Resources

LCCs have produced a wealth of informational documents, reports, fact sheets, webinars and more to help support resource managers in designing and delivering conservation at landscape scales.

These data represent a normalized least-cost corridor mosaic (see WHCWG 2010 and McRae and Kavanagh 2011) calculated using temperature gradients and a landscape integrity resistance raster following the climate gradient linkage-modeling methods outlined in Nuñez (2011), using an adapted version of the Linkage Mapper software (McRae and Kavanagh 2011). These data are depicted in Figure 5b in Nuñez (2011).





Date posted: February 6, 2019

You may need WebEx capabilities to view these recordings.

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Webinar: Washington Connected Landscapes Project - Statewide Analysis

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Montana CAP (Crucial Areas Assessment Web) Informational Web Page

Date posted: February 6, 2019

As the climate changes, human land use may impede species from tracking areas with suitable

climates. Maintaining connectivity between areas of different temperatures could allow organisms to move

along temperature gradients and allow species to continue to occupy the same temperature space as the

climate warms. We used a coarse-filter approach to identify broad corridors for movement between areas

where human influence is low while simultaneously routing the corridors along present-day spatial gradients

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Gnarly Landscape Utilities is an ArcGIS toolbox designed to support some of the less-glamorous tasks involved with connectivity modeling. It includes tools for creating resistance and habitat layers and core area mapping. The core area mapping functionality was formerly packaged as the HCA Toolkit.

Date posted: February 6, 2019

The HCA toolkit is a GIS tool designed to support regional wildlife habitat connectivity analyses by automating the process of identifying habitat concentration areas (HCAs). HCAs are areas on the landscape between which patterns of connectivity are evaluated. The habitat areas identified by this toolkit may be used as an input for Linkage Mapper to model connectivity between HCAs.

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Linkage Mapper uses GIS maps of core habitat areas and resistances to identify and map linkages between core areas. Each cell in a resistance map is attributed with a value reflecting the energetic cost, difficulty, or mortality risk of moving across that cell. Resistance values are typically determined by cell characteristics, such as land cover or housing density, combined with species-specific landscape resistance models. As animals move away from specific core areas, cost-weighted distance analyses produce maps of total movement resistance accumulated.

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Website: Washington Wildlife Habitat Connectivity Working Group

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Montana CAPS Layer Documentation

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Montana Crucial Areas Assessment (CAP)s Interactive Map

Date posted: February 6, 2019

To enhance communications and information exchange on landscape-level conservation efforts, the Great Northern LCC has developed an online resource directory containing descriptions of landscape initiatives and organizations that conduct conservation work within the Great Northern geographic area. The resource directory is a work in progress. The initial list for the Organizations Directory is comprised of organizations on the GNLCC Steering Committee.

Date posted: February 6, 2019

MT Connectivity Project Final Report - 2011

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Climate change is having significant effects on organisms and ecosystems worldwide, but changes in the western  nited States have been particularly rapid over the last 30 years. Resource managers in the West are being asked  o manage for ecological responses to climate, but they have limited access to regional or local information on  he observed and projected effects of climate change.

Date posted: February 6, 2019

This region-wide coordinated bird monitoring program, supported by state, federal, tribal, nongovernmental organizations, and a statewide bird conservation partnership, is designed to provide spatially-referenced baseline data for science-based biological planning and conservation design for the Great Northern LCC and its partners that is directly comparable with other landscapes and Bird Conservation Regions (BCRs).

Date posted: February 6, 2019

2013 Idaho Bird Conservation Partnership Development, Workshop

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Climate change impacts many species through shifts in habitat. The intensity of this impact will depend on the dispersal rates of the species, the patchiness of the environment, and the velocity of habitat change. Here we examine how dispersal affects projected future habitat availability for a threatened carnivore, the fisher (Pekania [Martes] pennanti). We used non-invasive genetic sampling to detect fisher across their historical distribution in Montana and Idaho. This survey included 4846 non-invasive hair snares, of which 288 identified fishers through mitochondrial DNA analysis.

