of Mexico estuaries. To characterize the dynamic nature of estuarine salinity gradients, a multivariate methodology (Bulger et al. 1993) was applied to derive five bio-salinity zones in four salinity seasons for 32 Gulf of Mexico estuaries (Christensen et al. 1997). This seasonal salinity zone spatial framework built upon and refined earlier studies which characterized salinity on an annual-averaged basis (NOAA 1985, Orlando et al. 1993, NOAA 2007).

Date posted: May 31, 2019

1985 Gulf of Mexico Atlas abstract American oyster Crassostrea virginica Ostion americano

Date posted: May 31, 2019

This dataset represents the extent of urbanization (for the year indicated) predicted by the model SLEUTH, developed by Dr. Keith C. Clarke, at the University of California, Santa Barbara, Department of Geography and modified by David I. Donato of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Eastern Geographic Science Center (EGSC). Further model modification and implementation was performed at the Biodiversity and Spatial Information Center at North Carolina State University.

Date posted: May 30, 2019

This data is the 2010 era and the 1996-2010-era change classification of U.S.Gulf of Mexico region. This data set utilized full or partial Landsat scenes which were analyzed according to the Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) protocol to determine land cover.

Date posted: May 30, 2019

These data were created as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Services Center's efforts to create an online mapping viewer depicting potential sea level rise and its associated impacts on the nation's coastal areas. The purpose of the mapping viewer is to provide coastal managers and scientists with a preliminary look at sea level rise (slr) and coastal flooding impacts. The viewer is a screening-level tool that uses nationally consistent data sets and analyses.

Date posted: May 30, 2019

The Southeast Blueprint User Guide is a resource to help conservation professionals use the Blueprint to bring in new resources and inform decision-making. It compiles different examples of real Blueprint uses to provide new ideas about how to connect to this larger strategy. It showcases the approaches, wording, and maps that Blueprint staff have found to work best in different situations. It showcases a range of case studies, grouped into a few themes that summarize the primary ways people have used the Blueprint.

Date posted: May 15, 2019

The SE Blueprint 3.0 Development Process is a report that explains how the Conservation Blueprint was created.

Date posted: May 14, 2019

Vulnerability, Resilience and Connectivity of Landscapes and Riparian Habitat in the SRLCC presented by Dave Theobald

Date posted: May 11, 2019
SRLCC_2011_TheobaldReed_Vulnerability_GIS
Date posted: May 11, 2019

The Southeast Conservation Blueprint is a map of important areas for conservation and restoration across the Southeast and Caribbean. The Blueprint categories represent the level of value---high or medium---of healthy natural resources and their potential to benefit fish, wildlife and plants. The Blueprint is the primary product of the Southeast Conservation Adaptation Strategy (SECAS).

Date posted: May 9, 2019

We flew aerial line transect surveys between March 30 and May 3, 2012, to estimate the abundance of lesser prairie-chickens (*Tympanuchus pallidicinctus*) and lesser prairie-chicken leks in four habitat regions in the Great Plains U.S. Estimates were supplemented with data from surveys conducted by Texas Tech University in two regions in the Texas Panhandle and surveys conducted by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation in Oklahoma.

Date posted: April 2, 2019

Vegetative cover surveys for the Nebraska collected for the purpose of developing a land cover map. These data were collected by Nebraska Game and Parks Commission in coordination with the Missouri Resource Assessment Partnership (MoRAP). The overall vegetation community was recorded in addition to the dominant 3 species and percent cover of these vegetative communities: herbaceous, shrub, and woody. A photo was taken of each survey location and attached to the record.

Date posted: April 2, 2019

These are preliminary vegetative cover surveys for the Nebraska collected for the purpose of developing a land cover map. These data were collected by Nebraska Game and Parks Commission in coordination with the Missouri Resource Assessment Partnership (MoRAP). The overall vegetation community was recorded in addition to the dominant 3 species and percent cover of these vegetative communities: herbaceous, shrub, and woody. A photo was taken of each survey location and attached to the record.

Date posted: April 2, 2019

Ecological integrity of priority habitats was based on degree of local human development, amount and local connectivity of habitat, and quality of habit. Indicators were selected to reflect the needs of focal species, as well as other key ecological attributes of these habitats. Ecological integrity was estimated for floodplain forests, freshwater wetlands, human development, major rivers, rice agriculture, tallgrass prairie, and tidal wetlands.

