Resources

LCCs have produced a wealth of informational documents, reports, fact sheets, webinars and more to help support resource managers in designing and delivering conservation at landscape scales.

Riparian ecosystems are vital components of the semi-arid landscape because woody riparian plants provide resources that are absent in adjacent vegetation types. Historically, flood played a key role in shaping the composition and structure of riparian forests. In recent decades, however, the frequency and magnitude of floods has decreased and the timing of peak discharge has been altered. In addition, wildfire has increased in importance as an agent of disturbance along many streams.

Date posted: June 13, 2019

Climate change challenges the management of western water resources. Water is expected to become more limited with increased evaporation, drought, and changing precipitation regimes. Climate change vulnerability assessments provide a method to compare the causes and consequences of changing conditions for species, habitats, and ecosystems. Within the aquatic sector, vulnerability assessments have long been used to gauge the impact of threats on important ecosystems services that provision both human and ecological needs.

Date posted: June 13, 2019

Climate change predictions include warming and drying trends, which are expected to be particularly pronounced in the southwestern United States. In this region, grassland dynamics are tightly linked to available moisture, yet it has proven difficult to resolve what aspects of climate drive vegetation change.

Date posted: June 13, 2019

Woody plant regeneration: population model input in Excel.

Date posted: June 13, 2019

Woody plant regeneration: post fire woody plant data in Excel.

Date posted: June 13, 2019

This project was completed in the shadow of the enormous efforts of the Bureau of Reclamation and partners to complete a forward-looking water supply and demand study for the entire Colorado River Basin ("Basin Study", USBR 2012). The Basin Study predicted a median water supply and demand imbalance of approximately 3.2 million acre feet in the 2041-2060 time period. Billions of dollars may need to be spent on a wide range of strategies and solutions to manage this gap.

Date posted: June 13, 2019

The Improving Crop Coefficients for the Middle Rio Grande Project (ICCMRG Project) was completed by the New Mexico Office of the State Engineer (NMOSE) under a grant from the United States Bureau of Reclamation. The objective of the ICCMRG Project is to assess actual crop water use for the years 2011 and 2013 through remote sensing technologies that estimate the evapotranspiration (ET) of individual crops within the Middle Rio Grande (MRG).

Date posted: June 13, 2019

Effects of restoration treatments on ponderosa pine ecosystems, Front Range, Colorado 2011-2013.

Date posted: June 13, 2019

In 2010, Colorado Front Range National Forests were awarded a Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration (CFLR) grant to facilitate the implementation of restoration treatments across 32,000 acres of ponderosa pine-dominated forests.  Collaborative, multi-party monitoring of the impacts of restoration was a required component of the grant; however, the budget for this work was limited, and initial monitoring plans for the Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forest (AR) and the Pike-San Isabel National Forest (PSI) did not include a strong emphasis on key components of the ecosystem such as wildlife

Date posted: June 13, 2019

Riparian ecosystems are vital components of aridlands within the southwestern United States. Historically, surface flows influenced population dynamics of native riparian trees. Many southwestern streams has been altered by regulation, however, and will be further affected by greenhouse warming. Our analysis of stream gage data revealed that decreases in volume of annual discharge and mean peak discharge and a shift to earlier peak discharge will occur in the Southern Rockies region of Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah.

Date posted: June 13, 2019

Climate change is projected to have an enormous effect on water resources in the western US, with cascading effects on river-dependent organisms. Recent studies show that increasing drought will lead to reduced water in many rivers in the southwestern US. For example, streamflow in the warm season has declined over the last century in the western US and is projected to continue decreasing over the next 100 years.

Date posted: June 13, 2019

Woody plant regeneration: cottonwood population model output in Excel.

Date posted: June 13, 2019

Ongoing and increasing energy development in the west will cause an associated increase in the amount of disturbed land, in turn leading to greater potential for natural resource and wildlife conflicts. Throughout the southwest, renewable energy technologies are being explored, tested, and new facilities are being planned and developed. The existing electric transmission infrastructure will need to be expanded and improved in order to effectively distribute the electricity generated by new renewable power facilities that will be distributing power to consumers across the western states.