Date posted: February 6, 2019

The fisher (Pekania pennanti; formerly known as Martes pennanti) is a North American endemic mustelid with a geographic distribution that spans much of the boreal forests of North America. In the Northern Rocky Mountain (NRM) fishers have been the focus of Endangered Species Act (ESA) listing decisions. Habitat studies of West Coast fishers in California have consistently identified late-successional forests as important, providing direct implications for forest management and fisher conservation.

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Summary: What is EAGLES (Ecosystem Assessment, Geospatial Analysis & Landscape Evaluation System)? EAGLES is a PC-based series of linked software applications (decision support tools or DSTs) in user-friendly ArcGIS and web-enabled environments that allows biologists and managers direct control and access to powerful data processing and modeling capabilities.

There are six basic DSTs within EAGLES. Together they form a workflow architecture to allow practitioners:

Date posted: February 6, 2019

The Wyoming Interagency Spatial Database & Online Management (WISDOM) System is a user-friendly tool allowing any interested individual to discover, consider, and assess Wyoming’s wildlife resources. 

WISDOM is intended to provide landscape-level information during the early stages of project planning. It does not replace or supersede site specific analysis with appropriate agencies. It should be used in concert with all available data and expertise to ensure project plans address wildlife and habitat conservation at all levels.

Date posted: February 6, 2019

2010 Annual Report: Integrated Monitoring in Bird Conservation Regions (IMBCR): 2010 Annual Report

Date posted: February 6, 2019

2012 Idaho Bird Conservation Partnership Development, Workshop

Date posted: February 6, 2019

This region-wide coordinated bird monitoring program, supported by state, federal, tribal, nongovernmental organizations, and two statewide bird conservation partnerships, is designed to provide spatially-referenced baseline data for science-based biological planning and conservation design for the Great Northern LCC and its partners that is directly comparable with other landscapes and BCRs.

Date posted: February 6, 2019

BCR10 in Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, 1km Grid, Integrated Bird Monitoring by Conservation Region

Date posted: February 6, 2019

GNLCC Website Content: Collaborative Monitoring of Landbirds to Inform Landscape-level Management

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Welcome to the Rocky Mountain Avian Data Center! Here you can find information resulting from a wide variety of surveys conducted by RMBO and its partners. Users can query out count data, occupancy results, density results, and generate maps of survey locations. You may want to read the
Usage Tips for information and tips on running queries. If you’re a manager and wondering how you might be able to use this information please visit our

Date posted: February 6, 2019

2011 Idaho Bird Conservation Partnership Development, Workshop

Date posted: February 6, 2019

The Idaho Bird Inventory and Survey (IBIS) is a plan to monitor all birds (waterbirds, shorebirds, waterfowl, and landbirds) throughout the state in a coordinated, standardized manner. Conservation and management of Idaho’s birds depends on adequate monitoring information. Monitoring information is required by legislative and land/wildlife management agency mandates as well as a host of forest plans, ecoregional plans, preserve management plans, and state wildlife action plans.

Date posted: February 6, 2019

GNLCC Website Content: Forecasting the Impacts of Climate Change in the Columbia River Basin—Implications for Fish Habitat Connectivity

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Methow and Columbia Rivers Studies, Washington—Summary of Data Collection, Comparison of Database Structure and Habitat Protocols, and Impact of Additional PIT Tag Interrogation Systems to Survival Estimates, 2008–2012

Date posted: February 6, 2019
The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) received a request from the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) to provide monitoring and an evaluation of the effectiveness of habitat actions that Reclamation plans to implement in the Upper Columbia River basin, which includes the Methow River. This monitoring and evaluation program is to partially fulfill Reclamations part of the 2008 Biological Opinion for the Federal Columbia River Power System that includes a Reasonable and Prudent Alternative (RPA) to protect listed salmon and steelhead across their life cycle.
Date posted: February 6, 2019