Date posted: April 2, 2019

Prioritization for maintenance of intact habitat (i.e., habitat quality rating of Good or Very Good), based on local scale ecological integrity, degree of threats faced, potential conservation opportunities, and conservation value of surrounding landscape. In contrast to ecological integrity ratings; threat, opportunity and landscape rankings are largely based on the range of values of any given indicator across the geography, sorted by quantile. There are some exceptions, particularly for indicators used to develop threat rankings (e.g., urban development risk).

Date posted: April 2, 2019

Prioritization for protection of habitat (via acquisition or easements), based on local scale ecological integrity, degree of threats faced, potential conservation opportunities, and conservation value of surrounding landscape. In contrast to ecological integrity ratings; threat, opportunity and landscape rankings are largely based on the range of values of any given indicator across the geography, sorted by quantile. There are some exceptions, particularly for indicators used to develop threat rankings (e.g., urban development risk).

Date posted: April 2, 2019

This geodatabase contains inputs used in creating the Edwards to the Gulf Conservation Blueprint. These datasets include county boundaries, HUC12 watersheds, project boundary, open water extent, protected areas, and shallow water oyster reefs.

Date posted: April 2, 2019

We developed multi-scale habitat suitability models for black-tailed prairie dogs (BTPD) in the southwestern Great Plains, corresponding to the western region of the Great Plains LCC. We used long-term (10-yr), high-resolution datasets on BTPD colony boundary locations collected at 7 study areas distributed across the region to develop resource selection functions based on colony locations and expansion patterns.

Date posted: April 2, 2019

The Integrated Monitoring in Bird Conservation Regions (IMBCR) program is one of the largest breeding bird monitoring programs in North America. The program was developed in 2007 to address the need for a collaborative avian monitoring program that produces scientifically defensible estimates of bird distribution and abundance across various spatial scales. The program’s objectives were established following guidelines published by the North American Bird Conservation Initiative’s (NABCI) Monitoring Subcommittee for improving avian monitoring in North America.

Date posted: March 30, 2019

The decrease in the number of monarch butterflies in eastern populations of the United States has led to a Species Status Assessment by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. This project sought to increase the sampling of milkweed within Texas, through which the eastern population travels during its northern and southern migrations. The goals of this project were 1) to complete milkweed (and monarch egg and larvae) surveys, 2) coordinate with other agencies working on efforts regarding monarch butterflies, and 3) to train students.

Date posted: March 30, 2019

Advancement in Geographical Information System (GIS) data development, management, and analysis has allowed conservation practitioners to apply ecological theory into conservation delivery at broad landscape scales. This project demonstrated that process with the creation of Decision Support Tools (DST) to guide on-the-ground habitat delivery to those areas on the landscape that, if managed, will provide the greatest biological return for the conservation dollar invested. This project focused on the habitat needs of Sandhill cranes and waterfowl, as a guild, during spring migration.

Date posted: March 30, 2019

The Integrated Monitoring in Bird Conservation Regions (IMBCR) program is one of the largest breeding bird monitoring programs in North America. The program was developed in 2007 to address the need for a collaborative avian monitoring program that produces scientifically defensible estimates of bird distribution and abundance across various spatial scales. The program’s objectives were established following guidelines published by the North American Bird Conservation Initiative’s (NABCI) Monitoring Subcommittee for improving avian monitoring in North America.

Date posted: March 30, 2019

Priority and use segments for waterfowl (ducks and geese). Segments designated as use areas were utilized during annual spring surveys 2014-2016. The reduced model for ducks indicated a relationship between total area of grass habitats, open water, crops, and wetlands, as well as mean distance to roads.

Date posted: March 30, 2019

This dataset represents results from this study attributed to the NHDPlus V2 catchments. Changes in climate occurring throughout the Mississippi River Basin are expected to lead to additional impacts in stream habitats and fish assemblages in multiple ways, including changing changing thermal properties and flow regimes. To manage streams for current impacts and future changes, managers need region-wide information for decision-making and developing proactive management strategies.

Date posted: March 30, 2019

Across the western Great Plains of North America, groundwater pumping for irrigated agriculture has depleted regional aquifers that sustain stream flow for native fishes. Although declines in Great Plains stream discharge owing to groundwater pumping are widely documented, spatial and temporal patterns in stream intermittency across this broad landscape have yet to be quantified.

