Projects By Product: applications and tools

Landscape Conservation Cooperatives use a collaborative approach to identify landscape scale conservation solutions. LCCs work across jurisdictional and political boundaries to work with partners to: meet unfilled conservation needs, develop decision support tools, share data and knowledge, and facilitate and foster partnerships.

As part of a shared science strategy, LCCs coordinate closely with the National Climate Change and Wildlife Center and the eight regional Climate Science Centers.

The South Atlantic Conservation Blueprint is a living spatial plan to conserve natural and cultural resources for future generations. It identifies shared conservation priorities across the South Atlantic region. The second iteration of the Blueprint, Version 2.0, was released in July 2015.

The South Atlantic Conservation Blueprint is a living spatial plan to conserve natural and cultural resources for future generations. It identifies shared conservation priorities across the South Atlantic region. The fourth iteration of the Blueprint, Version 2.2, was released in November 2017.

The South Atlantic Conservation Blueprint is a living spatial plan to conserve natural and cultural resources for future generations. It identifies shared conservation priorities across the South Atlantic region. The third iteration of the Blueprint, Version 2.1, was released in August 2016.

Version 2.0 Data Viewer for the South Atlantic

This project is intended to increase the utility of the International Shorebird Survey (ISS) for making shorebird management and conservation decisions within the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative.

FY2014
The purpose of this project is to develop a series of high resolution (1:24,000 scale) digital wetland maps and associated data to support conservation planning in Nevada.

The Tongass National Forest has identified resources that are important to stakeholders and vulnerable to climate-related stressors. Cooperators will review an action plan and convene a workshop to be held in Southeast Alaska in 2016.

The Tongass National Forest has identified resources that are important to stakeholders and vulnerable to climate-related stressors. Cooperators will review an action plan and convene a workshop to be held in Southeast Alaska in 2016.

Amphibians and reptiles are experiencing severe habitat loss throughout North America; however, this threat to biodiversity can be mitigated by identifying and managing areas that serve a disproportionate role in sustaining herpetofauna.

This project completed a rapid update for wetland mapping in 162 coastal areas (1:24,000 topographic quadrangles in ME, MD, MA, NJ, NY, PA, and VA) that were last updated prior to 2000.

The bull trout is an ESA-listed species that relies on cold stream environments across the Northwest and is expected to decline with climate change.

Assemble three sets of downscaled climate data (historic) and projections (future) developed by the USGS and the Climate Impacts Group at University of Washington; evaluate data documentation and formatting, and edit or repair as needed; deliver all climate data in a userfriendly format from mirr

The Washington Connected Landscapes Project will provide a framework to address the interacting impacts of habitat fragmentation and climate change on ecological systems and wildlife species within the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GNLCC) boundary.

LC MAP, the Landscape Conservation Management and Analysis Portal, allows GNLCC partners to discover, use, develop, manage, and distribute datasets that address LCC priority issues.

With support from the North Atlantic LCC and Hurricane Sandy Disaster Mitigation funds the North Atlantic Aquatic Connectivity Collaborative (www.streamcontinuity.org) has developed a regional crossing assessment protocol and database, scoring systems

With support from the North Atlantic LCC and Hurricane Sandy Disaster Mitigation funds the North Atlantic Aquatic Connectivity Collaborative (www.streamcontinuity.org) has developed a regional crossing assessment protocol and database, scoring systems

The North Atlantic LCC and the University of Massachusetts Landscape Ecology Lab have a cooperative agreement under the Hurricane Sandy Disaster Mitigation Fund entitled Designing Sustainable Coastal Landscapes in the Face of Sea-level Rise and Storms.

The Red River Stakeholder Engagement project’s primary objective was to uncover areas of concern for stakeholders who live, work, and play along the Red River Basin. It examined the complexity of the cultural-geographic landscape across the Red River Basin.

The purpose of Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) is to inform the management of natural and cultural heritage resources in response to shifts in climate, habitat fragmentation and loss, and other landscape level challenges.