Webinar: Demonstration of the Avian Data Center at Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Webinar: Integrating Fish Physiology, Habitat and Climate Models to Design Aquatic Conservation Strategies

Date posted: February 6, 2019

FY 2011 Progress Report: Forecasting the Impacts of Climate Change in the Columbia River Basin: Threats to Fish Habitat Connectivity

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Project funding included data production for Montana and Idaho to help support the NWI Wetlands Mapper data download webpage and the resulting data is accessible through this web tool.  GNLCC project funds did not directly go toward website development.

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Project funding included data production for Montana and Idaho to help support the NWI Wetlands Mapper website and the resulting data is accessible through this web tool. GNLCC project funds did not directly go toward website development.

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Sagebrush steppe ecosystems in the United States currently occur on only about one-half of their historical land area because of changes in land use, urban growth, and degradation of land, including invasions of non-native plants. The existence of many animal species depends on the existence of sagebrush steppe habitat. The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) is a landscape-dependent bird that requires intact habitat and combinations of sagebrush and perennial grasses to exist.

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Sage-Grouse Require Sagebrish Steppe Infographic

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Sage-Grouse Require Sagebrish Steppe Infographic

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Sage-Grouse Require Sagebrish Steppe Infographic

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Restoration handbook for sagebrush steppe ecosystems with emphasis on greater sage-grouse habitat—Part 2. Landscape level restoration decisions

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Sagebrush steppe ecosystems in the United States currently (2016) occur on only about one-half of their historical land area because of changes in land use, urban growth, and degradation of land, including invasions of non-native plants. The existence of many animal species depends on the existence of sagebrush steppe habitat. The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) depends on large landscapes of intact habitat of sagebrush and perennial grasses for their existence.

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Sage-Grouse Require Sagebrish Steppe Infographic

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Slideshow Presentation File: Grizzly bears, fragmentation, connectivity, and management in the Canada - US trans-border region

Date posted: February 6, 2019

Webinar: De Fragmenting the West: Providing Adaptive Options for Grizzly Bears to Respond to Climate Change

Date posted: February 6, 2019
Population fragmentation compromises population viability, reduces a species ability to respond to

climate change, and ultimately may reduce biodiversi ty. We studied the current state and potential causes of

fragmentation in grizzly bears over approximat ely 1,000,000 km of western Canada, the northern United States

(US), and southeast Alaska. We compiled much of our data from projects undertaken with a variety of research

Date posted: February 6, 2019

The Northwest Boreal LCC (NWB LCC) envisions a dynamic landscape that maintains functioning, resilient boreal ecosystems and associated cultural resources. To support this vision, the NWB LCC partnered with the BEACONs Project to implement a new approach to conservation planning, including the identification of ecological benchmarks to support implementation of active adaptive management. Within an adaptive management framework, benchmarks serve as reference areas for detecting and understanding the influence of human activity on ecological systems.

Date posted: February 5, 2019

The Northwest Boreal LCC (NWB LCC) envisions a dynamic landscape that maintains functioning, resilient boreal ecosystems and associated cultural resources. To support this vision, the NWB LCC partnered with the BEACONs Project to implement a new approach to conservation planning, including the identification of ecological benchmarks to support implementation of active adaptive management. Within an adaptive management framework, benchmarks serve as reference areas for detecting and understanding the influence of human activity on ecological systems.

Date posted: February 5, 2019

The purpose of this volume is to create a resource for regional land and resource managers and researchers by synthesizing the latest research on the 1) historical/current status of landscape-scale drivers and ecosystem processes, including anthropogenic activities, 2) future projected changes of each, and 3) the impacts of changes on important resources. The individual sections can be informative alone, but when combined we can see a holistic picture of the drivers of landscape change in our region.

Date posted: February 5, 2019