Date posted: March 30, 2019

Aerial surveys with locations, habitat type, and count estimates for Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) and waterfowl. Waterfowl were distinguished between ducks, dark geese, and light geese. Habitat types described include: main channel, side channel, pond or wetland, and field adjacent to river, pond, or wetland. Crane and waterfowl habitat use was collected on the North and South Platte Rivers from the confluence of the North and South Platte River near North Platte, Nebraska to the Nebraska state line.

Date posted: March 30, 2019

Summary of project, results, and discussion for the study completed by Mark W. Bowen and William C. Johnson. Summary written by the Great Plains Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GP LCC).

Date posted: March 30, 2019

Holocene environmental change is poorly characterized throughout much of the High Plains. Playa wetlands are sites with appreciable potential for reconstructing environmental change because of their environmental sensitivity. Radiocarbon, litho- and magneto-stratigraphic, and stable carbon isotope (δ13C) data for four playas on the Kansas High Plains indicate significant change occurred throughout the Holocene, which had profound impacts on playa ecosystem functions (e.g. groundwater recharge, surface water storage, and habitat).

Date posted: March 30, 2019

Priority and use segments for Sandhill Cranes (*Antigone canadensis*). Segments designated as use areas were utilized during annual spring surveys 2014-2016. Priority areas were determined using statistical modeling. The reduced model that best predicted use by Sandhill cranes included total area of trees, pits, crops and unvegetated sandbar habitats in each segments. Mean distance to conservation lands and roads and minimum distance to transmission lines and towers were also included in the model. Only distance to lines and total tree area had a significant (p

Date posted: March 30, 2019

Strategic conservation planning for broad, multi-species landscapes benefits from a data-driven approach that emphasizes persistence of all priority species’ populations and utilized landscapes, while simultaneously accounting for human uses. This study presents such an assessment for priority fishes of the Great Plains of the United States. Species distribution models for 28 priority fish species were created and incorporated into a prioritization framework using the open source software Zonation, accounting for species-specific connectivity needs and current fish habitat condition.

Date posted: March 29, 2019

The potential implications of climate change to fishes in Great Plains rivers and streams could range from drastic shifts in distribution to extirpation. Many lotic systems in the Great Plains are not well suited for direct escape routes for fish to move to more suitable habitats at other latitudes due to the west-east direction of flows rather than north-south. Therefore, we might expect additional climate related stress on fish communities in the Great Plains compared to other regions of North America.

Date posted: March 29, 2019

Playa lakes are critically important features of the landscape across much of the American Great Plains, providing the vast majority of the water recharge of the Ogallala Aquifer, tremendous wildlife benefits, and a host of utilitarian, recreational and aesthetic benefits to landowners and society at large. However, playas and their associated benefits are currently threatened by land use management decisions. It is critical to understand the behavioral drivers for both playa conservation and utilization.

Date posted: March 29, 2019

Intrafragment ecology is little studied for imperiled riverine fishes although river fragmentation and habitat loss increasingly threaten sensitive species. A long-term population-monitoring program in the Pecos River, New Mexico, provided detailed data for 15 annual cohorts of speckled chub (Macrhybopsis aestivalis), which were used to assess intrafragment patterns in recruitment and year-class strength in relation to distributional patterns, flow-regime characteristics, and air temperature. Cohorts avoided a degraded upstream reach.

Date posted: March 29, 2019

Conceptually, we overlaid down-scaled Global Climate Model data to assess climatic conditions with fish species thermal tolerance data and potential barrier to movement data to predict future fish species distributions and/or identify species that may be vulnerable to climate projections.  These species distribution data, of 13 fish species at 3 different time frames, were constructed from species distribution models containing only current, projected 2050, and projected 2099 air temperature (obtained from The Nature Conservancy Climate Wizard tool) and average United States Geological Surv

Date posted: March 29, 2019

Redacted transcripts of open-ended focus groups discussions and follow-on questioning intended to reveal the key socioeconomic realities and hurdles that discourage landowners from enrolling in conservation programs or restoring playas. Focus groups were conducted in areas with large playa clusters as identified by PLJV’s science-based Playa Decision Support System.

Date posted: March 29, 2019