Resources

LCCs have produced a wealth of informational documents, reports, fact sheets, webinars and more to help support resource managers in designing and delivering conservation at landscape scales.

Understanding Fire Refugia and Their Importance to Conservation

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Whitebark Pine Genetic Restoration Progam for the Northern Rockies - Mary Frances Mahalovich

Date posted: February 7, 2019

What is Environmental DNA?

DNA, short for deoxyribonucleic acid, is the hereditary material in organisms that contains the biological instructions for building and maintaining them. The chemical structure of DNA is the same for all organisms, but differences exist in the order of the DNA building blocks, known as base pairs. Unique sequences of base pairs, particularly repeating patterns, provide a means to identify species, populations, and even individuals.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Determining accurate species distribution is crucial to conservation and management strategies for imperiled species, but challenging for small populations that are approaching extinction or being reestablished. We evaluated the efficacy of environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis for improving detection and thus known distribution of Chinook salmon in the Methow and Okanogan Sub-basins of the UpperColumbia River, Washington, USA.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

When unifying genomic resources among studies and comparing data between species, there is often no better resource than a genome sequence. Having a reference genome for the Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) will enable the extensive genomic resources available for Pacific salmon, Atlantic salmon, and rainbow trout to be leveraged when asking questions related to the Chinook salmon. The Chinook salmon's wide distribution, long cultural impact, evolutionary history, substantial hatchery production, and recent wild-population decline make it an important research species.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Determining changes in distribution of imperiled species is important for developing effective conservation and management strategies. Environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis, a genetic method that relies on the collection and analysis of exogenous DNA released by a species into the environment, offers a new way to determine the distribution of aquatic species.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Webinar: Sharing the Balance of Stewardship, The Blackfoot Drought Response Plan - J Schoonen

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Social Network Analysis to Evaluate Change in a Large-Scale Collaborative Management Initiative

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Webinar: Mapping and Modeling Annual Probability of Year Round Streamflow: A Case Study

Date posted: February 7, 2019

On January 7, 2014, Dr. Francis Zwiers presented an overview of the Fifth IPCC Assessment Report.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Prioritizing Mitigation of Road Impacts on Wildlife Connectivity - Meredith McClure

Date posted: February 7, 2019

RMPF Meeting--Update on Cold-Water Ecosystem Adaptation Project - Molly Cross

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Science Delivery: Approaches and Influences on Success - V Wright

Date posted: February 7, 2019

The Cabinet-Purcell Collaborative--A Trans-border Conservation Network

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Conservation organizations in British Columbia have long acknowledged the lack of wetland habitat tracking as a serious deficiency in conserving wetlands at ecoregional scales in a changing climate. To help address this, in 2010 a group of partners, including the Canadian Intermountain Joint Venture (CIJV), came together on a multi-year initiative, the BC Wetland Trends Project, to assess wetland trends and develop an approach for future monitoring. One of their first steps was to commission a report to recommend opportunities for tracking wetlands in BC.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

GNLCC Rocky Mountain Partner Forum Climate Change and Cold Water Systems Workshop
Workshop Summary Report, June 4-5, 2013

Date posted: February 7, 2019

The workshop will focus on adaptation planning and action, how to link science to strategies to actions and scaling up (and down) within the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative region in terms of: assessing vulnerabilities, identifying adaptation options, prioritizing actions and sharing information on adaptation progress and lessons among practitioners in the region. This workshop is being led by the Wildlife Conservation Society, the Center for Large Landscape Conservation and EcoAdapt.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

The Southwestern Crown Collaborative (SWCC) brings together residents, interested citizens, business enterprises, and conservation organizations to consider creative solutions in the management of National Forests in the Blackfoot, Clearwater, and Swan River valleys. It is an open, independent, volunteer organization that encourages broad participation by all interested parties.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

February 4, 2014 GNLCC Rocky Mountain Partner Forum Meeting

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Webinar: Heart of the Rockies Initiative Conservation Atlas

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Summary: As the volume and complexity of spatial data increase, the ability of managers and analysts to use these critical data is compromised. Web/service based data delivery mechanisms provide one method to address this problem, but often require specialized expertise or tools to use. By integrating web services with a user-friendly interface in a commonly used geospatial application, we hope to demonstrate one model for overcoming these data consumption challenges.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Meso-carnivore Monitoring Workshop: Project Map Dec 9-10, 2015

Date posted: February 7, 2019

LC MAP, the Landscape Conservation Management and Analysis Portal, allows GNLCC partners to discover, use, develop, manage, and distribute datasets that address LCC priority issues. In FY11, this effort will extend LCMAP to allow users to generate dynamic interactive map viewers, modeled output, and web services for use in ArcExplorer and other client tools.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Seasonal change is important to consider when managing conservation areas at landscape scales. The study of such patterns throughout the year is referred to as phenology. Recurring life-cycle events that are initiated and driven by environmental factors include animal migration and plant flowering. Phenological events capture public attention, such as fall color change in deciduous forests, the first flowering in spring, and for those with allergies, the start of the pollen season.