Date posted: June 13, 2019

The SRLCC provided funds to the states of Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico to support development of the states’ Crucial Habitat Assessment Tools (CHATs) which provide a decision support system to better incorporate wildlife values, sensitive animals and plants, and important ecosystem features into land use decision-making to reduce conflicts and surprises.

Date posted: June 13, 2019

The SRLCC provided funds to the states of Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico to support development of the states’ Crucial Habitat Assessment Tools (CHATs) which provide a decision support system to better incorporate wildlife values, sensitive animals and plants, and important ecosystem features into land use decision-making to reduce conflicts and surprises.

Date posted: June 13, 2019

Development of CHAT for New Mexico.

Date posted: June 13, 2019

Short-term ecological consequences of collaborative restoration treatments in ponderosa pine forests of Colorado

Date posted: June 13, 2019

The Gunnison Climate Working Group is a chartered partnership of 14 public and private organizations in Colorado’s Upper Gunnison Basin. The Southern Rockies LCC funded The Nature Conservancy to complete a comprehensive vulnerability assessment identifying species and ecosystems most at risk from climate change. The assessment included a set of habitat adaptation strategies for priority species, such as the Gunnison sage-grouse. As a final product, local demonstration projects were designed and installed.

Date posted: June 7, 2019

The Gunnison Climate Working Group is piloting a on-the-ground climate adaptation project to build
resilience of riparian areas/wet meadows – priority brood-rearing habitat -- to help the Gunnison Sagegrouse
and other wildlife species adapt to climate change in the Gunnison Basin. Riparian areas have
been impacted by head cuts, erosion, and lowered water tables. These impacts will likely increase with
increased drought and erosion from intense rainstorms, decreasing food and chick survival. After

Date posted: June 7, 2019

Webinar on Building Resilience to Climate Change in the Gunnison Basin

Date posted: June 7, 2019

Our actions today to build ecosystem resilience to climate change will help us protect the Gunnison Basin’s natural resources—clean air and wildlife habitat, and the livelihoods they provide in the future for people. The Gunnison Climate Working Group, a group of public and private partners formed in 2010, is looking to understand the threats posed by climate change, identify strategies to reduce adverse impacts, and promote coordinated implementation of these strategies.



Date posted: June 5, 2019

This data shows Boat Ramp locations in the Gulf of Mexico. Each data set was compiled from each state, including, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. Data for some of the states may not be completely up to date or completely accurate.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

Climate projection data were downloaded from the Climatewizard application for the coastal region for the Gulf of Mexico. Climate projection data represent the monthly, seasonal, and yearly mean for the time period of 2000-2050 for the following variables: AET:PET ratio, Moisture deficit, Moisture surplus, PET, Precipitation, Temperature, Rainfall Anomaly, and Standard Precipitation Index. In addition, models representing change in the average mean from period of (1961-1990) is available for each of the variables.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

Dataset covering the Gulf of Mexico coast, clipped from the origional datset of the conterminous U.S., for the year 1985-2011. Contains spatially gridded mean monthly precipitation at 4km grid cell resolution. Distribution of the point measurements to the spatial grid was accomplished using the PRISM model, developed and applied by Dr. Christopher Daly of the PRISM Climate Group at Oregon State University. This dataset is available free-of-charge on the PRISM website. Data clip was obtained through climatewizard.org

Date posted: May 31, 2019

Attempts to stabilize the shore can greatly influence rates of shoreline change. Beach nourishment in particular will bias rates of observed shoreline change toward accretion or stability, even though the natural beach, in the absence of nourishment, would be eroding. Trembanis and Pilkey (1998) prepared a summary of identifiable beach nourishment projects in the Gulf Coast region that had been conducted before 1996. Those records were used to identify shoreline segments that had been influenced by beach nourishment.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