This proposal outlines a collaborative regional effort to build a South Atlantic Ecosystem Model that will facilitate the connection of inland and coastal marine management strategies and actions to potential resource and economic impacts in estuarine and coastal marine environments, with the fol

Control of invasive sea lamprey recruitment from tributary streams is a major management objective in the Great Lakes, and benefits from barriers that prevent access to spawning habitat.

An experienced team of wetland ecologists, geographers, and software engineers used a geodesign process to develop and host a web-based geospatial application that will support the identification and restoration of potential coastal wetlands (i.e., areas that could be restored to coastal wetlands

In June 2015, the Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) granted $80,000 to the City of St.

The multi-LCC Mississippi River Basin/Gulf Hypoxia Initiative is a joint effort to find the nexus of water quality, wildlife, and people in the Mississippi River Basin.

This project proposes development of a spatial decision support system (DSS) designed to address an identified major conservation goal of the Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers Landscape Conservation Cooperative (ETPBR LCC), in collaboration with adjacent LCCs in the Midwestern U.S.

Climate change is expected to alter the distributions and community composition of stream fishes in the Great Lakes region in the 21st century, in part as a result of altered hydrological systems (stream temperature, streamflow, and habitat).

This project analyzies projected changes in the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events across the Great Lakes region, namely heat waves, cold spells, heavy precipitation events, and droughts, using a statistically downscaled climate product produced by the Climate Working Group of the

The concept of adaptive management provides a set of good business principles to guide strategic habitat conservation, but these principles are only useful if they are put into practice through a complimentary set of business operations.

Ecological connectivity between the Great Lakes and their tributaries is widely impaired, and many agencies and organizations are currently investing in restoring these connections to enhance target fish and wildlife populations.

This scenario planning decision support tool for the Kankakee River basin as a first case study/proof-of concept.

Waterfowl are ecologically, culturally, and economically important and their annual and long-term distributions in North America can substantially impact ecological relationships and have economic impacts.  In Mississippi, Arkansas and Louisiana alone, recent annual sales of Federal Duck Stamps e

We propose to support the revision and implementation of the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative’s Conservation Blueprint by integrating its Ecosystem Indicators into a structured decision support system that makes explicit how the Indicators are interrelated and how these will resp

This project will build an SR LCC catalog inside of the USGS-sponsored ScienceBase scientific data and information management platform, provide the ability for partner organizations to maintain and contribute to an SR LCC0specific work environment in ScienceBase, and provide stewardship and data

The rapid expansion of pattern tile drainage (PTD) to enhance agricultural production in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) has the potential to negatively impact ecosystem services provided by wetlands.

Develop a geo-database for aquatic habitats with emphasis on rivers, streams, and watersheds, and to use to conduct assessments of stream and river health for Great Plains Fish Habitat Partnership.

In the tropics, ample freshwater is the primary resource supporting thriving human and ecological communities. In the Pacific Islands, many watersheds are threatened by climate change, urban encroachment, and invasion by water-demanding exotic plant species like strawberry guava (SG).

A conservation and restoration priorities tool was developed that provides online access to regional information including: climate change projections, watershed condition, freshwater and terrestrial species, forest ecosystem information and invasive species information.

A conservation and restoration priorities tool was developed that provides online access to regional information including: climate change projections, watershed condition, freshwater and terrestrial species, forest ecosystem information and invasive species information.

This project built on previous National Wildlife Federation work and literature reviews for the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NPLCC).

A sea level rise vulnerability assessment has been completed for the shorelines of San Juan County Washington.

A recent (2008-2012) outbreak of Geometrid moths has decimated subsistence berry harvest in South Central Alaska. This project will develop a risk model to predict where subsistence berry plants will be most resistant to Geometrid attack.

A "gateway" using Data Basin technology has been developed to serve the data integration, collaboration and outreach needs of the NPLCC.

In-person workshops will be conducted to bring the results from the USGS Program on Coastal Ecosystems Response to Climate Change's study on projected climate change effects on coastal environments (funded by NPLCC and NW CSC) to managers in their communities.

This project builds upon existing data and collaborations to incorporate climate change and economic considerations into a decision support framework for prioritizing restoration of passage.