Date posted: February 7, 2019
Date posted: February 7, 2019

Produced various Intermoutain West Joint Venture website contnet 

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Climate Change Sensitivity Database Website

Date posted: February 7, 2019

This is the primary access to the LC MAP Data Catalog tool, powered by ScienceBase. LC MAP was originally developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in coordination with the Great Northern LCC and is broadly available for ScienceBase users to share, access, and analyze common datasets. LC MAP was developed to aid resource managers share data across partners agencies and perform intensive geospatial analysis on a landscape scale.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Isaak, D., J. Ver Hoef, and E. Peterson. 2014. New information from old stream data through applications of spatial statistical network models. Atlantic Salmon Conference. Orono, ME, January 9. Oregon Chapter of the American Fisheries Society. Eugene, OR, February 25-28. Idaho Chapter of the American Fisheries Society. Idaho Falls, ID, February 11-13. Water quality workshop: Monitoring, assessment, and management. Boise, ID, February 4-6.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Stream Temperature Scenario Maps, Perennial stream temperature map, Model Prediction Accuracy: Lower Snake, Middle Columbia, John Day, and Deschutes watersheds (HUC 3 - 170601, 170701, 170602, 170703)

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Modern climate change has already begun to alter ecological and human systems. Many of the changes projected for the coming century will necessitate management responses if we wish to maintain functioning ecosystems, protect rare species, and derive needed ecosystem services. Prioritizing management actions in the face of climate change and developing adaptation strategies requires an understanding of how climates will change and which species and systems will be most vulnerable to those changes.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

One of the first steps towards developing strategies to address climate change is to understand how and to what degree ecological systems and species will be vulnerable to projected changes.  The Pacific Northwest Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment (PNWCCVA) is an ongoing effort to provide such an understanding for the systems and species of the northwestern United States and southwestern Canada.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

NorWeST stream temperature scenario maps were developed at a 1-kilometer resolution using spatial statistical stream network models. Stream temperature data used to fit the temperature model that created the scenario maps were screened using a consistent set of criteria to ensure the use of accurate temperature measurements.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

NorWeST summer stream temperature scenarios were developed for all rivers and streams in the western U.S. from the > 20,000 stream sites in the NorWeST database where mean August stream temperatures were recorded. The scenarios include: 1) Adobe PDF format maps depicting historical and future modeled mean August stream temperatures, 2) graphs (JPG format) demonstrating the accuracy of the temperature model, and 3) GIS shapefiles (SHP format) representing the spatially modeled stream temperatures.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

A map service on the www that allows users to zoom to a specific area and the modeled prediction of the stream temperatures at 2040.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

A map service on the www that allows users to zoom to a specific area and the modeled prediction of the stream temperatures at 2080.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

A map service on the www that allows users to zoom to a specific area and see the historic august stream temperatures based on collected thermograph data.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

A map service on the www that allows users to zoom to a specific area and see thermograph point locations in streams that have collected stream temeprature data.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

A map service on the www that allows users to see the NorWeST project's production unit watersheds.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Isaak, D., S. Wenger, E. Peterson, J. Ver Hoef, C. Luce, S. Hostetler, J. Dunham, J. Kershner, B. Roper, D. Nagel, D. Horan, G. Chandler, S. Parkes, S. Wollrab. 2015. Development and application of NorWeST stream temperature climate scenarios for the Pacific Northwest. North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative webinar, January 27.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Temperature in aquatic ecosystems is a fundamentally important property that dozens of resource agencies across the Northwest routinely monitor. Significant amounts of stream temperature data have been collected during the last two decades, but strategic coordination of these collection efforts within and among agencies is lacking and many redundancies exist.

Date posted: February 7, 2019
Date and Time: 
Mar 24, 2011 (All day)

Presenters:

Seth Wenger, is a staff scientist for Trout Unlimited whose current research focuses on potential effects of climate change on fish. He holds a PhD in Ecology from the University of Georgia.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

The NorWeST webpage hosts stream temperature data and climate scenarios in a variety of user-friendly digital formats for streams and rivers across the western U.S. The temperature database was compiled from hundreds of biologists and hydrologists working for >100 resource agencies and contains >200,000,000 hourly temperature recordings at >20,000 unique stream sites.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus (Bonaparte) currently occupy approximately half of their historical distribution across western North America. Sage-grouse are a candidate for endangered species listing due to habitat and population fragmentation coupled with inadequate regulation to control development in critical areas. Conservation planning would benefit from accurate maps delineating required habitats and movement corridors.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Isaak, D, S. Wenger, E. Peterson, J. V. Hoef, C. Luce, D. Nagel, S. Hostetler, J. Dunham, J. Kershner, B. Roper, D. Horan, G. Chandler, S. Parkes, and S. Wollrab. 2015. NorWeST stream temperature model: Data structure, covariates, and applications. EPA Region 10 webinar. February 11.

Date posted: February 7, 2019

These GIS data are intended to assist users in understanding general patterns in bull trout distributions and inferring potential alteration of these distributions with changes in future mean annual air temperatures.  The data have been developed specifically for bull trout and are not intended for use with other aquatic organisms unless similar linkages with air temperatures can be established.  The data are most appropriate for broad scale displays and inference (i.e., map scales ~ 1:1,000,000) and should not be applied at finer scales, where local conditions may cause significant deviati

Date posted: February 7, 2019

Range-wide network of priority areas for greater sage-grouse - a design for conserving connected distributions or isolating individual zoos?

Date posted: February 7, 2019
Date and Time: 
May 28, 2013 (All day)

Time: 11:00 am-12:00 pm Mountain Time / 10:00-11:00 am Pacific Time

Hosts: Pacific Northwest Climate Change Collaboration (C3) and Great Northern LCC

Presenter: Dan Isaak, Research Fisheries Scientist, Boise Aquatic Research Lab, Rocky Mountain Research Station, US Forest Service  

Date posted: February 7, 2019