NGDC's U.S. Coastal Relief Model (CRM) provides the first comprehensive view of the U.S. coastal zone integrating offshore bathymetry with land topography into a seamless representation of the coast. The CRM spans the U.S. East and West Coasts, the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Hawaii, reaching out to, and in places even beyond, the continental slope. Bathymetric and topographic data sources include: NGDC's NOS hydrographic surveys, multibeam bathymetry, and trackline bathymetry; the U.S.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

The Protected Areas Database of the United States (PAD-US) is a geodatabase, managed by USGS GAP, that illustrates and describes public land ownership, management and other conservation lands, including voluntarily provided privately protected areas. The State, Regional and LCC geodatabases contain two feature classes. The PADUS1_3_FeeEasement feature class and the national MPA feature class. Legitimate and other protected area overlaps exist in the full inventory, with Easements loaded on top of Fee.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines by compiling shoreline positions from pre-existing historical shoreline databases and by generating historical and modern shoreline data. Shorelines are compiled by state and generally correspond to one of four time periods: 1800s, 1920s-1930s, 1970s, and 1998-2002. Each shoreline may represent a compilation of data from one or more sources for one or more dates provided by one or more agencies.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension developed by the USGS in cooperation with TPMC Environmental Services. The extension is designed to efficiently lead a user through the major steps of shoreline change analysis.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

This data set represents the extent, approximate location and type of wetlands and deepwater habitats in the United States and its Territories. These data delineate the areal extent of wetlands and surface waters as defined by Cowardin et al. (1979). Certain wetland habitats are excluded from the National mapping program because of the limitations of aerial imagery as the primary data source used to detect wetlands. These habitats include seagrasses or submerged aquatic vegetation that are found in the intertidal and subtidal zones of estuaries and near shore coastal waters.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

This dataset consists of the current distribution (2000s) of mangrove forests in the southeastern U.S. This dataset was created from the current best available mangrove data on a state specific basis. Florida mangrove data was extracted from Florida Landuse Land Cover Classification System (FLUCCS). For Louisiana, we used observations of mangrove stands from aerial surveys by Michot et al. (2010). Mangrove presence in Texas came from maps produced by Sherrod & McMillan (1981) and the NOAA Benthic Habitat Atlas of Coastal Texas (Finkbeiner et al. 2009).

Date posted: May 31, 2019

Florida - These data were taken from the Florida Boating Access Facilities Inventory and Economic Study including a pilot study for Lee County: A Report to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission on August 30, 2009. This GIS point data set is based on the data contained in the final databases that were provided to FWC on June 2, 2009 in Microsoft Access format.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

This map layer shows major ports in the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. A port is a city, town, or urban area with a harbor where ships load or unload. This is a revised version of the July 2012 map layer.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

These data identify, in general, the areas where final critical habitat exist for species listed as endangered or threatened.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

GAP species range data show a coarse representation of the total areal extent of a species or the geographic limits within which a species can be found (Morrison and Hall 2002). To represent these geographic limits, GAP compiled existing GAP data, where available, and NatureServe data (Patterson et al. 2003, Ridgely et al. 2007, NatureServe 2010) IUCN data (IUCN 2004), where needed.

Date posted: May 31, 2019

This is an ArcGIS shapefile which depicts the seasonal salinity dynamics of 32 Gulf of Mexico estuaries. To characterize the dynamic nature of estuarine salinity gradients, a multivariate methodology (Bulger et al. 1993) was applied to derive five bio-salinity zones in four salinity seasons for 32 Gulf of Mexico estuaries (Christensen et al. 1997). This seasonal salinity zone spatial framework built upon and refined earlier studies which characterized salinity on an annual-averaged basis (NOAA 1985, Orlando et al. 1993, NOAA 2007).

Date posted: May 31, 2019

1985 Gulf of Mexico Atlas abstract American oyster Crassostrea virginica Ostion americano

Date posted: May 31, 2019

This dataset represents the extent of urbanization (for the year indicated) predicted by the model SLEUTH, developed by Dr. Keith C. Clarke, at the University of California, Santa Barbara, Department of Geography and modified by David I. Donato of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Eastern Geographic Science Center (EGSC). Further model modification and implementation was performed at the Biodiversity and Spatial Information Center at North Carolina State University.

Date posted: May 30, 2019

This data is the 2010 era and the 1996-2010-era change classification of U.S.Gulf of Mexico region. This data set utilized full or partial Landsat scenes which were analyzed according to the Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) protocol to determine land cover.

Date posted: May 30, 2019

These data were created as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Services Center's efforts to create an online mapping viewer depicting potential sea level rise and its associated impacts on the nation's coastal areas. The purpose of the mapping viewer is to provide coastal managers and scientists with a preliminary look at sea level rise (slr) and coastal flooding impacts. The viewer is a screening-level tool that uses nationally consistent data sets and analyses.

Date posted: May 30, 2019

The Southeast Blueprint User Guide is a resource to help conservation professionals use the Blueprint to bring in new resources and inform decision-making. It compiles different examples of real Blueprint uses to provide new ideas about how to connect to this larger strategy. It showcases the approaches, wording, and maps that Blueprint staff have found to work best in different situations. It showcases a range of case studies, grouped into a few themes that summarize the primary ways people have used the Blueprint.

Date posted: May 15, 2019

The SE Blueprint 3.0 Development Process is a report that explains how the Conservation Blueprint was created.

Date posted: May 14, 2019

Vulnerability, Resilience and Connectivity of Landscapes and Riparian Habitat in the SRLCC presented by Dave Theobald

Date posted: May 11, 2019
SRLCC_2011_TheobaldReed_Vulnerability_GIS
Date posted: May 11, 2019

The Southeast Conservation Blueprint is a map of important areas for conservation and restoration across the Southeast and Caribbean. The Blueprint categories represent the level of value---high or medium---of healthy natural resources and their potential to benefit fish, wildlife and plants. The Blueprint is the primary product of the Southeast Conservation Adaptation Strategy (SECAS).

Date posted: May 9, 2019

We flew aerial line transect surveys between March 30 and May 3, 2012, to estimate the abundance of lesser prairie-chickens (*Tympanuchus pallidicinctus*) and lesser prairie-chicken leks in four habitat regions in the Great Plains U.S. Estimates were supplemented with data from surveys conducted by Texas Tech University in two regions in the Texas Panhandle and surveys conducted by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation in Oklahoma.

Date posted: April 2, 2019

Vegetative cover surveys for the Nebraska collected for the purpose of developing a land cover map. These data were collected by Nebraska Game and Parks Commission in coordination with the Missouri Resource Assessment Partnership (MoRAP). The overall vegetation community was recorded in addition to the dominant 3 species and percent cover of these vegetative communities: herbaceous, shrub, and woody. A photo was taken of each survey location and attached to the record.

Date posted: April 2, 2019

These are preliminary vegetative cover surveys for the Nebraska collected for the purpose of developing a land cover map. These data were collected by Nebraska Game and Parks Commission in coordination with the Missouri Resource Assessment Partnership (MoRAP). The overall vegetation community was recorded in addition to the dominant 3 species and percent cover of these vegetative communities: herbaceous, shrub, and woody. A photo was taken of each survey location and attached to the record.

Date posted: April 2, 2019

Ecological integrity of priority habitats was based on degree of local human development, amount and local connectivity of habitat, and quality of habit. Indicators were selected to reflect the needs of focal species, as well as other key ecological attributes of these habitats. Ecological integrity was estimated for floodplain forests, freshwater wetlands, human development, major rivers, rice agriculture, tallgrass prairie, and tidal wetlands.

Date posted: April 2, 2019

Prioritization for maintenance of intact habitat (i.e., habitat quality rating of Good or Very Good), based on local scale ecological integrity, degree of threats faced, potential conservation opportunities, and conservation value of surrounding landscape. In contrast to ecological integrity ratings; threat, opportunity and landscape rankings are largely based on the range of values of any given indicator across the geography, sorted by quantile. There are some exceptions, particularly for indicators used to develop threat rankings (e.g., urban development risk).

Date posted: April 2, 2019